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Medical News Today: Hibiscus tea: Health benefits and risks
In this article learn about the health benefits and different types of hibiscus tea, the nutritional breakdown, and the side effects and risks. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

Tips for Reducing Worry
Worry zaps precious energy and motivates us to act against our best interests. When worry takes hold, our mental filter becomes clouded. Our mental filter allows our brains, when properly activated, to focus on relevant life-sustaining tasks and growth-seeking opportunities. When clouded, our mental filter negates what’s truly relevant and important for healthy growth and development.   Our brains function like computers, storing, processing and sorting through data at lightning speed, often on automatic pilot or on a subconscious level. However, when we are riddled with anxiety and worry, our capacity to think ...
Source: Psych Central - April 14, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Irving Schattner, LCSW Tags: Anxiety Relaxation and Meditation Self-Help Sleep Stress anxious thoughts Insight journaling Personal Growth Self Improvement Stress Reduction worry Source Type: news

3 Beauty-Boosting Benefits of Turmeric
by the Rodale's content team We're currently obsessed with turmeric. This powerful, brightly colored spice, extracted from the roots of plants in the ginger family, has been used for centuries in medicine, dyes, and an incalculable number of tasty meals. And these days, turmeric is really having a moment! That's because various current research studies have revealed the science behind the benefits of ingesting turmeric and its active ingredient, curcumin. Just a few of the health rewards these studies have linked the spice to are that it slows Alzheimer's progress, aids in detoxifying the liver and kidneys, and even boos...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 30, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Root water transport measured with hydraulic conductance flow meter
(American Society for Horticultural Science) Researchers used a hydraulic conductance flow meter to measure hydraulic conductance of container-grown herbaceous and semiwoody plants with soft conductive tissue. Chrysanthemum, coleus, hibiscus, and buddleja were grown in three different substrates; root mass and root hydraulic parameters were determined. Chrysanthemums showed a positive response with increasing root hydraulic conductance with increasing root mass. Substrates had an effect on root biomass of chrysanthemums, but no differential effect on root hydraulic conductivity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 5, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Pinkies Up! There Could Be Some Real Health Benefits To Drinking Tea
Tea gets short shrift as coffee’s milder little sister. But these leaves may have a lot more to offer drinkers than just their subtle taste. Large, observational studies have found lifelong tea drinkers are less likely to face early cognitive decline and get certain types of cancer, stroke, coronary heart disease, and type 2 diabetes. We should also note that by “tea,” we mean the leaves from the Camellia sinensis plant that are plucked and processed in different ways to make black, green, white, oolong and pu’er teas -- not herbal infusions like peppermint, hibiscus and chamomile teas. Researchers ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 25, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Pinkies Up! There Could Be Some Real Health Benefits To Drinking Tea
Tea gets short shrift as coffee’s milder little sister. But these leaves may have a lot more to offer drinkers than just their subtle taste. Large, observational studies have found lifelong tea drinkers are less likely to face early cognitive decline and get certain types of cancer, stroke, coronary heart disease, and type 2 diabetes. We should also note that by “tea,” we mean the leaves from the Camellia sinensis plant that are plucked and processed in different ways to make black, green, white, oolong and pu’er teas -- not herbal infusions like peppermint, hibiscus and chamomile teas. Researchers ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 25, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

The Four Pillars of Longevity and Well-Being
by guest blogger Pam Peeke, MD, MPH, FACP, best-selling author and expert on health, fitness, and nutrition When I began my undergraduate years at the University of California-Berkeley, I chose cellular biology as my premed major. Enthused as I was with each course, I felt something was missing. Seeking an answer to my angst, I'd often take long, reflective walks around campus, through eucalyptus groves populated by cackling blue Steller's jays and verdant gardens punctuated by bright hibiscus and bougainvillea. And then it hit me: The answer was literally right under my nose. Gazing at the greenery around me, I realized h...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 19, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Things We Leave Behind
We sold our house last week. There was nothing particularly earth-shattering about it. Houses are bought and sold every day, and we hadn't lived in the house for several years. When we moved to the suburbs a few years ago, we chose to rent our house instead of dealing with the tumultuous post-bubble real estate market and so, for the past six years, various groups of twenty-somethings have called our house home. Although we had great tenants over the years, for the most part, I was thrilled to call it quits with my role as landlord. And yet part of me -- a loud and unshakable part of me -- was unsettled and sad. Part of ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 7, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

8 Ways To Recommit To Your Resolutions
By Laurel Leicht for Life by DailyBurn A month into the New Year and you've already wavered a bit on keeping up with your resolutions. Work has picked up, keeping you at the office late, and you've caught up with old friends over cocktails -- plus, the football playoffs have meant beer and wings galore. Studies show that only 46 percent of people who make resolutions end up sticking with them. But aren't you tired of making excuses? Especially in January? We've made it simple to resume your healthy goals for the New Year. Just follow this step-by-step game plan to schedule your day -- from when to exercise to the best tim...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 31, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Brother of Hibiscus flower is found alive and well on Maui, Hawaii
Most people are familiar with Hibiscus flowers -- they are an iconic symbol of tropical resorts worldwide where they are commonly planted in the landscape. Only a few, however, are aware of an equally beautiful and highly endangered related group of plants known as Hibiscadelphus -- literally 'brother of Hibiscus.' Remarkably, in 2012 scientists found a population of these unique trees in a remote, steep valley on the west side of Maui. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - July 31, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Brother of Hibiscus is found alive and well on Maui
(Pensoft Publishers) Most people are familiar with Hibiscus flowers -- they are an iconic symbol of tropical resorts worldwide where they are commonly planted in the landscape. Only a few, however, are aware of an equally beautiful and highly endangered related group of plants known as Hibiscadelphus -- literally 'brother of Hibiscus.' Remarkably, in 2012 scientists found a population of these unique trees in a remote, steep valley on the west side of Maui. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 31, 2014 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Hibiscus tea is excellent to maintain healthy cholesterol and blood pressure levels
(NaturalNews) Hibiscus is a greatly appreciated herb that usually grows in tropical areas around the globe. It was first discovered in Angola but its pleasing taste has become very popular through time amongst the North African, Middle Eastern and even European populations. It just... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 27, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Edible flowers not proven to prevent cancer
Conclusion The current study has identified the levels of phenolic compounds in certain edible flowers. These compounds have antioxidant compounds, and antioxidants have been suggested to have various health benefits, including fighting cancer and heart disease. However, the current study has not assessed whether eating these flowers could have effects on human health, or at what levels they would need to be consumed to have any effects. A Cochrane systematic review pooled data on the effects of antioxidant supplements tested in clinical trials and found no evidence of beneficial effects on survival in healthy people or p...
Source: NHS News Feed - April 23, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Food/diet Source Type: news

Hibiscus Tea: Health Benefits
I was in Hong Kong for my Chinese book launch last month. Some days I was working from dusk until midnight, but some days I was quite free to roam in the city. On a scorching hot day, I visited Zen Organics, an organic farm, where the owner served me a cup of hibiscus tea. After drinking a sip, I told myself I had to write about this tea upon my return home. read more (Source: HealthCastle.com Nutrition Tips - written by Registered Dietitians)
Source: HealthCastle.com Nutrition Tips - written by Registered Dietitians - April 17, 2014 Category: Nutrition Source Type: news

Melanoma Succumbs To Natural Plant Substance Gossypin In Lab Tests
For the first time, using lab tests on cell cultures and mice, researchers in the US have shown that gossypin, a naturally-occurring substance found in plants, may be an effective treatment against melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. Hareesh Nair of the Texas Biomedical Research Institute, and colleagues, write about their findings in the April issue of Molecular Cancer Therapeutics. In their background information they explain that previous studies have shown gossypin, a flavone originally isolated from the hibiscus plant (H... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 11, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Melanoma / Skin Cancer Source Type: news

Embodied genealogies and gendered violence in Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's writing - Simoes da Silva T.
This essay examines two recent novels by the Nigerian writer, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Purple Hibiscus ([2003] 2005) and Half a Yellow Sun (2006), placing them first in a dialogue with each other, and more broadly with selected Nigerian writing on the Bia... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - January 12, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Violence and Weapons Issues Source Type: news