New brain map could enable novel therapies for autism,Huntington's disease
Scientists have mapped an uncharted portion of the mouse brain to explain which circuit disruptions might occur in disorders such as Huntington's disease and autism. They looked at the connections of a part of the brain responsible for motor learning, the dorsal striatum. Researchers said they are the first to create the most comprehensive map of connections between the dorsal striatum and the cerebral cortex that is available for any mammal. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - June 20, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Senior physicians recognized for caring for the underserved
Four physicians are being recognized by the AMA Foundation for showing an extraordinary commitment to leadership, community service and care for those in need—each with decades of service that run the gamut from Ebola research to primary care. Find out who has been awarded this year’s honors. Serving underserved international populations The AMA Foundation presented this year’s Excellence in Medicine Awards to  physicians June 10 at the 2016 AMA Annual Meeting in Chicago. Jennifer A. Downs, MD, PhD, assistant professor of medicine and assistant professor of microbiology and immunology at the Ce...
Source: AMA Wire - June 20, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Troy Parks Source Type: news

Weekend Roundup: The Orlando Shooting Reveals the Clash of Civilizations Within
It is de rigueur among tolerant liberals who don't want to divide society further in our unsettling times to dismiss Samuel Huntington's thesis of a "clash of civilizations." But Huntington was right -- though perhaps in a way he didn't grasp. The clash between the personal freedom of liberal modernity and traditional communitarian or tribal values doesn't just, or even primarily, take place at the geopolitical level between the West and Islamic cultures, as Huntington saw it (He also a envisioned a clash with Hindu and Confucian-rooted Asian societies). It plays out within civilizations undergoing transition a...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - June 18, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Huntington's slowed by swapping sick cells for healthy ones, study says
Stephen FellerROCHESTER, Minn., June 8 (UPI) -- Researchers may have found a new method for treating Huntington's disease after injecting healthy cells into the brains of mice with the disease. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - June 8, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

​Huntington Hospital had 11 deaths among patients infected by contaminated scopes
City health officials say Pasadena’s Huntington Hospital should have provided a more timely report of an outbreak of a drug-resistant bacteria from medical scopes that may have been involved in patient deaths. The deadly outbreak caused by contaminated duodenoscopes lead to infections in 16 patients from January 2013 to August 2015, including 11 who died, reported the Los Angeles Times, citing Pasadena health officials. The hospital previously said only three patients were infected in an outbreak… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - June 3, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

FDA Rejects Teva Huntington Disease NDA
Teva received a Complete Response Letter from the FDA regarding the NDA for SD-809 (deutetrabenazine) tablets for the treatment of chorea associated Huntington disease (HD). (Source: PharmaManufacturing.com)
Source: PharmaManufacturing.com - June 2, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

FDA Rejects Teva's Application For Huntington's Drug
The Food and Drug Administration rejected a drug application from Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd., asking for more information on the effects of the drug that treats some symptoms of Huntington’s disease. (Source: WSJ.com: Health)
Source: WSJ.com: Health - May 31, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: FREE Source Type: news

Teva Receives Complete Response Letter for NDA for SD-809 for the Treatment of Chorea Associated with Huntington Disease
JERUSALEM--(BUSINESS WIRE)--May 31, 2016-- Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. (NYSE and TASE:TEVA) today announced that it has received a Complete Response Letter (CRL) from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regarding the New Drug... (Source: Drugs.com - New Drug Applications)
Source: Drugs.com - New Drug Applications - May 31, 2016 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

FDA asks Teva Pharmaceutical for further study on Huntington's drug
JERUSALEM (Reuters) - Approval for Israel-based Teva Pharmaceutical Industries' drug to treat the neurological disorder chorea has been held up by U.S. regulators seeking further blood studies, the company said on Tuesday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - May 31, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Transmission of genetic disorder Huntington's disease in normal animals
Mice transplanted with cells grown from a patient suffering from Huntington's disease (HD) develop the clinical features and brain pathology of that patient, suggests a new study. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 31, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Living in the shadow of Huntington's disease
Four words have haunted Matt Manzone as long as he can remember: "Should I get tested?"Sponsored: Drivers With No Tickets In 3 Years Read This Do NOT pay your next car insurance bill until you try this. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - May 26, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Searching for Spanish reformer José de Gálvez -- minister, mastermind, madman
(Lehigh University) María Bárbara Zepeda Cortés will spend 10 months searching 'The Gálvez Papers' for Spanish reformer José de Gálvez. Lehigh University history professor Zepeda Cortés won a prestigious long-term fellowship to study at The History professor María Bárbara Zepeda Cortés awarded 10-month fellowship to study at The Huntington Library in California, home of largest Gálvez archive in the US. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 24, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Harnessing the 'Natural Killer' within us to fight cancer
(Walter and Eliza Hall Institute) Walter and Eliza Hall Institute researchers, led by Dr. Sandra Nicholson and Dr. Nicholas Huntington, together with colleagues from the Queensland Institute of Medical Research, are investigating ways to 'switch on' our Natural Killer cells.The researchers identified a protein 'brake' within Natural Killer cells that controls their ability to destroy their target tumor cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 23, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Plaintiffs Sufficiently Allege Injury In Contamination Lawsuit, Judge Says
HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A federal judge in West Virginia on May 5 denied a motion to dismiss a groundwater contamination lawsuit against a railroad company and its contractor, concluding that the plaintiffs had sufficiently alleged special injuries as a result of an oil spill involving the defendants' derailed train (Brandy Sigman v. CSX Corporation, et al., No. 15-13328, S.D. W.Va.; 2016 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 60718). (Source: LexisNexis® Mealey's™ Emerging Toxic Torts Legal News)
Source: LexisNexis® Mealey's™ Emerging Toxic Torts Legal News - May 19, 2016 Category: Medical Law Source Type: news

Using exercise to reduce glutamate build-up in the brain
(Canadian Science Publishing (NRC Research Press)) In a new study published today in Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, scientists from the University of Guelph have found that exercise has the potential to decrease toxic build-up in the brain, reducing the severity of brain disorders such as Huntington's disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 17, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

[Research Article] Transforming growth factor-β and Notch ligands act as opposing environmental cues in regulating the plasticity of type 3 innate lymphoid cells
Opposing signals in the tissue microenvironment balance the number of inflammatory innate lymphoid cells. (Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment)
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - May 3, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Charlotte Viant, Lucille C. Rankin, Mathilde J. H. Girard-Madoux, Cyril Seillet, Wei Shi, Mark J. Smyth, Laurent Bartholin, Thierry Walzer, Nicholas D. Huntington, Eric Vivier, Gabrielle T. Belz Source Type: news

Toward a Salivary Biomarker for Huntington DiseaseToward a Salivary Biomarker for Huntington Disease
A new study assesses the potential of a peripheral biomarker for Huntington disease. Medscape Neurology (Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines)
Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines - May 3, 2016 Category: Neurology Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery Expert Interview Source Type: news

What You Need To Know About The Genetics of Mental Disorders
"For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple, and wrong." H. L. Mencken The nature/nurture debate on the causes of mental disorder generates no end of silly controversy by proponents on both sides. The biological reductionists act like the secret of psychiatric disorders is written in the genetic code. They are "mindless"- dismissing the crucial role of environment in how our brain develops and of psychology and social context in how it functions. The environmental reductionists go to the opposite "brainless" extreme- argueing that a psychiatric disorder is a direct r...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 30, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Asbestos Scandal in UK Schools Blamed on Government
Sarah Jane Bowman lives with a death sentence. At age 40, the U.K. native received tragic news that she had the deadly cancer mesothelioma. “To be told that I had a terminal illness and had less than a year to live was simply too much to comprehend,” Bowman said in a report issued by the Joint Union Asbestos Committee (JUAC). “My family and I have struggled to overcome this.” Mesothelioma is a rare disease with a long latency period that affects mostly tradesman, such as pipefitters and contractors, in the latter years of their lives. For them, exposure to toxic asbestos is an occupational hazard. B...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - April 26, 2016 Category: Environmental Health Authors: dev Source Type: news

Asbestos Scandal in UK Schools Blamed on Government
Sarah Jane Bowman lives with a death sentence. At age 40, the U.K. native received tragic news that she had the deadly cancer mesothelioma. “To be told that I had a terminal illness and had less than a year to live was simply too much to comprehend,” Bowman said in a report issued by the Joint Union Asbestos Committee (JUAC). “My family and I have struggled to overcome this.” Mesothelioma is a rare disease with a long latency period that affects mostly tradesman, such as pipefitters and contractors, in the latter years of their lives. For them, exposure to toxic asbestos is an occupational ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - April 26, 2016 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Beth Swantek Tags: Asbestos Exposure & Bans Source Type: news

New method to reduce accumulation of damaging Huntington's disease protein
There may be a new way to change the damaging course of Huntington disease, researchers report. They have shown that reducing the aberrant accumulation of a particular form of the mutant Huntingtin protein corresponds to improvement in symptoms and neuroinflammation in HD mice. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 15, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

UCI team finds method to reduce accumulation of damaging Huntington's disease protein
(University of California - Irvine) A study appearing April 14 in the journal Neuron suggests there may be a new way to change the damaging course of Huntington disease. Researchers have shown that reducing the aberrant accumulation of a particular form of the mutant Huntingtin protein corresponds to improvement in symptoms and neuroinflammation in HD mice. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 15, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Children, Teachers Risk Asbestos Exposure in Chicago Schools
Hundreds of students and teachers in nearly 200 Chicago public schools risk exposure to deadly asbestos, a new report shows. The EWG Action Fund study shows Chicago Public School (CPS) officials in 2013 hired inspectors who advised them of the asbestos problems in the schools. Of the 184 elementary, middle and high schools identified as possible exposure risks, only 11 schools had complied with the recommendations, according to a 2015 CPS asbestos surveillance update. That surveillance report shows some schools still had damaged asbestos-containing pipe insulation that “appears to be separating at some places,&...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - April 7, 2016 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Beth Swantek Tags: Asbestos Exposure & Bans Source Type: news

Researcher receives patent for Huntington's disease treatment
(University of Wyoming) The University of Wyoming's Jonathan Fox developed a method for decreasing the levels of the disease-causing mutant huntingtin protein. This is accomplished by increasing expression of specific proteins that can decrease levels of mutant huntingtin protein in cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 1, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Could a new class of fungicides play a role in autism, neurodegenerative diseases?
(University of North Carolina Health Care) Scientists at the UNC School of Medicine have found a class of commonly used fungicides that produce gene expression changes similar to those in people with autism and neurodegenerative conditions, including Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 31, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Mammography Facility with Revoked MQSA Certificate - March 4, 2016 - Huntington Radiology
Mammography Facilities whose MQSA Certificates Have Been Revoked by the FDA (Source: Food and Drug Adminstration (FDA): CDRHNew)
Source: Food and Drug Adminstration (FDA): CDRHNew - March 29, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Source Type: news

Do you really want to know your medical future?
It starts with a twitch, maybe a stumble. There's a forgotten word or name here and there. Really, it appears a little like drunkenness. But when symptoms of Huntington's disease progress, they consume the person who has it. The neurodegenerative disease simultaneously disintegrates mental and physical functioning, leaving the patient completely dependent on a caretaker or medical devices, or both, for the smallest of tasks: eating, sitting up, swallowing. A person with Huntington's will eventually lose control over their own body and mind. There is no treatment, and no cure. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - March 8, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Huntington's disease gene dispensable in adult mice
Adult mice don't need the gene that, when mutated in humans, causes the inherited neurodegenerative disorder Huntington's disease. The finding suggests that treatment strategies for Huntington's that aim to shut off the huntingtin gene in adults -- now in early clinical stages -- could be safe. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 7, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Songbirds pinpoint effects of Huntington's disease
Scientists have parsed the role of the Huntington's disease gene in an area of the songbird's brain responsible for complex, sequential movements. These findings not only give a clearer view of how the genetic mutation that causes Huntington's disease alters brain and behavior, it may also offer a new therapeutic target for treatment. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 7, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

California Community Paramedicine Pilot Program
  PCTA TV - A joint venture between the cities of Fountain Valley, Huntington Beach and Newport beach testing a program that allows first responder emergency services to choose whether low acuity calls can be transported to urgent care centers instead of hospital emergency rooms. @2016 Public Cable Television Authority Music Used Under license with Warner/Chappell Production Music. JEMS on Community Paramedicine (Source: JEMS Special Topics)
Source: JEMS Special Topics - March 7, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: News Videos Mobile Integrated Healthcare Source Type: news

Novel 'Gene Silencer' Shows Promise in Huntington's Novel 'Gene Silencer' Shows Promise in Huntington's
The first clinical trial of a second-generation antisense oligonucleotide that targets the cause of Huntington's disease is underway after promising results in animal testing. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines - March 4, 2016 Category: Pathology Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Antisense drug for Huntington's looks promising
A treatment that may block and reverse the effects of Huntington's disease has been safely tested in mice and monkeys, and there are plans to carry out human trials. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 27, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Huntingtons Disease Source Type: news

Potential treatment for Huntington's disease, found effective, safe in mice, monkeys
A drug that would be the first to target the cause of Huntington's disease is effective and safe when tested in mice and monkeys, according to data released today. A study to test the drug in humans has begun. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - February 26, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

First drug to reverse Huntington's disease begins human trials
The new drug, called IONIS-HTTRx, silences the gene known to be responsible for the production of a protein which causes Huntington's (Source: Telegraph Health)
Source: Telegraph Health - February 26, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: cure trial treatment protein huntingdon's humans new drug Source Type: news

University of Toronto researcher first to open lab notes in real time
(University of Toronto) University of Toronto researcher Rachel Harding will be the first known biomedical researcher to welcome the world to review her lab notes in real time. The post-doctoral fellow with U of T's Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC) is also explaining her findings to the general public through her blog. She hopes her open approach will accelerate research into Huntington's disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 26, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Human bromethalin exposures reported to a U.S. statewide poison control system - Huntington S, Fenik Y, Vohra R, Geller RJ.
BACKGROUND: Bromethalin is an increasingly used alternative to long-acting anticoagulant and cholecalciferol rodenticides. There are few reports of human exposures, and no existing professional society guidelines on medical management of bromethalin ingest... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 18, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

Scientists win $1.7 million grant to advance new strategies to treat Huntington's disease
(Scripps Research Institute) Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have won nearly $1.7 million from the National Institutes of Health's National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke to investigate the mechanisms that contribute to Huntington's disease, a fatal inherited disease that some have described as having ALS, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's -- at the same time. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 12, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Structure of brain plaques in Huntington's disease described by Pitt team
(University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences) Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine have shown that the core of the protein clumps found in the brains of people with Huntington's disease have a distinctive structure, a finding that could shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying the neurodegenerative disorder. The findings were published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 3, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Chinese Scientists Engineer 'Autistic' Monkeys
(function(){var src_url="https://spshared.5min.com/Scripts/PlayerSeed.js?playList=519443928&height=&width=100&sid=577&origin=SOLR&videoGroupID=155847&relatedNumOfResults=100&responsive=true&ratio=wide&align=center&relatedMode=2&relatedBottomHeight=60&companionPos=&hasCompanion=false&autoStart=false&colorPallet=%23FFEB00&videoControlDisplayColor=%23191919&shuffle=0&isAP=1&pgType=cmsPlugin&pgTypeId=addToPost-top&onVideoDataLoaded=track5min.DL&onTimeUpdate=track5min.TC&onVideoDataLoaded=HPTrack.Vid.DL&onTimeUpdate=HPTrack.Vid....
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 29, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Chinese Scientists Engineer 'Autistic' Monkeys
(function(){var src_url="https://spshared.5min.com/Scripts/PlayerSeed.js?playList=519443928&height=&width=100&sid=577&origin=SOLR&videoGroupID=155847&relatedNumOfResults=100&responsive=true&ratio=wide&align=center&relatedMode=2&relatedBottomHeight=60&companionPos=&hasCompanion=false&autoStart=false&colorPallet=%23FFEB00&videoControlDisplayColor=%23191919&shuffle=0&isAP=1&pgType=cmsPlugin&pgTypeId=addToPost-top&onVideoDataLoaded=track5min.DL&onTimeUpdate=track5min.TC&onVideoDataLoaded=HPTrack.Vid.DL&onTimeUpdate=HPTrack.Vid....
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Protein folding in the cell
(Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology) Proper cell function requires proper protein folding. Misfolding of specific proteins, caused either by mutation or environmental stress, underlies many human diseases, including cancer, diabetes, Parkinson's, Huntington's, and Alzheimer's disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 28, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Hope for Huntington's Disease Patients
An estimated 30,000 Americans have Huntington's disease and more than 200,000 people are at risk of inheriting it. Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center (TTUHSC) researchers identified a mitochondrial division inhibitor 1 (Mdivi1) that may be a promising molecule for the treatment of patients with this disease. (Source: Disabled World)
Source: Disabled World - January 24, 2016 Category: Disability Tags: Medical Research Source Type: news

Hope for Huntington's Disease Patients
Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center Researchers Identify Promising Molecule for Treatment of Huntington's Disease (Source: Disabled World)
Source: Disabled World - January 24, 2016 Category: Disability Tags: Medical Research Source Type: news

8 Mascaras Top Celebrity Makeup Artists Swear By
By Holly Dawsey Long, thick, fluttery lashes aren't just reserved for the stars. In fact, the tools the pros use aren't different than what you can find online, at your favorite department store, or even at the drugstore! Here, the pros behind Hollywood's top looks reveal the formulas they use. Get the celeb (lash) treatment with these tried-and-true picks. For everyday definition Lancôme Hypnôse Mascara ($28; sephora.com) "This is my go-to for an everyday look. It makes lashes appear full and feathery. To apply, hold the wand like a toothbrush and wiggle it from left to right to separate hairs, then sweep...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 26, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Another Extremely Rare Venomous Sea Snake Washes Up On California's Coast
For the second time in just two months, an extremely rare venomous sea snake has made a surprise appearance on Southern California's coastline, suggesting that the abnormally warm temperatures of the local waters are attracting species that would have once given the area a miss. A dead yellow-bellied sea snake, of a type commonly found throughout the warmer Pacific and Indian Oceans, washed up Friday along Bolsa Chica State Beach, about 30 miles south of Los Angeles, according to the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County. A different yellow-bellied sea snake was spotted in Oxnard, north of L.A., in late October. Exp...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 21, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

DNA Is Not Destiny? Well, Duh
A high profile paper just published in the highly prestigious journal Nature suggests that overwhelmingly, cancer results from "extrinsic factors," namely behaviors and exposures, rather than the "intrinsic" transgressions of our chromosomes. The media response is a proclamation that no, cancer is not just about "bad luck." So august a platform for so salient a proposition seems to demand a highly erudite response, and I've got just the one: duh. Didn't we know this already? Yes, it's true, that almost exactly a year ago, a paper was published in the only journal that competes with Nature for ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 21, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New Report Warns Of Dramatic Changes For Arctic Under Global Warming
This article originally appeared on Arctic Deeply. For weekly updates about Arctic geopolitics, economy, and ecology, you can sign up to the Arctic Deeply email list.   Related on HuffPost: (function(){var src_url="https://spshared.5min.com/Scripts/PlayerSeed.js?playList=519340947&height=&width=100&sid=577&origin=SOLR&videoGroupID=155847&relatedNumOfResults=100&responsive=true&ratio=wide&align=center&relatedMode=2&relatedBottomHeight=60&companionPos=&hasCompanion=false&autoStart=false&colorPallet=%23FFEB00&videoControlDisplayColor=%23191919&s...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 18, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Has a Global Gathering of Scientists Found Common Ground on Gene-Editing the Human Germline?
The study of biology often reveals the beauty of natural design and of natural processes. Certainly this is true of the way that bacteria and other organisms defend themselves against attack from viruses. These studies revealed the exquisite way that some bacteria chop up the DNA of invading organisms and use it to create a memory of the invader, the so-called CRISPR/Cas system, which has been receiving massive public attention in recent weeks. Using CRISPR/Cas, bacteria have evolved an "immune system" that helps protect them from attack in the same way that humans have immune cells that maintain a memory of infe...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 4, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Whole Foods Sells Jello Shots For Grown Ups? Sign Us Up
Nothing like a jello shot to bring you back to the glory days of college parties and regrets. Luckily, Ludlow Cocktail Co. has created specialty jelly shots, as they call them, with a grown-up twist: they're all natural and come in unique craft-cocktail flavors. Because watermelon just won't cut it anymore.  "We recommend that people eat them with a spoon, especially because we're adults now," Freya Estreller, founder and CEO of Ludlow Cocktail Co. told HuffPost.  But the best news is that you can purchase them at Whole Foods, along with the rest of your organic grocery needs. Carrots? Ch...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 19, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news