Huntington ’s disease and a patient’s perspective on genetic testing [PODCAST]
“When I was diagnosed as gene-positive for HD, just over ten years ago, there wasn ’t anything promising on the horizon in terms of a cure. It has only been since new clinical trials were announced in the past few years that I have allowed myself to feel a tiny bit of hope, that maybe thereRead more …Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 10, 2021 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/the-podcast-by-kevinmd" rel="tag" > The Podcast by KevinMD < /a > < /span > Tags: Podcast Neurology Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, March 22nd 2021
This article expresses sentiments regarding medical technology and human longevity that we'd all like to see more of in the mainstream media. At some point, it will come to be seen by the average person as basically sensible to work towards minimizing the tide of suffering and death caused aging and age-related disease. It has been, in hindsight, a strange thing to live in a world in which most people were reflexively opposed to that goal. Death and aging constitute a mystery. Some of us die more quickly. We often ask about it as children, deny it in youth, and reluctantly come to accept it as adults. Aging is uni...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 21, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Prevalence of Cellular Senescence May Explain the Inverse Correlation Between Cancer and Neurodegeneration
One of the more curious aspects of aging is that risk of Alzheimer's disease and risk of cancer is inversely correlated. Why is this the case? Researchers here suggest that cellular senescence may be an important component of this relationship. If cells in a given individual are more than averagely prone to becoming senescent in response to stress and damage, then this may lower the risk of cancer, as precancerous cells will be blocked from replication and removed by the immune system more efficiently. On the other hand, increased cellular senescence in the aging brain will more rapidly drive chronic inflammation and neuro...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 19, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, March 15th 2021
In conclusion, PLG attenuates high calcium/phosphate-induced vascular calcification by upregulating P53/PTEN signaling in VSMCs. Tsimane and Moseten Hunter-Gatherers Exhibit Minimal Levels of Atrial Fibrillation https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2021/03/tsimane-and-moseten-hunter-gatherers-exhibit-minimal-levels-of-atrial-fibrillation/ Epidemiological data for the Tsimane and Moseten populations in Bolivia shows that they suffer very little cardiovascular disease in later life, despite a presumably greater lifetime burden of infectious disease (and consequent inflammation) than is the case for people i...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 14, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

A Popular Science View of Mitochondrial Uncoupling
Mitochondrial uncoupling diverts the output of the electron transport chain into heat rather than the production of ATP. Induction of higher than usual levels of uncoupling is a calorie restriction mimetic strategy: it produces some of the same gains in health and longevity as the practice of calorie restriction, with some overlap in the processes affected and metabolic changes produced. Historically, the only available pharmacological approach to increased uncoupling, 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP), has been regarded, correctly, as dangerous. Take a little too much and you will die, because your mitochondria generate enough heat...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 10, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, February 1st 2021
In this study, we characterize age-related phenotypes of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). We report increased frequencies of HSC, hematopoetic progenitor cells (HPC), and lineage negative cells in the elderly but a decreased frequency of multi-lymphoid progenitors. Aged human HSCs further exhibited a delay in initiating division ex vivo though without changes in their division kinetics. The activity of the small RhoGTPase Cdc42 was elevated in aged human hematopoietic cells and we identified a positive correlation between Cdc42 activity and the frequency of HSCs upon aging. The frequency of human HSCs polar fo...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 31, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Aging is Contagious within the Body
In the midst of a discussion regarding the limitations of life span studies, in that the use of death as an endpoint fails to capture all of the variances in health due to aging, the authors of this paper offer up the thought that aging is contagious within the body. Declines in one cell spread to another, directly or indirectly. Consider that the secretions of senescent cells can make nearby cells senescent. Declines in one tissue can spread to another, directly or indirectly. Consider that the progressive failure of kidney function produces cardiovascular and cognitive dysfunction as a result, because the vascular system...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 25, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, November 9th 2020
In this study, young adult mice were submitted to endurance exercise training and the function, differentiation, and metabolic characteristics of satellite cells were investigated in vivo and in vitro. We found that injured muscles from endurance-exercised mice display improved regenerative capacity, demonstrated through higher densities of newly formed myofibres compared with controls (evidenced by an increase in embryonic myosin heavy chain expression), as well as lower inflammation (evidenced by quantifying CD68-marked macrophages), and reduced fibrosis. Enhanced myogenic function was accompanied by an increased ...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 8, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Implicating Striosomes in Age-Related Changes in Decision Making
The brain is very complex, and so the ways in which comparatively simple mechanisms of aging lead to alterations in cognitive function are also very complex. The research here picks up the trail of cause and effect relating to changes in approach-avoidance conflict, a part of decision making, a fair way down the line from first causes, as is the case for much of the work taking place on the aging of the brain. It is nonetheless always interesting to see specific age-related changes in complex traits connected to specific cells and their activity, even when the further connections to underlying mechanisms of aging remain ob...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 4, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, October 19th 2020
In conclusion, we found that regardless of the presence of multimorbidity, engaging in a healthier lifestyle was associated with up to 6.3 years longer life for men and 7.6 years for women; however, not all lifestyle risk factors equally correlated with life expectancy, with smoking being significantly worse than others. A Hydrogel Scaffold to Encourage Peripheral Nerve Regeneration https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/10/a-hydrogel-scaffold-to-encourage-peripheral-nerve-regeneration/ The nervous system of mammals is poorly regenerative at best. The use of implantable scaffold materials is one of the...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 18, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Loss of Sense of Smell as an Early Biomarker for Brain Aging
Alzheimer's disease begins in the olfactory bulb, with evidence suggesting that this is related to failing drainage of cerebrospinal fluid from that part of the brain. It has been noted that a faltering of the sense of smell takes place with aging. This may be a useful way to assess the overall state of the brain on the path towards neurodegenerative conditions, but, considered as a whole, comparatively little work has taken place on this aspect of sensory decline with age. Olfaction, from an evolutionary aspect, is the oldest of our senses. Across different species, it modulates the interactions between an organi...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 13, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Your Smartphone As The Swiss Knife Of Digital Health
7:39 a.m. That’s the time that your smartphone’s sonar deems as optimal for you to wake up today. With its gentle vibration from your bedside table, you pick it up to turn off the smart alarm. As you do so, your phone asks for your permission to use the built-in sensors and camera to run your routine morning scan. It analyzes your voice; evaluates your stress level based on a facial scan; checks your vital signs; and notifies you to take a picture of that mole on your forearm in order to detect any anomalies.  Thereafter, it outputs a comprehensible report with recommendations which you can send over to...
Source: The Medical Futurist - June 16, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Prans Tags: Artificial Intelligence E-Patients Health Sensors & Trackers Telemedicine & Smartphones stress health trackers Huntington's Alzheimer's disease covid19 camera apple health google fit WHO hemoglobin SpO2 Samsung oximetry F Source Type: blogs

Jane Eyre
As part of our lockdown routine we are enjoying theNational Theatre Live on YouTube.  Each week there is a recording of a National Theatre production. This week it was Treasure Island, and last week Jane Eyre.  Mr Rochester is about to marry Jane Eyre, when it is made known that he is already married and Mrs Rochester is the mysterious unseen character who lives in the attic and who might be responsible for various strange goings on in the house.So why is she hidden away?  What has happened to her?  Is she ill?As one does as a medical librarian, I looked in PubMed and found a paper publis...
Source: Browsing - April 18, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Tags: Huntingdon disease medicine in fiction Source Type: blogs

A medical librarian at the theatre: Jane Eyre
As part of our lockdown routine we are enjoying theNational Theatre Live on YouTube.  Each week there is a recording of a National Theatre production. This week it was Treasure Island, and last week Jane Eyre.  Mr Rochester is about to marry Jane Eyre, when it is made known that he is already married and Mrs Rochester is the mysterious unseen character who lives in the attic and who might be responsible for various strange goings on in the house.So why is she hidden away?  What has happened to her?  Is she ill?As one does as a medical librarian, I looked in PubMed and found a paper publis...
Source: Browsing - April 18, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Tags: Huntingdon disease medicine in fiction Source Type: blogs

A health librarian at the theatre: Jane Eyre
As part of our lockdown routine we are enjoying theNational Theatre Live on YouTube.  Each week there is a recording of a National Theatre production. This week it was Treasure Island, and last week Jane Eyre.  Mr Rochester is about to marry Jane Eyre, when it is made known that he is already married and Mrs Rochester is the mysterious unseen character who lives in the attic and who might be responsible for various strange goings on in the house.So why is she hidden away?  What has happened to her?  Is she ill?As one does as a medical librarian, I looked in PubMed and found a paper publis...
Source: Browsing - April 18, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Tags: Huntington disease medicine in fiction Source Type: blogs

Simple Ways to Make Your Home into Your Sanctuary
Suddenly, because of the pandemic, our homes have become one-stop shops. It’s where we work, teach our kids, and attend religious services. It’s where we sleep, eat, and relax (in theory). Besides taking walks and running urgent errands, most of us are staying in. So, it’s helpful to make our homes into a place we actually want to be. Currently, our homes need to “replace a lot of the ‘feel-good’ emotions we had in going out,” said Victoria Vajgrt, a professional home organizer in San Francisco. For example, she said, the yoga studio helped us to relax, while romantic restaurants h...
Source: World of Psychology - April 16, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: General Industrial and Workplace Mental Health and Wellness Motivation and Inspiration Self-Help Stress coronavirus COVID-19 work from home Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, March 16th 2020
We report a new class of natural-product-inspired covalent inhibitors of telomerase that target the catalytic active site. Age-Related Epigenetic Changes that Suppress Mitochondrial Function https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/03/age-related-epigenetic-changes-that-suppress-mitochondrial-function/ Today's open access research reports on two specific epigenetic changes observed in old individuals that act to reduce mitochondrial function. This joins an existing list of genes for which expression changes are known to impact mitochondrial function with age. A herd of hundreds of mitochondria are found ...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 15, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Reviewing CD38 in Neurodegeneration and Neuroinflammation
Age-related upregulation of CD38 is quite closely related to the decline of NAD+ levels in mitochondria. That in turn causes some fraction of the age-related loss of mitochondrial quality control and mitochondrial function. As mitochondria are the power plants of the cell, providing chemical energy store molecules (adenosine triphosphate, ATP) to power cellular operations, this causes a broad range of issues in tissues throughout the body. Mitochondrial decline is particularly influential in the aging of the brain, given the high energy demands of that organ. Due to the lack of effective treatment to at least slow...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 12, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

The Taiwan Election: Dealing with Disinformation while Protecting Speech
ConclusionThis development is testimony to a  simple though important fact: cultures are not stable, unchanging entities, and no nation, be the US, China or Taiwan is by nature endowed with a genetic disposition toward dictatorship or democracy. Culture is something people acquire, not something they are born with. Both in Taiwan and in Chin a more than 90 percent of the population are ethnic Han Chinese, but the countries have developed very different political cultures, and the difference seems to be growing. (Source: Cato-at-liberty)
Source: Cato-at-liberty - February 7, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: Flemming Rose Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, January 27th 2020
Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 26, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

The Decline of Mitophagy in Age-Related Neurodegenerative Conditions
Mitochondria are the power plants of the cell. A herd of these bacteria-like organelles in every cell manufacture the chemical energy store molecules that are used to power cellular processes. Mitochondrial function declines with age throughout the body. Evidence suggests that this is due to changes in mitochondrial dynamics that inhibit the quality control mechanisms of mitophagy that are responsible for recycling worn and damaged mitochondria. This loss of miochondrial function is well known to contribute to the progression of neurodegenerative conditions, as the brain is an energy-hungry organ, making this an important ...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 24, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

PAR1 Inhibition Activates Remyelination
Myelin is the sheathing of nerves, essential to their function. Excessive loss produces disabling and ultimately fatal conditions such as multiple sclerosis, but we all lose myelin integrity to some degree as a consequence of the damage and dysfunction of degenerative aging. This most likely contributes to cognitive decline and other age-related issues. A number of different approaches have been identified to boost the operation of the normal maintainance processes that remyelinate nerves, such as FGF21 upregulation, or increasing the size of remyelinating cell populations. Here, researchers discover another possible trigg...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 20, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, November 18th 2019
Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 17, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Selectively Removing Mutant Proteins by Binding them to Autophagy Components
Researchers here demonstrate a proof of principle for an interesting approach to tackling the aggregation of damaged, altered, or misfolded proteins that is a feature of most neurodegenerative conditions. They target the mutant huntingtin protein, which is probably an easier task than targeting, say, a misfolded protein with a normal sequence. The basic idea is to deploy a linking molecule that binds to the problem protein with high specificity, and also binds to an essential component of autophagy - in this case LC3B, involved in the generation of autophagosomes responsible for carrying materials to lysosomes. This ensure...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 12, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

The Echoes of Patient Safety Events: Errors in Third Year
Conclusion/Takeaways These stories are constantly shaping us; when we notice, think, and share them, how can it not be for the better? None of these stories has an end, because we remember them; they echo. There is multifaceted value in their retelling and reworking, clinically and personally. The curriculum provides students with a platform (the structured assignment), mentorship (the physician reader), and dialogue within a community of peers (the class debrief). It provides faculty with new eyes: the emotion and introspection that can blur with long practice. Together the pieces of the curriculum remind us how much st...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - October 8, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Guest Perspective medical errors medical students patient safety Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, July 29th 2019
In this study we show, for the first time, significant alterations in cholesterol efflux capacity in adolescents throughout the range of BMI, a relationship between six circulating adipocyte-derived EVs microRNAs targeting ABCA1 and cholesterol efflux capacity, and in vitro alterations of cholesterol efflux in macrophages exposed to visceral adipose tissue adipocyte-derived EVs acquired from human subjects. These results suggest that adipocyte-derived EVs, and their microRNA content, may play a critical role in the early pathological development of ASCVD. Commentary on the Developing UK Government Position on Hea...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 28, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Yes, Sam Huntington Has Insights to Guide U.S. Competition with China
Many U.S. observers believe that the United States is declining relative to China. The United States'long-term competitiveness will be served neither by assuming that China is fated to collapse on account of its internal contradictions nor by presuming that it is destined to preside over a world order with Chinese characteristics. Sustainable strategy requires a measured disposition. (Source: The RAND Blog)
Source: The RAND Blog - July 24, 2019 Category: Health Management Authors: Ali Wyne Source Type: blogs

Hippocampal Neurogenesis in Aging
In at least some portions of the brain, new neurons are created throughout life in a process called neurogenesis. This is vital to memory and learning, but declines with age. Faltering neurogenesis is arguably implicated in the development of some neurodegenerative conditions. As most of the evidence for neurogenesis in adult individuals has been established in mice, and in recent years there has been some debate over whether or not these same processes do in fact operate in humans. So far, the most recent evidence leans towards supporting the existence of human adult neurogenesis. Given this, the research community remain...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 23, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

The Causes of Schizophrenia: It ’ s Probably Not Genetics
For more than a century, researchers have had a deeply-held belief that schizophrenia is one form of mental illness that has its basis in genetics. In the intervening years, hundreds of millions of person-hours and billions of dollars have been funneled pursuing the genetic theory of schizophrenia. Despite all of this enormous effort, researchers are starting to understand that perhaps the genetic component of schizophrenia has been overemphasized. And, in fact, the heritability estimates are not the 80-85 percent that some researchers claimed, but instead are far less. A new review article published in Psychiatry Researc...
Source: World of Psychology - July 10, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: General Research Schizophrenia Causes Of Schizophrenia Schizophrenia Causes Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, June 24th 2019
This study sought to investigate what could be learned from how these men have fared. The men were born in 1925-1928 and similar health-related data from questionnaires, physical examination, and blood samples are available for all surveys. Survival curves over various variable strata were applied to evaluate the impact of individual risk factors and combinations of risk factors on all-cause deaths. At the end of 2018, 118 (16.0%) of the men had reached 90 years of age. Smoking in 1974 was the strongest single risk factor associated with survival, with observed percentages of men reaching 90 years being 26.3, 25.7, ...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 23, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

How α-synuclein Spreads Between Cells in the Brain
Protein aggregates of varying sorts are a feature of neurodegenerative conditions. A very small number of the countless different proteins found in human biochemistry can become misfolded or otherwise altered in ways that cause them to both (a) precipitate into solid deposits and (b) draw in more of the same proteins to also aggregate. The aggregates further generate a halo of associated biochemistry that is toxic or disruptive to function in brain cells. Aggregates can also spread between cells, as illustrated here. A sizable fraction of the research community in this part of the field is interested in finding ways to int...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 20, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, June 17th 2019
In this study, analysis of antioxidant defense was performed on the blood samples from 184 "aged" individuals aged 65-90+ years, and compared to the blood samples of 37 individuals just about at the beginning of aging, aged 55-59 years. Statistically significant decreases of Zn,Cu-superoxide dismutase (SOD-1), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities were observed in elderly people in comparison with the control group. Moreover, an inverse correlation between the activities of SOD-1, CAT, and GSH-Px and the age of the examined persons was found. No age-related changes in glutathione reductas...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 16, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Mast Cells in Age-Related Neurodegeneration and Neuroinflammation
Of late, it is becoming clear that the dysfunction of immune cells of the central nervous system, such as microglia, is an important part of neurodegeneration. Growing degrees of cellular senescence in these cell populations, leading to inflammatory signaling, appears to be significant in the progression of Alzheimer's disease, for example. There are many distinct types of supporting cell in the brain, however. This short open access review paper discusses the evidence for dysfunction of the immune cells known as mast cells to be relevant to the progression of chronic inflammation and neurodegeneration in the aging brain. ...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 11, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Is the Trump Administration Pushing for a Cold War with China?
In aWashington Post op-ed last week,  Josh Rogin argued this:Despite what you may have read, the United States ’ strategy toward China does not entail launching another Cold War, imposing a zero-sum game or even winning a “clash of civilizations.” In fact, the entire objective of the Trump administration’s Asia approach is to avoid outright conflict with China. But to do that, Beijing must be deterre d from continuing on its aggressive path.The idea that the White House ’s new approach to confront China’s economic aggression and military expansion represents a “Cold ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - June 10, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Simon Lester Source Type: blogs

150 Years of Boondoggles
Today is the 150th anniversary of the pounding of the gold spike that represented completion of the first transcontinental railroad. Union Pacific, which now owns the complete route, plans to bring its newly restoredBig Boy steam locomotive to Ogden to recreate, with 4-8-4 locomotive 844, the joining of the UP and Central Pacific in 1869. Numerousmuseums andhistory societies are planning exhibits and meetings.While it would be fascinating to watch theBig Boy operate, you ’ll have to excuse me for otherwise being unenthused about this event. As I see it, the first transcontinental railroad was the biggest boondoggle i...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - May 10, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Randal O ' Toole Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, March 4th 2019
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 3, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Upregulation of Autophagy to Treat Age-Related Disease
Regulation of autophagy has been a tremendously popular topic in the aging research community over the past twenty years, so much so that it is very surprising that little progress towards clinical therapies has been made. Search PubMed for autophagy and aging and you'll find a deluge of papers over this time frame, many of which express optimism on the topic of finding ways to upregulate autophagy to improve health and slow the aging process. It is the consensus in the research community that autophagy declines with age, and that there are benefits to be realized through increased autophagy. This may allow many age-relate...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 26, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

CBD Oil for Depression, Schizophrenia, ADHD, PTSD, Anxiety, Bipolar & More
In conclusion, the studies presented in the current review demonstrate that CBD has the potential to limit delta-9-THC-induced cognitive impairment and improve cognitive function in various pathological conditions. Human studies suggest that CBD may have a protective role in delta-9-THC-induced cognitive impairments; however, there is limited human evidence for CBD treatment effects in pathological states (e.g. schizophrenia). In short, they found that CBD may help alleviate the negative impact of a person with schizophrenia from taking cannabis, both in the psychotic and cognitive symptoms associated with schizophrenia. T...
Source: World of Psychology - February 8, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: Alternative and Nutritional Supplements Disorders General Research Treatment cannabidiol Cannabis cbd cbd oil Marijuana THC Source Type: blogs

What does the devastation of the opioid epidemic look like on the ground?
Jan Rader is the fire chief, first responder, and a nurse in Huntington, West Virginia who describes her community's reponse to the opiod epidemic.Huntington is a county of 95,000 people which, in 2017, experienced 1831 overdoses, and 183 deaths.Rader describes some innovative programming in her community to deal with substance use disorder which as reached epidemic proportions not only in her county but across the U.S. Editor's note:I was the executive director of GCASA, the Genesee Council on Alcoholism and Subtance abuse in Genesee and Orleans Counties in Western New York state from 2000 - 2011. I continue to consu...
Source: Markham's Behavioral Health - January 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: David G. Markham Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, January 7th 2019
This study suggests that advantages and disadvantages vary by environment and diet, however, which might explain why evolution has selected for multiple haplogroups rather than one dominant haplogroup. This is all interesting, but none of it stops the research community from engineering a globally better-than-natural human mitochondrial genome, and then copying it into the cell nucleus as a backup to prevent the well-known contribution of mitochondrial DNA damage to aging. Further, nothing stops us from keeping the haplogroups we have and rendering the effects of variants small and irrelevant through the development...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 6, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

A Look Back at the Rejuvenation Research and Advocacy of 2018
Discussion of Mitochondrial Hormesis as an Approach to Slow Aging Cornelis (Cees) Wortel, Ichor Therapeutics Chief Medical Officer, on Rejuvenation Research and Its Engagement with the Established Regulatory System An Interview with a Programmed Aging Theorist An Interview with Reason at the Life Extension Advocacy Foundation An Interview on Mitochondrial Damage and Dysfunction in Aging An Interview with Vadim Gladyshev on Research into the Causes of Aging An Interview with Jim Mellon, and Update on Juvenescence A Lengthy Interview with Aubrey de Grey of the SENS Research Foundation An Interview with Peter de Keize...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 31, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Healthy Life Extension Community Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, December 3rd 2018
This article, however, is more of a commentary on high level strategy and the effects of regulation, coupled with a desire to forge ahead rather than hold back in the matter of treating aging, thus I concur with much more of what is said than is usually the case. For decades, one of the most debated questions in gerontology was whether aging is a disease or the norm. At present, excellent reasoning suggests aging should be defined as a disease - indeed, aging has been referred to as "normal disease." Aging is the sum of all age-related diseases and this sum is the best biomarker of aging. Aging and its d...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 2, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

RNA Fragments and Ribosomal Failure as a Consequence of Oxidative Stress
Researchers here describe a novel form of cell damage that results from oxidative stress, one that has not yet been investigated in any meaningful way. Oxidative stress is the name given to raised levels of oxidative molecules (free radicals, reactive oxygen species, and others) and the damage that they cause inside cells, in the form of chemical reactions that disable protein machinery. That damage is constantly occurring and constantly repaired, even in young cells, but in old cells the damage outpaces the repair mechanisms. Oxidative damage was at one time thought to be a fairly straightforward cause of aging, but that ...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 30, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Let ’ s Keep Genetic Information an Individual Affair
These times train us to seek continually for more data and more transparency, always assuming that more is better. But some types of data and transparency bring risks, because “A little learning is a dangerous thing.” In particular, sharing genetic information with family members raises daunting ethical issues, along with the need for a mature understanding of consequences, as illustrated by a court case from the UK recently reported in The Guardian. Superficially, this case seems to be a simple balancing act concerning how far a doctor is responsible to fulfill a family member’s right to know. But in con...
Source: EMR and HIPAA - November 29, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Andy Oram Tags: Genomics Data Transparency Privacy Source Type: blogs

What ’s the Difference Between Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia?
In a nutshell, dementia is a symptom, and Alzheimer's disease is the cause of the symptom. When someone is told they have dementia, it means that they have significant memory problems as well as other cognitive difficulties, and that these problems are severe enough to get in the way of daily living.....Dementia presents as a group of symptoms, and Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia.When someone is told they have Alzheimer's or dementia,it means they have significant memory problems as well as other cognitive and behavioral issues.Most of the time dementia is caused by Alzheimer's disease.By Bob DeMar...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - November 20, 2018 Category: Neurology Tags: Alzheimer's Dementia Alzheimer's disease alzheimer's vs dementia symptoms the difference between alzheimer's and dementia Source Type: blogs

Americans Fighting the Opioid Crisis in Their Own Backyards
Credit: New York Times article, Jan. 19, 2016. The United States is in the midst of an opioid overdose epidemic. The rates of opioid addiction, babies born addicted to opioids, and overdoses have skyrocketed in the past decade. No population has been hit harder than rural communities. Many of these communities are in states with historically low levels of funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). NIGMS’ Institutional Development Award (IDeA) program builds research capacities in these states by supporting basic, clinical, and translational research, as well as faculty development and infrastructure impro...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - August 1, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Chris Palmer Tags: Pharmacology Medicines Opioids Pain Source Type: blogs

Perspective: How brain training games could help patients with Huntington ’s disease
This article was originally published in The Conversation. The Article in Context For further information about Huntington’s disease and support, visit The Huntington’s disease association, or HDBuzz Five reasons the future of brain enhancement is digital, pervasive and (hopefully) bright 10 neurotechnologies about to transform brain enhancement and brain health Can brain training work? Yes, if it meets these 5 conditions   (Source: SharpBrains)
Source: SharpBrains - July 20, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Emma Yhnell Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Technology brain-disorder Brain-Training brain-training-games Huntingtons-Disease Source Type: blogs

An Approach to Interfering in Mitochondrially Mediated Cell Death due to Amyloid- β in Alzheimer's Disease
In this study, we examine multiple mitochondrial pathways of amyloid toxicity in neuronal and cerebral endothelial cells (ECs), and evaluate CAIs methazolamide (MTZ) and, for the first time, its analog acetazolamide (ATZ), on specific Aβ-mediated pathways of mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptotic cell death. The CAIs selectively inhibited mitochondrial dysfunction pathways induced by Aβ, without affecting metabolic function. Due to the long-term use of MTZ and ATZ in chronic conditions, the efficacy and the safety of their systemic administration have been widely assessed, making clinical trials for CAIs ...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 22, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, May 21st 2018
In conclusion, the connection between DNA damage and aging is emphasized by the secretion of senescence-associated proteins during cellular senescence, a phenotype which is activated by DNA damage and is common for both human and mice. Though much progress has been achieved, full understanding of these mechanisms has still a long way to go. XPO1 as a Novel Target for Therapies to Enhance Autophagy https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2018/05/xpo1-as-a-novel-target-for-therapies-to-enhance-autophagy/ Autophagy is the name given to a collection of cellular housekeeping processes that recycle damaged and un...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 20, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Considering Mitochondria and Neurodegeneration
Since mitochondria seem to be the dominant theme this week, today I thought I'd point out a couple of recent open access papers that focus on the role of mitochondrial function (and dysfunction) in the neurodegeneration that accompanies aging. Every cell bears a swarm of mitochondria, the descendants of ancient symbiotic bacteria. Even though mitochondria long ago evolved into integrated cellular components, they still behave very much like bacteria in many ways. They multiply through division, and can fuse together and swap component parts, pieces of the molecular machinery necessary to their function. They also contain t...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 16, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs