Matthew ’s health care tidbits: Drug prices
Each week I’ve been adding a brief tidbits section to the THCB Reader, our weekly newsletter that summarizes the best of THCB that week (Sign up here!). Then I had the brainwave to add them to the blog. They’re short and usually not too sweet! –Matthew Holt For my health care tidbits this week, I am going to talk drug pricing. Anyone who gets basically any health policy newsletter has seen some of the cash PhRMA has splashed trying to make it seem as though the American public is terrified of drug price controls. But as Michael Millenson on a recent THCB Gang pointed out, when Kaiser Health News asked the questio...
Source: The Health Care Blog - November 30, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: matthew holt Tags: Health Policy Matthew Holt Pharmaceuticals Drug Pricing KHN Source Type: blogs

The Humira Patent Thicket and the Noerr-Pennington Doctrine
Ryan Knox (Yale Law School), Gregory Curfman, The Humira Patent Thicket and the Noerr-Pennington Doctrine, SSRN: Humira (adalimumab) is among the best-selling drugs in the United States and around the world. Even though the core patent for Humira expired in... (Source: HealthLawProf Blog)
Source: HealthLawProf Blog - March 20, 2021 Category: Medical Law Authors: Katharine Van Tassel Source Type: blogs

Early, tight control of Crohn ’s disease may have lasting benefits
The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is a remarkable organ: it resides on the inside of our bodies, but is regularly in contact with the outside world by virtue of what we ingest. It is quite incredible that the immune cells of the GI tract are not activated more regularly by the many foreign products it encounters every day. Only when the GI tract encounters an intruder that risks causing disease do the immune cells of the GI tract spring into action. That is, of course, under normal circumstances. In people with Crohn’s disease, the normally tolerant immune cells of the GI tract are activated without provocation, and this a...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - October 16, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sarah Flier, MD Tags: Digestive Disorders Source Type: blogs

The U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois Dismisses Antitrust Case Challenging Patent Thicket (Humira)
Michael A. Carrier (Rutgers), The U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois Dismisses Antitrust Case Challenging Patent Thicket (Humira), e-Competitions (2020, Forthcoming): Whether behavior relating to a patent thicket presents an antitrust issue is a nuanced question. But... (Source: HealthLawProf Blog)
Source: HealthLawProf Blog - October 5, 2020 Category: Medical Law Authors: Katharine Van Tassel Source Type: blogs

Harvard Health Ad Watch: An arthritis ad in 4 parts
Perhaps you’ve grown as weary as I have of repeated arthritis ads. They appear in frequent rotation on television, online, and in magazines, promoting Enbrel, Humira, Otezla, Xeljanz, and others. If you’ve actually read or listened to these ads, you might have felt perplexed at certain points. Here’s a quick rundown on what they’re saying — and not saying — in one of those ads. “The clock is ticking” Part 1: A teakettle whistles on the stove and a disembodied voice speaks as this ad for Humira opens. “This is your wakeup call. If you have moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis, month after month the cloc...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - April 29, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Arthritis Bones and joints Health Inflammation Source Type: blogs

Harvard Health AdWatch: An arthritis ad in 4 parts
Perhaps you’ve grown as weary as I have of repeated arthritis ads. They appear in frequent rotation on television, online, and in magazines, promoting Enbrel, Humira, Otezla, Xeljanz, and others. If you’ve actually read or listened to these ads, you might have felt perplexed at certain points. Here’s a quick rundown on what they’re saying — and not saying — in one of those ads. “The clock is ticking” Part 1: A teakettle whistles on the stove and a disembodied voice speaks as this ad for Humira opens. “This is your wakeup call. If you have moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis, month after month the cloc...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - April 29, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Arthritis Bones and joints Health Inflammation Source Type: blogs

Thou Shalt Not Try to Outsmart Me
By HANS DUVEFELT, MD Medical researchers and their groupies – early adopters, thoughtleaders, those easily influenced or whatever you want to call them – never seem to learn that when you try to outsmart Mother Nature or Our Heavenly Father, whichever appeals more to your world view, you usually get your hand slapped. When I was a resident (1981-1984), I got penalized if I didn’t offer postmenopausal women estrogen-progesterone replacement therapy because it seemed obvious that if women with endogenous estrogen didn’t get many strokes or heart attacks and women without estrogen did, all we needed to do was ma...
Source: The Health Care Blog - December 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Medical Practice Physicians Primary Care Hans Duvefelt Source Type: blogs

Living with Crohn ’s disease: Recognizing and managing flares
Crohn’s disease is an inflammatory condition that can affect any part of the gastrointestinal tract. Together with ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s is one of the two main types of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Crohn’s affects approximately 500,000 Americans and is a chronic, lifelong condition that typically alternates between periods of relatively stable or absent symptoms (remission) and periods of symptom flare-ups that can last for days, weeks, or even months. The goal of treatment is to induce remission and then to maximize the chance that patients stay in remission. However, almost everyone with Crohn’s diseas...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - November 26, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Garber, MD Tags: Digestive Disorders Health Source Type: blogs

Reducing Healthcare Costs; Surgery at a Selected Hospital and Pharma Tourism
Individuals and self-insured companies have adopted various strategies to reduce the rising cost of healthcare for themselves and their employees. A recent article discussed howWalmart was flying employees who were candidates for particular surgical procedures to selected, distant hospitals for evaluation (see:Walmart Flies Employees to Top Hospitals for Surgeries in a Bid to Cut Healthcare Costs). Below is an excerpt from it:Walmart ’s answer [to rising healthcare costs] is its six-year-oldCenters of Excellence (COE) program. In partnership with third-party administrator Health Design Plus (HDP), Walmart directly contra...
Source: Lab Soft News - July 15, 2019 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Bruce Friedman Tags: Cost of Healthcare Healthcare Innovations Healthcare Insurance Medical Consumerism Pharmaceutical Industry Public Health Quality of Care Source Type: blogs

Wheat Belly and Autoimmune Diseases
The Wheat Belly lifestyle begins with elimination of the worst and most dominant of all grains in the diet, semi-dwarf wheat products, followed by elimination of its closely-related brethren in other grains. This alone is a powerful start in reversing the 200-some diseases of autoimmunity. We now know that the gliadin protein of wheat and related proteins in other grains trigger increased intestinal permeability that initiates the process, as highly inflammatory compounds, such as lipopolysaccharide from bacterial cell walls, are permitted entry into the body. We also know that gliadin itself gains entry into the bloodstr...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - January 11, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates autoimmune Gliadin gluten-free grain-free grains Inflammation wheat belly Source Type: blogs

MKSAP: 38-year-old man with ulcerative colitis
Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 38-year-old man is evaluated in follow-up after a diagnosis of ulcerative colitis. Ten days ago he was started on prednisone, 60 mg/d, but his symptoms have not improved. He has six to nine bloody bowel movements per day and moderate abdominal pain. He has decreased his oral intake because eating exacerbates his pain and diarrhea. On physical examination, temperature is 37.0 °C (98.6 °F), blood pressure is 110/56 mm Hg, and pulse rate is 96/min. He is pale but in no distress. The abdomen is diffusely tender ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 5, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/mksap" rel="tag" > mksap < /a > Tags: Conditions Gastroenterology Source Type: blogs

UnitedHealthcare Will Share Rebates with Patients
On March 6, 2018, UnitedHealthcare announced that beginning in 2019, the company will expand its pharmacy discounts to the seven million enrollees who are in fully insured commercial group plans at the point of sale for drugs, if a rebate is offered by the manufacturer. The savings will apply to plan participants who are filling a prescription for a drug where the manufacturer provides a rebate. The savings from the rebates will be applied upfront, at the time of the sale, to ensure that patients are paying the lowest amount possible under their insurance plan. UHC notes that currently, rebates are used to keep premiums l...
Source: Policy and Medicine - March 16, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs

Screening Recommendations Based on Doctor Personal Experiences
Recently in JAMA," ...a research letter... explores howsocial interactions with friends, family and colleagues who have been diagnosed with breast cancer may affect a physician ’s recommendations to patients. "What it found was that a doctor ' s personal experiences impact what they recommend for their patients. They did not necessarily follow the current guidelines. " Physicians familiar with someone with a poor prognosis who was not diagnosed via screening were much more likely to recommend routine checks for women between 40 and 44 years old and those over 75. "“Describing a woman whose breast cancer was not di...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - December 19, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: arthritis treatment cancer history cancer screening medical history Source Type: blogs

The Six Worst U.S. Health Disasters of the Last 50 Years
Up until the first half of the twentieth century, large-scale health disasters were mostly due to natural causes (earthquakes, volcanoes, hurricanes, etc.) or infections (e.g., smallpox, influenza epidemics, cholera). But something peculiar happened as we entered the second half of the century: Health disasters due to natural causes became dwarfed by large-scale health disasters that are man-made. Here’s a list of the Six Worst U.S. Health Disasters of the Last 50 Years, mostly man-made phenomena that have exacted huge tolls: widespread disease, premature death, poorly managed (though nonetheless highly profitable fo...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - December 2, 2017 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Undoctored Wheat Belly Lifestyle autoimmune gluten grain-free grains Inflammation low-carb Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

FDA Approves Sixth United States Biosimilar
Recently, the FDA announced that it approved Boehringer Ingelheim’s Cyltezo (adalimumab-adbm), the second biosimilar to AbbVie’s blockbuster Humira and sixth biosimilar in the United States. “Cyltezo is the first biosimilar from Boehringer Ingelheim to be approved by the FDA and marks an important step towards our goal of providing new and more affordable treatment options to healthcare providers and patients,” said Ivan Blanarik, Senior Vice President and Head of Therapeutic Area Biosimilars at Boehringer Ingelheim. “Chronic inflammatory diseases collectively affect 23.5 million people in the U.S., and Cyltezo h...
Source: Policy and Medicine - November 17, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs