Environmentalists being brutally murdered across Honduras as they fight for Indigenous people's rights... Industry employees attack activists with MACHETES
(NaturalNews) People attending an international gathering to honor the life of indigenous leader Berta Caceres, were brutally attacked by people allegedly affiliated with the dam company, DESA. Caceres spent much of her life leading the resistance against a hydroelectric mega-project... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 19, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Department of Health Services Confirms First Case of Zika Virus in Wisconsin
Department of Health Services (DHS) health officials today announced a Wisconsin resident has a confirmed case of Zika virus infection. The individual who tested positive is a woman who recently traveled to Honduras, where Zika-infected mosquitoes are present. There have been no locally-acquired cases of Zika virus infection in Wisconsin or in the continental United States. “Wisconsin is one of the last states to have a confirmed case of Zika virus infection...(see release) (Source: Wisconsin DHFS Press Releases)
Source: Wisconsin DHFS Press Releases - May 18, 2016 Category: Hospital Management Authors: redinadcfw Source Type: news

ACR Foundation Presents Global Humanitarian Awards
Washington, DC — The American College of Radiology Foundation (ACRF) presented its individual Global Humanitarian Award to Kristen DeStigter, MD, FACR, of Burlington, VT and Peter Dross, MD, of Wilmington, DE. The World Federation of Pediatric Imaging and Rotary Club of Park Ridge, Ill., earned the group award. The awards, honoring the individuals’ and groups’ positive global impact of radiology services, were announced at ACR 2016—The Crossroads of Radiology®, which is being held May 15–19 in Washington, DC. “These individuals and organizations are dedicated to helping those in und...
Source: American College of Radiology - May 18, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Pregnant Connecticut teen shocked to learn she has Zika
Sara Mujica said she found out she was pregnant in March while she was visiting her fiance, the baby's father, in Honduras (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - May 10, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Honduras suspects first case of microcephaly in pregnant Zika patient
TEGUCIGALPA (Reuters) - The Central American nation of Honduras "strongly suspects" it has detected its first case of an unborn child with microcephaly in a pregnant woman infected with the Zika virus, the country's deputy health minister Francis Contreras said on Monday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - May 10, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Spreading the word: Youth educators provide sexual and reproductive health outreach in Honduras
Language English LA CEIBA, Honduras – A quiet student approaches a nondescript wooden box and casually slips in a folded piece of paper. On it is scrawled a burning question. “Can contraceptive pills cause infertility?” As the day goes on, the scenario repeats. “Are condoms safe?” “Is it normal for my uncle or step-father to touch me?” “How do contraceptive implants work?”  (Source: UNFPA News)
Source: UNFPA News - April 19, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: lscott Source Type: news

Rising hunger in Central America and Haiti as El Niño follows prolonged drought – UN agency
The United Nations food relief agency committed today to assisting 1.6 million people hit by droughts exacerbated by El Niño in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Haiti and building resilience against future climatic shocks. (Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security)
Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security - April 7, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Weekend Roundup: Between Engagement and Terror
This week we witnessed a world coming together and a world falling apart, a world between engagement and terror. For the first time in nearly 90 years, an American president visited Cuba, turning upside down the anti-Yanqui narrative that has been the raison d'être of one of the Western Hemisphere's most longest-lasting dictatorships. In Havana, President Barack Obama promised to work toward lifting the embargo on Cuba just as he has done in Iran, where the advance of reformists in last month's election has already demonstrated the fruits of that opening. In Brussels, it appears that some children of Muslim immigran...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 26, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Intimate partner violence norms cluster within households: an observational social network study in rural Honduras - Shakya HB, Hughes DA, Stafford D, Christakis NA, Fowler JH, Silverman JG.
BACKGROUND: Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a complex global problem, not only because it is a human rights issue, but also because it is associated with chronic mental and physical illnesses as well as acute health outcomes related to injuries for wome... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 20, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Jurisprudence, Laws, Legislation, Policies, Rules Source Type: news

The CDC Makes One Big Change To Its Zika Virus Travel Warnings
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention made one crucial update Friday to its travel warnings for the 37 countries and territories affected by Zika virus. Instead of issuing a blanket warning against entire countries, the CDC is adjusting their health notices to take into account the area’s elevation. The Aedes aegypti mosquito, the main mode of Zika virus transmission, does not generally live in areas that are 6,500 feet or more above sea level. This means women who are pregnant will likely not encounter a mosquito carrying Zika if they stay in high-elevation areas, although the agency notes that th...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 11, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

If You Don't Like The Idea Of Abortion, Don't Get One
The World Health Organization estimates that 211 million pregnancies occur each year. Approximately 87 million of these pregnancies occur unintentionally. Of the total number of pregnancies a year, around 46 million end in abortion. Around 40 percent of these are carried out under unsafe conditions; 47,000 women die as a result of unsafe abortions each year. Surely, this is not what we want for our women. Abortion is not about opinion. Legalizing abortion is not a question of beliefs, taboos or religion-- all that should not even be part of the conversation. Abortion is a question of public health, and it must be dealt wi...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 3, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Latest On Zika: Experts Are Divided Over Genetically Modified Mosquitos
The Zika virus, which is spread by the Aedes aegypti mosquito, is strongly suspected to be linked to a new wave of microcephaly cases in Brazil. Babies born with the birth defect have smaller heads and sometimes brains that aren't fully developed, which can result in life-long developmental problems.    Zika is currently spreading through Central and South America and the Caribbean, and with the high volume of news about the virus, it's tough to stay up-to-date. Check out our full coverage, or read our daily recaps. Here are four updates, opinions and developments to know about now:   1. ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 16, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Latest On Zika: Virus In Bodily Fluids Prompts New Sex Recommendations
On Friday, Brazilian researchers detected Zika virus in saliva and urine for the first time. While it's still too early to say whether the disease can be spread by the fluids, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention updated its health guidelines for pregnant women to include sexual health recommendations.  The Zika virus, which is spread by the Aedes aegypti mosquito, is strongly suspected to be linked to a new wave of microcephaly cases in Brazil. Babies born with the birth defect have smaller heads and brains that aren't fully developed, which can result in life-long developmental problems. &nb...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 6, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Honduras, Nicaragua report first cases of Zika in pregnant women
MANAGUA/TEGUCIGALPA (Reuters) - Nicaragua and Honduras have both detected their first cases of the Zika virus in pregnant women, the Central American countries' governments said on Thursday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - February 5, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

What Pregnant Women Should Know About Zika Virus
On Monday, the World Health Organization declared a "public health emergency of international concern" due to the cluster of birth defects potentially linked to Zika virus.   No one is probably more concerned about this connection than the world’s pregnant women, especially those who are living in an area where there is ongoing Zika virus transmission. While the virus’ symptoms (fever, headache, joint pain, conjunctivitis) are no cause for alarm and rarely require hospitalization, the disease is suspected of causing severe birth defects like microcephaly, when a baby is born with an abnormally sm...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 2, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

An Illustrated Guide To The Zika Outbreak
In October 2015, Brazilian health authorities notified the World Health Organization that an alarming number of Brazilian babies had been born with microcephaly, a rare, debilitating birth defect with lifelong consequences. Researchers quickly linked the spike in birth defects to the outbreak of a little-known tropical disease called Zika virus, which is transmitted by mosquito. Since its discovery in Uganda in 1947, Zika virus has popped up in different African and Asian countries, but no widespread outbreaks had occurred until 2013, when the virus infected an estimated 11 percent of the population of French Polynesi...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 22, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

An Illustrated Guide To The Zika Outbreak
In October 2015, Brazilian health authorities notified the World Health Organization that an alarming number of Brazilian babies had been born with microcephaly, a rare, debilitating birth defect with lifelong consequences. Researchers quickly linked the spike in birth defects to the outbreak of a little-known tropical disease called Zika virus, which is transmitted by mosquito. Since its discovery in Uganda in 1947, Zika virus has popped up in different African and Asian countries, but no widespread outbreaks had occurred until 2013, when the virus infected an estimated 11 percent of the population of French Polynesi...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Pregnant Women Shouldn't Travel To Countries With Zika Virus, CDC Says
People traveling to Central America and South America, as well as some islands in the Caribbean, should take special precautions against mosquito bites because of an outbreak of Zika virus, a previously rare disease that may be linked to serious birth defects. Pregnant women should consider avoiding the region, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advised. The CDC on Friday issued a "Level 2" travel notice for Brazil, Colombia, El Salvador, French Guiana, Guatemala, Honduras, Martinique, Mexico, Panama, Paraguay, Suriname, Venezuela and Puerto Rico, as well as the Caribbean islands Haiti and M...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 16, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mexico’s murder rate has led to decrease in men’s life expectancy, UCLA-led study shows
Mexico’s staggering homicide rate has taken a toll on the mortality rate for men — and it could be even worse than the statistics indicate, a new study from the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health suggests. Improvements in living standards and in the availability of health care helped boost life expectancy throughout Latin America during the second half of the 20th century. But that trend slowed in the early 2000s and began reversing after 2005 due to the rising homicide rate in Central America and Mexico. In Mexico, that rate more than doubled from 9.5 per 100,000 deaths in 2005 to 22 per 100,...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 5, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Zika virus infection – Honduras
On 16 December 2015, the Ministry of Health (MoH) of Honduras reported two (2) autochthonous cases of Zika virus infection. Both cases are male and residents of the southern area of Honduras. The cases were identified through active surveillance, and laboratory-confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The MoH called on the public to continue prevention and control activities, including vector control. The proximity of mosquito vector breeding sites to human habitation is a significant risk factor for Zika virus infection. Prevention and control relies on reducing the breeding of mosquitoes th...
Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks - December 21, 2015 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: pesticide [subject], insecticides, fungicides, risk factor [subject], risk, health risks, water [subject], safe water, wastewater, greywater, clean water, Disease outbreak news [doctype], Honduras [country], Region of the Americas [region] Source Type: news

Death Toll Increases in Fiery Maryland Crash
HYATTSVILLE, Md. (AP) — A passenger van packed with 16 people on their way to a service at their small, Spanish-speaking evangelical church in suburban Washington was involved in a fiery and deadly crash that police and county officials described as one of the worst they could remember. An elderly couple and a 6-year-old girl who were riding in the van were killed in the crash Sunday evening, the church's pastor said Monday, and another passenger, who was in the late stages of pregnancy, lost her baby. The driver of a pickup truck that veered across the center line into the path of the van was also killed, police sa...
Source: JEMS Operations - November 10, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: General News Mass Casualty Incidents Rescue & Vehicle Extrication Source Type: news

SLEAZE: Monsanto shill PR firm Ketchum also ran Bush Administration propaganda for the Honduran regime
(NaturalNews) A New York-based public relations firm that has been engaged in a number of controversies including conducting covert propaganda for the George W. Bush administration and buying scientists to act as shills for bio-agriculture giants has a new government client: Honduras... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - September 23, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Blueprint for Oceans in Parrotfish Paradise
The tragedy of the commons is thriving in our oceans. A fisherman aiming to maximize profit or provide for his family contributes to over-harvesting. A community looking to cut costs turns a blind eye to wastes entering coastal waters. Billions of people around the world make rational decisions like these every day based on their historical practices and economic interests -- and it's adding up to gigantic shifts in the abundance and diversity of ocean life. Achieving the United Nation's Sustainable Development Goal #14 will require nothing less than restructuring the relationship between humanity and the oceans. It is ri...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - September 21, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

A Mental Health Screening Intervention in a Rural Honduran Medical Clinic (Heena Panchal M.D.)
This is a screening intervention for anxiety and depression in a Rural Honduran Medical Clinic. Objectives are to learn more about existing mental health resources and do a community mental health needs assessment in order to evaluate and identify gaps of mental health in the community, using screening tools such as the Spanish validated PHQ-9 and GAD-7. (Source: Family Medicine Digital Resources Library (FMDRL) Recently Uploaded)
Source: Family Medicine Digital Resources Library (FMDRL) Recently Uploaded - September 21, 2015 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Alina’s story part III: Life after a heart transplant
The moment Alina Siman first opened her eyes after her heart transplant is a moment her parents will never, ever forget. “She saw her dad standing over her,” recalls her mother, Mary, “and she said, ‘Papa, Papa.’” Alina had been through quite an ordeal over that past year. Born with a congenital heart defect that was surgically corrected in infancy, Alina had been growing and developing normally until the spring of her third year. The active toddler’s seemingly strong heart began to weaken, and the situation rapidly became worse. Mary brought Alina to the Heart Center at Boston Chi...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - September 17, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Erin Horan Tags: All posts Heart conditions Our patients’ stories Berlin heart congestive heart failure Heart Center Heart transplant program Source Type: news

After Iran Earthquake, Building Disaster-Resistant Houses
Innovation often emerges out of necessity. Fostering innovation, a key part of Goal 9 of the new Sustainable Development Goals, can only happen if we foster innovators -- the people who will see solutions, who will see value and promise where others see trouble and decay, and put ideas into action with the commitment for sustainability. While it's important to create and name the goals we need for sustainable development, measures of success are harder to come by when we're looking at creative leaders launching new and often untested ideas. At Echoing Green, we've supported nearly 700 social entrepreneurs working in more...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - September 14, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Central America faces major crop losses due to El Niño, warns UN agency
This year’s cereal outputs in El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua have been severely reduced because of the dry weather associated with the El Niño weather phenomenon, the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) said today. (Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security)
Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security - September 14, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Vivian’s story: From baby with a cleft lip to confident adult
Dennis, Sylvia and Vivian Pereira with Dr. John Mulliken Silvia Pereira was pregnant for the first time in 1986 when a routine ultrasound revealed that she was carrying a baby girl with a cleft lip. In her early twenties and newly emigrated from Honduras, Silvia decided to keep the condition a secret because she was unsure of how her family would react. “I didn’t even know what a cleft lip was; I didn’t care how she came out; I just wanted my baby.” When baby Vivian arrived, her husband Dennis was in disbelief: “If you’ve never seen a cleft lip, it’s pretty shocking. I asked myself...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - July 7, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jenny Fernandez Tags: All posts Our patients’ stories Bonnie Padwa Cleft lip and Palate Program John Mulliken Stephen Shusterman Source Type: news

Virtual Assistant: a 3-D avatar, the best classmate for deaf students
Software that converts the voice into sign language is creating a stir in Honduras (Source: The Irish Times - Health)
Source: The Irish Times - Health - June 20, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Pregnancy and Childbirth Still Kill Too Many Women in Latin America
A grandmother with her daughter - a young mother - and other members of their family in Mbya Guaraní Iboty Ocara, an indigenous village in the province of Misiones in the northwest of Argentina. Indigenous people are among the most vulnerable groups in Latin America in terms of maternal mortality. Credit: Fabiana Frayssinet/IPSBy Fabiana FrayssinetBUENOS AIRES, May 14 2015 (IPS)In spite of strides in social progress, Latin America’s maternal mortality rates remain unacceptable, and many of the deaths are avoidable, occurring partly because of neglect of the prescriptions provided by experts: preventive action ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - May 14, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Fabiana Frayssinet Tags: Development & Aid Editors' Choice Featured Gender Headlines Health Human Rights Latin America & the Caribbean Population Poverty & SDGs Projects Regional Categories TerraViva United Nations Women's Health Source Type: news

Draconian Ban on Abortion in El Salvador Targeted by Global Campaign
One of her defence lawyers hugs Carmelina Pérez when an appeals court in eastern El Salvador declares her innocent of homicide, on Apr. 23. She had been sentenced to 30 years in prison in June 2014 after suffering a miscarriage. In El Salvador women, especially the poor, suffer from the penalisation of abortion under any circumstances. Credit: Edgardo Ayala/IPSBy Edgardo AyalaSAN SALVADOR, Apr 30 2015 (IPS)International and local human rights groups are carrying out an intense global campaign to get El Salvador to modify its draconian law that criminalises abortion and provides for prison terms for women.Doctors, fe...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - April 30, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Edgardo Ayala Tags: Active Citizens Civil Society Crime & Justice Development & Aid Editors' Choice Featured Gender Headlines Health Human Rights Inequity Latin America & the Caribbean Population Poverty & SDGs Projects Regional Categories Wom Source Type: news

East African Environmental Activist Wins Major Prize
By Lisa VivesNEW YORK, Apr 22 2015 (IPS)On Earth Day, Apr. 22, Kenyan activist Phyllis Omido takes the stage in Washington DC to receive the Goldman Environmental Prize for her efforts to defend her community from lead poisoning and force the closure of a lead smelting plant that was emitting fumes and spewing untreated acid wastewater into streams, poisoning the neighbourhood – including her own baby.Courtesy of the Goldman Prize.“At first we thought he had malaria or typhoid, but doctors found he was suffering from lead poisoning,” Omido recalled. The lead was traced to a smelter where Phyllis had recen...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - April 22, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Lisa Vives Tags: Active Citizens Africa Civil Society Environment Headlines Health Newsbrief TerraViva United Nations Goldman Environmental Prize Phyllis Omido Source Type: news

Bridges, Planes and Panic Attacks: Getting Over Fear
I'm not sure when I first realized I was afraid of flying but it wasn't long after I entered college. I'd worry for weeks and weeks as the departure date would get closer and closer. I distinctly remember having diarrhea EVERY TIME I'd arrive at the airport. I also remember seriously thinking "we're all going to die" when we'd board the plane and I'd wonder why other people in line didn't seem more concerned about this possibility. (The way my fearful mind worked, it actually seemed more like a probability.) And once I'd get to my destination I'd have to worry about getting back home the whole time I was away! ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 17, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Africa: Global Fund News Flash Special - World TB Day
[Global Fund] Elder Cualez has spent 11 years serving a drug sentence in a prison in Honduras. In its narrow and overcrowded corridors, he found his calling. Elder is a volunteer TB counsellor for fellow inmates, participating in an innovative partnership that brings together law enforcement authorities, local hospitals, churches and inmates to provide treatment to a vulnerable population that has long been neglected. "I saw the need. My fellow inmates were suffering," Elder explained. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - March 24, 2015 Category: African Health Source Type: news

American in Honduras checked for Ebola released from hospital
TEGUCIGALPA (Reuters) - An American who was hospitalized in Honduras pending Ebola checks has been released from hospital, authorities said on Saturday, though he will be kept under watch for 21 days. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - March 14, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

American in Honduras isolated pending tests for Ebola
TEGUCIGALPA (Reuters) - A U.S. citizen has been hospitalized in Honduras while he is screened for Ebola, health authorities in the Central American country said on Friday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - March 14, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

This Week in Science: Music for Cats, Capturing Light's Two Sides, and Smoking's Death Sentence
Seven days, lots of science in the news. Here's a roundup of some of the week's most notable and quotable items: Illustration by Sarah Peavey Cats prefer listening to music that's made for them--with the same frequency range they use to communicate and a tempo similar to purring. Scientists managed to capture an image of light that shows it behaving as both a particle and a wave at the same time. This may be the tiniest living thing ever captured in an image. A volcano in Chile erupted spewing lava with a vigor not seen in 20 years and possibly helping produce "shocking" lightning. Climate ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 6, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Archaeologists find two lost cities deep in Honduras jungle
Archaeological team say they have set foot in a place untouched by humans for at least 600 years in a site that may be the ‘lost city of the monkey god’ Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 6, 2015 Category: Science Authors: Alan Yuhas Tags: Honduras Archaeology Americas World news Science Source Type: news

Archaeologists find two 'lost cities' deep in Honduras jungle
Archaeological team say they have set foot in a place untouched by humans for at least 600 years in a site that may be the ‘lost city of the monkey god’Archaeologists have discovered two lost cities in the deep jungle of Honduras, emerging from the forest with evidence of a pyramid, plazas and artifacts that include the effigy of a half-human, half-jaguar spirit.The team of specialists in archaeology and other fields, escorted by three British bushwhacking guides and a detail of Honduran special forces, explored on foot a remote valley of La Mosquitia where an aerial survey had found signs of ruins in 2012. Rel...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 6, 2015 Category: Science Authors: Alan Yuhas Tags: Honduras Archaeology Americas World news Science Cities Source Type: news

Ancient City, Once Home To A Long-Lost Civilization, Found In Honduras Rainforest
A team of archaeologists were searching for the fabled “White City,” also known as the “City of the Monkey God,” in the Honduras jungle. But during the course of their hunt, they say they may have stumbled upon something far more remarkable: not merely a long-lost city, but an entire, unidentified civilization. The story of this discovery begins in 2012 when an aerial survey of a remote valley in La Mosquitia, Honduras, revealed evidence of the ruins of a pre-Columbian city. As National Geographic notes, some experts thought the ruins might be part of the legendary “White City.” This &l...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 4, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

The City of the Monkey God: Archaeologists claim to have found city lost for 1,000 years in remote Honduran jungle
The mossy carving had lain undisturbed for up to a millennium in some of the remotest jungle on Earth. It is a powerful effigy of a “were-jaguar” but also the pristine legacy of a vanished and - until now - unknown civilisation. (Source: The Independent - Science)
Source: The Independent - Science - March 3, 2015 Category: Science Tags: Archaeology Source Type: news

Has the legendary 'City of the Monkey God' been found in Honduras?
An expedition to locate the legendary 'City of the Monkey God' has announced the discovery of a mysterious culture's ancient city, according to National Geographic. (Source: The Independent - Science)
Source: The Independent - Science - March 3, 2015 Category: Science Tags: Americas Source Type: news

The Fabled ‘City of the Monkey God’ Has Been Found in the Honduran Rain Forest
An ancient lost city from a mysterious culture has been discovered in the eastern Honduran rain forest. Legend speaks of a “White City” or “City of the Monkey God” so remote that no one has ever found it, reports National Geographic. That is until a team of American and Honduran archaeologists returned from deep within the Central American nation’s jungle last week. The scientists found evidence of settlements and remnants of an unknown civilization that thrived thousands of years ago. Stone sculptures, ceremonial seats, carved vessels decorated with snakes and other animals made up a cache of...
Source: TIME: Top Science and Health Stories - March 3, 2015 Category: Science Authors: hcregan Tags: Uncategorized archeology artifacts cache central america City of the Monkey God civilzation Honduran Rainforest lost city were-jaguar Source Type: news

Mo Brooks, Ben Carson Share False Narrative On Measles Outbreak
The following post first appeared on FactCheck.org. Rep. Mo Brooks and potential presidential hopeful Ben Carson both suggested a connection between illegal immigration and the spread of diseases such as measles in the United States. Though it is often difficult to pinpoint precise origins of disease outbreaks, there is no evidence supporting a link between the recent outbreaks and illegal immigration. Brooks, a Republican from Alabama, was asked about the current measles outbreak in an interview with radio host Matt Murphy (at the 14:24 mark). The congressman said the immunization practices in the home countries of immig...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 5, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Preference for gravid females makes rare iguana consumption unsustainable
(Zoological Society of San Diego) The Valle de Aguán spiny-tailed iguana is a critically endangered species found in Honduras. A recent survey of people living in the region shows that, although residents are aware of the endangered status of the species, the iguana continues to be hunted for food. Of particular concern is the preference for the consumption of female iguanas that are gravid (carrying eggs in their body). (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 2, 2014 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The need for data in the world's most violent country - B-Lajoie MR, D'Andrea S, Rodriguez C, Greenough G, Rodriguez C, Patel R.
A call for more information about the occurrence of violence in Honduras; its risk factors; and the individual and social consequences. Language: en... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - November 16, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Commentary Source Type: news

‘Therapeutic Abortion’ Could Soon Be Legal in Chile
Alicia is one of the millions of Chilean women who have had an illegal, unsafe abortion because in their country terminating a pregnancy is punishable with up to five years in prison, regardless of the circumstances. Now the country is moving towards legalising therapeutic abortion. Credit: Marianela Jarroud/IPSBy Marianela JarroudSANTIAGO, Sep 24 2014 (IPS)Chile, one of the most conservative countries in Latin America, is getting ready for an unprecedented debate on the legalisation of therapeutic abortion, which is expected to be approved this year.In Chile, more than 300,000 illegal abortions are practiced annually &nda...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - September 24, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Marianela Jarroud Tags: Active Citizens Civil Society Development & Aid Editors' Choice Featured Gender Global Governance Headlines Health Human Rights IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Latin America & the Caribbean Population Poverty & MDGs Regional Cate Source Type: news

Approaches to Challenges in NCD Care in Rural Honduras (Wayne A. Hale MD)
A presentation on the challenges being faced by the Brown University Shoulder to Shoulder affiliate in managing the increasingly common non-communicable diseases in its Guachipilincito clinic in Intibuca' state of Honduras. The government's implementation of a primary care team in the area may be an opportunity to better utilize the clinic for chronic disease management of the local population. (Source: Family Medicine Digital Resources Library (FMDRL) Recently Uploaded)
Source: Family Medicine Digital Resources Library (FMDRL) Recently Uploaded - September 3, 2014 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Honduras: Prioritizing Care for Survivors of Sexual Violence
  Aurelia left for work at 5:00AM, when the streets of Tegucigalpa were still deserted. As she walked, a white sedan with tinted windows drew up at the curb. A window lowered, and Aurelia found herself facing a man with a gun. “He told me to climb in,” says 35-year-old Aurelia. “I tried to keep walking, but the car kept on following me. He said, ‘Climb in or we shoot you.’ One of the men got in the back and I was made to sit in the front. They taped my hands and my mouth and told me not to scream or else they would kill me. So I stayed very quiet so they wouldn’t kill me..." (Source: MSF News)
Source: MSF News - August 27, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Elias Primoff Source Type: news

Bioheart Announces World's First Combination Stem Cell Treatment
SUNRISE, FL--(Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) - Bioheart, Inc. (OTCQB: BHRT) announced today that it has completed the world's first combination stem cell treatment with Magnum Cell Therapies (Magnum) in Honduras. A patient with congestive heart fai... Regenerative Medicine, CardiologyBioheart, AdipoCell, MyoCell, stem cell, heart failure (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - July 24, 2014 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news