Synthetic Proteins Designed to Halt Growth of Cancers
Stanford University scientists have developed a novel approach to halting the growth of cancer cells while preserving normal function in healthy cells. The research was published in journal Science, and though it was so far conducted only on groups of cancer cells outside a body, the findings are incredibly promising. The new approach focuses on manipulating signaling pathways within cellular membranes that are involved in the growth of cells. Receptor proteins within membranes of cancer cells are often mutated or expressed in higher than normal concentrations, resulting in them effectively being “always on”. T...
Source: Medgadget - May 17, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Genetics Materials Oncology Source Type: blogs

Last Couple of Months in Oncology with Dr. Bishal Gyawali: March 2019
By BISHAL GYAWALI MD, PhD Hey, I’m back! Well, you might not have noticed that my blogs were missing for the last three months but anyways, its good to be back. I was having a little time off blogs and social media as I was transitioning in my career but now I am back. Sometimes, it is very difficult to manage time for things that you must do versus things you enjoy doing, especially when these two don’t intersect. For me, these last few months the things I had to do were all bureaucratic while I couldn’t find the time for things I enjoy doing like writing these blogs. But now that we are back,...
Source: The Health Care Blog - March 26, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Matthew Holt Tags: Medical Practice Physicians Bishal Gyawali Cancer drugs Clinical Trials Oncology Prostate Cancer RCTs Source Type: blogs

Last Month in Oncology with Dr. Bishal Gyawali
By BISHAL GYAWALI MD  Long list of news in lung cancer September was an important month in oncology—especially for lung cancer. The World Conference in Lung Cancer (WCLC) 2018 gave us some important practice-changing results, also leading to four NEJM publications. The trial with most public health impact is unfortunately not published yet. It’s the NELSON trial that randomised more than 15000 asymptomatic people at high risk of lung cancer to either CT-based screening for lung cancer or to no screening and found a significant reduction in lung cancer mortality rates among the screened cohort com...
Source: The Health Care Blog - January 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: matthew holt Tags: Research Bishal Gyawali Breast cancer Cancer drugs Clinical Trials health spending immunotherapy Lung cancer Oncology pembrolizumab Source Type: blogs

AI Doesn ’ t Ask Why — But Physicians And Drug Developers Want To Know
We describe phenomena using science, which gives us a sense of understanding and structure – yet we often lack actual understanding about what we’re observing, or why our treatments work. We have scientific explanations that may appear solid at first glance, but are flimsy upon closer inspection. More commonly, I imagine, we rely on scientific explanations as heuristics to enable us to get through our days, as a scaffold upon which to organize our information. I suspect AI is viscerally uncomfortable, and challenging to apply to clinical care or drug discovery (see part 2), because of the psychological importan...
Source: The Health Care Blog - November 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: matthew holt Tags: Artificial Intelligence Pharmaceuticals Physicians AI David Shaywitz Health Tech Source Type: blogs

Last Month in Oncology with Dr. Bishal Gyawali
By BISHAL GYAWALI MD Me-too deja vu I read the report of a phase 3 RCT of a “new” breast cancer drug but I had the feeling that I had already read this before. Later I realized that this was indeed a new trial of a new drug, but that I had read a very similar report of a very similar drug with very similar results and conclusions. This new drug is a PARP inhibitor called talazoparib and the deja vu was related to another PARP inhibitor drug called olaparib tested in the same patient population of advanced breast cancer patients with a BRCA mutation. The control arms were the same: physician ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - November 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: matthew holt Tags: Drug Discovery Pharmaceuticals Bishal Gyawali Cancer immunotherapy Oncology Source Type: blogs

Nanoparticles Encapsulating Chemotherapy Drugs to Kill Triple Negative Breast Cancer
The cells of triple negative breast cancer tumors don’t have receptors for estrogen, progesterone, and HER2, the main targets used to attack breast cancers. This is why they’re so difficult to treat, but researchers at George Washington University have shown that a technique of delivering a chemotherapy agent within specially designed nanoparticles can be very powerful against these triple negative breast cancers. The team, after much trial and error, concocted a formulation of the nanoparticles so as to have the greatest effects on the human cancer lines they worked with. Turns out the smallest nanopartic...
Source: Medgadget - October 3, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Nanomedicine Oncology Source Type: blogs

Risk factors for trastuzumab cardiotoxicity
 Click here for a preview Trastuzumab is a monoclonal antibody targeting the HER2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) used in the treatment of HER2 positive breast cancer. The drug when used in the treatment of early stage breast cancer, reduces recurrences by half and mortality by one third. But trastuzumab trials have shown severe heart failure or cardiac event rate up to 3.9%. Important risk factors for cardiotoxicity with trastuzumab treatment are: Age above 50 years Underlying heart disease or hypertension Baseline left ventricular ejection fraction 50-55% or lower Previous anthracycline therapy Referen...
Source: Cardiophile MD - February 26, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis, MD, DM, FACC, FRCP Edin, FRCP London Tags: Cardiology Source Type: blogs

The Skeptical Oncologist
By BISHAL GYAWALI, MD Why conduct post approval studies at all? Atezolizumab previously received accelerated approval in second-line metastatic or advanced urothelial cancer based on response rates from a single arm trial. The results of post approval confirmatory phase 3 are now published and demonstrate that atezolizumab did not improve survival versus chemotherapy (11.1 v 10.6 months, HR 0.87, p = 0.41). The concept of accelerated approval is to grant early and conditional approval and access to drugs in diseases of unmet need, and that the decision to fully approve or revoke be made based ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - February 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

I Am Very Confused
I realize this must be part of the vast conspiracy to keep breast cancer patients confused. Nancy, over atNancy's Point, blogged about theAJCC ’s Updates to the Breast Cancer Staging System, asking if we are confused about it. Well, since I didn't know about the updates (or even who the AJCC is) I was and still am very confused.Let's start with theAJCC or the American Joint Committee on Cancer. Apparently they are the people who set up cancer staging criteria. They set the original TNM staging system in 1959. TNM means Tumor size, Nodes positive, and Metastases. " The panel recognized the need to incorporat...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - January 18, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: breast cancer breast cancer treatment confusion staging Source Type: blogs

Waiting for Cancer Research
After 12 years (how the heck did that happen?) of breast cancer coping, I have actually seen some cancer research go from new or in clinical trials to become standard of care. This includes length of hormonal treatment for breast cancer patients. But it does not include many, many others.Some cancer'breakthroughs'are still in trials, or have vanished because they didn't work. They provide us cancer people with instant elation at the possibilities it hints at, followed by deflation as we realize it is years or decades in the future.An example of this is this news that at UVA they are working to find a wayto stop triple nega...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - December 4, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: breast cancer treatment cancer research clinical trials waiting Source Type: blogs

Quantum Dots Attached to Antibodies Seek Out, Light Up Tumors in Bright Technicolor
Quantum dots are tiny nanoparticles made of semiconductors that have unusual optical properties. In medicine, they may be very useful because they emit light when stimulated by electricity or an external light source, making them easy to spot in diagnostic tests. They’re more than ten times brighter than fluorescent dyes commonly used today, potentially allowing their use to significantly improve many existing tests and systems that rely on fluorescence. A major challenge of putting quantum dots into clinical practice is how to attach them to antibodies that seek out diseases without ruining the functionality of neit...
Source: Medgadget - November 20, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Diagnostics Medicine Nanomedicine Source Type: blogs

Tumor Size Doesn't Matter
This study shows that it's not only tumor size that is important for breast cancer patients but also tumor biology. All tumors in the study were small - less than 1 cm - and the lymph nodes were free of cancer (node negative), which in principle should be a signal of good prognosis. But nearly one in four patients - those identified as genomic high risk - derived benefit from chemotherapy. " "" " Small node negative tumors can be very aggressive, even if they are classified as clinical low risk, " said de Azambuja. " Tumor biology needs to be taken into account when deciding adjuvant treatment...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - October 11, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: breast cancer treatment cancer research tumor Source Type: blogs

Why a case report being circulated by advocates doesn't show that the ketogenic diet combats cancer
In conclusion, this combined metabolic approach appears effective in treating advanced TNBC, given this patient’s complete response with a good quality of life.Now, there is one thing that is interesting here. The doses of chemotherapy used were considerably lower thanwhat is usually used, with doses decreased by at least half or more. Does this mean anything? Who knows? cPR rates for TNBC have been reported to range from 20-35%. It could mean the regimen made the chemotherapy more effective, or it could mean that this woman just happened to have a particularly chemosensitive tumor. Even if we take this case report a...
Source: Respectful Insolence - October 4, 2017 Category: Surgery Authors: oracknows Source Type: blogs

Why a case report being circulated by advocates doesn't show that the ketogenic diet combats cancer
In conclusion, this combined metabolic approach appears effective in treating advanced TNBC, given this patient’s complete response with a good quality of life.Now, there is one thing that is interesting here. The doses of chemotherapy used were considerably lower thanwhat is usually used, with doses decreased by at least half or more. Does this mean anything? Who knows? cPR rates for TNBC have been reported to range from 20-35%. It could mean the regimen made the chemotherapy more effective, or it could mean that this woman just happened to have a particularly chemosensitive tumor. Even if we take this case report a...
Source: Respectful Insolence - October 4, 2017 Category: Surgery Authors: oracknows Source Type: blogs

We Can Improve Care Management
As a physician and CIO, I ’m quick to spot inefficiencies in healthcare workflow. More importantly, as the care navigator for my family, I have extensive firsthand experience with patient facing processes.My wife ’s cancer treatment, my father’s end of life care, and my own recent primary hypertension diagnosis taught me how we can do better.Last week, when my wife received a rejection in coverage letter from Harvard Pilgrim/Caremark, it highlighted the imperative we have to improve care management workflow in the US.Since completing her estrogen positive, progesterone positive, HER2 negative breast ...
Source: Life as a Healthcare CIO - September 12, 2017 Category: Information Technology Source Type: blogs

What Netflix can teach us about treating cancer
Two years ago, former President Barack Obama announced the Precision Medicine initiative in his State of the Union Address. The initiative aspired to a “new era of medicine” where disease treatments could be specifically tailored to each patient’s genetic code. This resonated soundly in cancer medicine. Patients can already manage their cancer with therapies that target the specific genes that are altered in their particular tumor. For example, women with a type of breast cancer caused by the amplification of gene HER2 are often treated with a therapeutic called herceptin. Because these targeted therapeu...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 4, 2017 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/elana-fertig" rel="tag" > Elana Fertig, PhD < /a > Tags: Conditions Cancer Source Type: blogs

Back to Breast Cancer Stuff
(So my plan is coming together and my life goes back to reflecting on breast cancer crap.)Earlier this week, the FDA approved a new medication to be used with Letrozole (Femara) or other aromatase inhibitors for hormone positive metastatic breast cancer patients. This medication (which I can't pronounce and just think of it as the'kis...') is calledKisqali (chemical name: ribociclib). It works similar to Ibrance... Not that that means much to me but as a reference.My real concern is the cost. Ibrance costs $9850/month for treatment. Not cheap. All new cancer treatments seem to cost so much. But I am pleased to learn t...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - March 18, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: breast cancer treatment cancer costs medication costs medications Source Type: blogs

Tucatinib (ONT-380) progressing in pivotal demo against HER2+ breast cancer
Stage 1 clinical trial data published this week in the journal Clinical Malignancy Research show early promise from the investigational anti-cancer agent tucatinib (formerly ONT-380) against HER2+ breast cancer. The particular 50 women treated had advanced despite a median 5 earlier treatment regimens. Twenty-seven percent of the heavily pretreated patients saw scientific benefit from the drug, with at least “stable disease” at 24 or more days after the start of treatment. These data led to two subsequent Phase Ib studies, resulting in tucatinib earning FDA fast-track status and the enlargement of this study on...
Source: My Irritable Bowel Syndrome Story - January 11, 2017 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Ken Tags: IBS News Source Type: blogs

You Don’t Have to Walk the Journey Alone
Stories like Melissa’s are why it’s more important than ever for LIVESTRONG to continue providing free programs and services to people facing cancer. Your generous support makes it all possible. And, when you make a gift today, your dollars will DOUBLE thanks to a matching gift challenge from the Shine Foundation. Your $25 gift becomes $50…your $100 gift becomes $200…even your $1,000 gift will become $2,000, all the way up to $25,000! Please donate now and share Melissa’s story with your friends and family. My name is Melissa Gilley and I am 58 years old. I’ve been married to my husba...
Source: LIVESTRONG Blog - April 18, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: LIVESTRONG Staff Source Type: blogs

Data Simplification: Hitting the Complexity Barrier
Conclusions have no value until they are independently validated. Anyone who attempts to stay current in the sciences soon learns that much of the published literature is irreproducible (8); and that almost anything published today might be retracted tomorrow. This appalling truth applies to some of the most respected and trusted laboratories in the world (9), (10), (11), (12), (13), (14), (15), (16). Those of us who have been involved in assessing the rate of progress in disease research are painfully aware of the numerous reports indicating a general slowdown in medical progress (17), (18), (19), (20), (21), (22), (23),...
Source: Specified Life - March 5, 2016 Category: Information Technology Tags: complexity computer science data analysis data repurposing data simplification data wrangling information science simplifying data taming data Source Type: blogs

A Year in Review: FDA 2015 New Drug Approvals
The approval of first-of-a-kind drugs rose last year to forty-one, resulting in the highest level of newly approved U.S. drugs in nineteen years. The total number of new drugs approved last year was even higher at sixty-nine. The rising figures reflect an industry-wide desire to research and develop drugs for rare and hard-to-treat diseases. The newly approved drugs serve to advance medical care and the health of patients suffering from many ailments, including various forms of cancer, heart failure, and cystic fibrosis. Additionally, more than 40% of the new therapies were approved for treatment of rare or "orphan&...
Source: Policy and Medicine - January 13, 2016 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs

What ‘Next Year’ Means When You Have Stage 4 Breast Cancer
Last year, I said I would attend this year’s San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. Instead, I’m sitting here in Michigan telling myself I’ll go next year. I’d better start making plans, because with metastatic breast cancer — also known as stage 4 breast cancer — I might start running out of “next years.” The symposium, which was initiated in 1977 and takes place in San Antonio, Texas, was developed with the mission of providing state-of-the-art information about breast cancer, as well as a collaborative forum for researchers and physicians. This year’s meeting...
Source: Life with Breast Cancer - December 10, 2015 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Kathy-Ellen Kups, RN Tags: Breast Cancer research Source Type: blogs

Why reform needs to start at cancer care
Recently, the clinically positive results from the CLEOPATRA oncology trial were released, showing that pertuzumab, when added to docetaxel and trastuzumab as first-line chemotherapy, produces an average survival benefit of 15.7 months in HER2 positive breast cancer patients. That good news notwithstanding, the authors calculated that Genentech’s price for adding pertuzumab to gain one quality adjusted life year is a breathtaking $713,219. In dry academic language, the authors dropped a bombshell conclusion. “The addition of pertuzumab to a standard regimen … for treatment of metastatic HER2-overexpressi...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 30, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Meds Cancer Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, September 30, 2014
From MedPage Today: Data Confirm Anti-ALK Activity in Rare NSCLC. Objective responses occurred in 72% of patients with mutation-specific non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with crizotinib (Xalkori). Case Reports: PET Imaging in Dementia. In two cases of progressing dementia, PET imaging with amyloid and tau tracers helped to clarify the diagnosis by ruling out Alzheimer’s disease. Screen for Pre-Diabetes, Experts Say. Four prominent diabetes experts have called on physicians to screen essentially everyone for pre- and early diabetes and to initiate treatment in those with these conditions. A New Standar...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 30, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: News Cancer Diabetes Endocrinology Neurology Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, September 12, 2014
From MedPage Today: Price Tag on Old Insulin Skyrockets. Retired nurse Mary Smith was having trouble controlling her type 2 diabetes on her regular insulin regimen, so her doctor decided to put her on something stronger. Bedside Ultrasound: Sorting Shadows. In medicine, we frequently propagate half-truths and unsubstantiated certainties. Thus, truth is a relative experience, dependent primarily upon how we choose to define it, rather than any concrete state of reality. Medicare GME $$$: What Should They Buy? Should Medicare start paying for health economists’ PhDs if they result in a better healthcare system? E...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 12, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: News Cancer Endocrinology Radiology Source Type: blogs

Real Time Big Data Analytics for Clinical Care
Over the summer, I’ve given many lectures about SMAC - social media, mobile, analytics and cloud computing.The most popular analytics topics are business intelligence, big data, and novel data visualizations.Recently, Dr. Chris Longhurst, chief medical information officer at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, and colleagues wrote an article in the Big Data Issue of Health Affairs, that suggests a very practical approach for enabling real time analytics within an EHR.   They call it the Green Button.The Blue Button is for patient view/download/transmit of medical records.The Green Button is for instant access to...
Source: Life as a Healthcare CIO - July 30, 2014 Category: Technology Consultants Source Type: blogs

Neratinib Comes Through For Puma
Yet another entry in the "Why do people keep investing in biopharma?" files. Take a look at the case of Puma Biotechnology. Their stock was as high as $140/share earlier in the year, and it gradually deflated to the high 50s/low 60s as time went on. But yesterday, after hours, they reported unexpectedly good Phase III results for neratinib in breast cancer, and as I write, they're at $228 or so, up about $167 per share. It's another HER2/EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (like Tykerb/lapatinib in the small molecule space, although neratinib is an irreversible inhibitor) and would be targeted at patients who are no...
Source: In the Pipeline - July 23, 2014 Category: Chemists Tags: Cancer Source Type: blogs

Medical errors - and what if they didn't tell us?
Massachusetts General Hospital archivesDr. Ernest Amory Codman. We all are aware that, unfortunately, medical errors can and do occur. A recent example is of this New Zealand woman who was never told of her Her2 positive diagnosis for two years and didn't receive the correct treatment until it was too late. But what if doctors never told us about treatment outcomes and what their error rates were? That would be pretty damn scary. No one likes to admit they made a mistake but as 'to err is human', it does happen.But that's the way things used to be:"Dr. Ernest Amory Codman was in his mid-40s when his golden career as a...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - July 22, 2014 Category: Cancer Tags: change medical errors Source Type: blogs

Trastuzumab and cardiotoxicity
Trastuzumab is useful for the chemotherapy of breast cancers which are HER2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor-2) positive, which constitute about one fifth of cases of breast cancer. Untreated, HER2 positive cases have a poorer prognosis than negative cases [Moja L et al. Trastuzumab containing regimens for early breast cancer. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2012 Apr 18; 4:CD006243]. Adding trastuzumab as an adjuvant chemotherapeutic agent for one year has a significant impact on improving survival in HER2 positive breast cancer [Smith I et al (HERA Study team). 2-year follow-up of trastuzumab after adjuvant chemotherap...
Source: Cardiophile MD - July 11, 2014 Category: Cardiology Authors: Johnson Francis Tags: General Cardiology Source Type: blogs

Major Driver Mutations in Adenosquamous Lung Carcinomas
The June 2014 issue of Journal of Thoracic Oncology (abstract) features a thorough study of major known driver mutations (EGFR, KRAS, ERBB2, BRAF, PIK3CA, AKT1, RET, and ALK) in a series of 76 patients from Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center with resected adenosquamous lung carcinoma (AdSqLC) by Wang et al. and compared this group with a group of 646 patients with resected adenocarcinoma (ADC) during the same study period.  This is a nifty paper that will serve well as a useful contemporary reference when you next encounter a patient with adenosquamous lung carcinoma. From their "Table 1" data, it is of...
Source: The Daily Sign-Out - June 23, 2014 Category: Pathologists Authors: Mark D. Pool, M.D. Tags: Lung Cancer Non small cell lung cancer Source Type: blogs

not as simple as it would seem
As someone living with metastatic breast cancer, I pay keen attention to the development of new cancer drugs. And of course I pay particular attention to the drugs that are likely to one day benefit me.I have been on Herceptin for 7.5 years. My response was rapid and complete and there is no sign that the drug has stopped working. That doesn't mean, however, that I don't worry about the future and how I will proceed once I come to the end of the line with this miracle drug.Enter trastuzumab emtansine, or TDM-1, as it was more commonly known. Over the last couple of years, I watched with great interest as clinical trials oc...
Source: Not just about cancer - June 2, 2014 Category: Cancer Tags: brain metastasis breast cancer cancer blog chemotherapy community fear good stuff health care herceptin lucky show and tell Source Type: blogs

For Immediate Rewording. Uh, Release.
Here's a nice look at why you should always think about the source of the financial and business information you read. It details the response to a recent Pfizer press release about palbociclib, a CDK inhibitor that's in late clinical trials. Someone at The Wall Street Journal wrote that it had "the potential. . .to transform the standard of care for post-menopausal women with ER+ and HER2- advanced breast cancer." Problem is, that phrase was lifted directly out of the press release itself (and sure sounds like it), and you really would hope for better from the WSJ. What we're seeing here is actually Pfizer's ow...
Source: In the Pipeline - February 25, 2014 Category: Chemists Tags: Cancer Source Type: blogs

I really hate it when they change their minds in breast cancer treatment
You know the story. You go through some oh-so-not-fun medical treatment and then you find out afterwards that maybe you didn't really need it. Well they did it again. The announcement was made at the Breast Cancer Symposium in San Antonio yesterday where the focus on less is more. In some ways I am for it.I am against over treatment. I have experienced some of what could be over-treatment for some women with breast cancer and am just as happy to never repeat it. Some of the recommendations are:If a woman is diagnosed with breast cancer which has already spread, is surgery to remove the original tumor really necessary? If a...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - December 12, 2013 Category: Cancer Tags: breast cancer treatment cancer research over treatment Source Type: blogs

Passports should be required for Cancerland
Cancerland should require passports, visas, and planning. Its a strange world of different cultures, languages, and mystery. The never ending wait until the next scan, procedure, adventure. We'll wait and see what the next tests show and then decide on the next steps. I have tried to describe it before but never come close. This is the absolute best description of life in cancerland in the hospital I have seen:"At diagnosis, incomprehensible words resound — HER2-positive, stromal, non-small cell, BRAF, astrocytoma, myeloma, lymphoma, sarcoma— followed by equally baffling prescriptions of drugs that have tw...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - October 16, 2013 Category: Cancer Tags: cancer treatment cancer bonds being a patient Source Type: blogs

Pharmalot... Pharmalittle... Good Morning
Hello, everyone, and how are you this morning? A strong sun and cool breeze are enveloping the leafy Pharmalot corporate campus, where we await the arrival of the grounds crew to tidy up. This may be a long wait, however. In the interim, yes, we are brewing a needed cup of stimulation - our flavor is the seasonal favorite, Pumpkin Spice - and we invite you to join us, as always. An extra kick at the start of the day is always welcome, yes? Now, though, the time has come to get cracking. So here are a few items of interest. Have a grand day... Glaxo Seeks To Market First Malaria Vaccine (The Guardian) The Shutdown Update On...
Source: Pharmalot - October 8, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs

FDA Approval Of Roche Cancer Drug Signals A New Paradigm
In a move that may prompt drugmakers to rethink development of cancer treatments, the FDA late yesterday approved the first medicine to treat breast cancer before surgery. Called Perjeta, the Roche biologic was endorsed as part of the accelerated approval program, occurring just three weeks after an FDA panel recommended use and a full month before the agency was expected to make a decision. The drug is intended for patients with HER2-positive, locally advanced, inflammatory or early stage breast cancer, who are at high risk of having their cancer return, spread to other parts of the body or of dying from the disease. Surg...
Source: Pharmalot - October 1, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs

don't assume i'm wrong about this
My recent medical experiences have made me a bit cranky. Today, I called to find out how long it will take to replace my port, since someone has to come pick me up. At the beginning of the call, I clearly explained that I was having my port replaced and that I needed to know how long it would take.Medical professional: "Are you getting a port or having one taken out?"Me: "Both."Medical professional (Sounding incredulous):  "Both?"Me: "Yes, I already have a port and it has stopped working. I'm having it removed and a new one put in."Medical professional: "Have you ...
Source: Not just about cancer - September 12, 2013 Category: Cancer Tags: metastatic breast cancer brain metastasis pissed off conversations cancer blog rants good stuff Source Type: blogs

Specialized Clinic Opens for Patients with Cancer of Unknown Primary
It has been predicted that oncologists would soon define the scope of their practices on the basis not of the organ in which a tumor has arisen (e.g., lung, GI, hematopoetic) but rather on the genotype of a patient's cancer. For example, an oncologist might treat patients only with HER2/neu positive neoplasms. A similar pattern is now being seen in the way that hospitals triage and care for oncology patients. I posted a previous note about how the University of Michigan now has a clinic for high-risk prostate cancer patients (see: New Clinic for High-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients at the University of Michigan). The sam...
Source: Lab Soft News - September 4, 2013 Category: Pathologists Authors: Bruce Friedman Tags: Clinical Lab Testing Healthcare Delivery Hospitals and Healthcare Delivery Laboratory Industry Trends Medical Consumerism Medical Research Source Type: blogs

New Breast Cancer Guidelines
The St Gallen International Breast Cancer Guidelines were recently updated to include the Oncotype DX test for breast cancer as the only screening tool for women with early stage ER+/Her2- breast cancer to determine the benefit of chemotherapy.On some levels this is great news but again it is not for all women. The criteria for the Oncotype DX test for breast cancer are:"You may be a candidate for the Oncotype DX breast cancer test if you are medically eligible for chemotherapy and:You have been diagnosed with stage I,II or IIIa invasive breast cancer.* Your breast cancer is estrogen-receptor positive (ER+) and Human ...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - August 23, 2013 Category: Cancer Tags: chemotherapy testing breast cancer treatment Source Type: blogs

Do Clinical Trials Work? - NYT
EVERY spring, some 30,000 oncologists, medical researchers and marketers gather in an American city to showcase the latest advances in cancer treatment.But at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology last month, much of the buzz surrounded a study that was anything but a breakthrough. To a packed and whisper-quiet room at the McCormick Place convention center in Chicago, Mark R. Gilbert, a professor of neuro-oncology at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, presented the results of a clinical trial testing the drug Avastin in patients newly diagnosed with glioblastoma multi...
Source: PharmaGossip - July 15, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: insider Source Type: blogs

Paget's disease if Nipple- Review
Clinical: Approximately 1%–3% of women with adenocarcinoma of the breast have Paget disease. Clinically-Paget disease has common dermatitis-like appearance, as originally described in 1874, when Sir James Paget recorded that such lesions may resemble “ordinary chronic eczema” or present as nipple erosion or ulceration. Paget disease often has a deceptively banal clinical morphology but should lead the list of differential diagnoses when evaluating unilateral lesions of the nipple–areola complex in adults. Paget disease presenting with nipple erosion.  Most women with the histopath...
Source: Oncopathology - June 28, 2013 Category: Pathologists Tags: Breast Biopsy Procedure Breast Carcinoma vs. Pulmonary Adenocarcinoma a common misdiagnosis. Source Type: blogs

Paget's disease if Nipple- Review
Clinical:Approximately 1% –3% of women with adenocarcinoma of the breast have Paget disease. Clinically-Paget disease has common dermatitis-like appearance, as originally described in 1874, when Sir James Paget recorded that such lesions may resemble “ordinary chronic eczema” or present as nipple erosion or ulceration. Paget disease often has a deceptively banal clinical morphology but should lead the list of differential diagnoses when evaluating unilateral lesions of the nipple–areola complex in adults.Paget disease presenting with nipple erosion. Most women with the histopathologic finding o...
Source: Oncopathology - June 28, 2013 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: a common misdiagnosis. breast Breast Biopsy Procedure Breast Carcinoma vs. Pulmonary Adenocarcinoma Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, May 6th 2013
Discussion Latest Headlines from Fight Aging! T-Regulatory Cells More Numerous in the Aged Immune System HMGA1 as a Potential Common Mechanism in Cancer A Skeptical View of Mitochondrial DNA Damage and Aging Protecting Cryonics Patients A Review of Adenylyl Cyclase Type 5 and Longevity in Mice On Extending Mouse Longevity Growth Hormone and IGF-1 in Aging IGF1R Levels in the Brain Correlate With Species Life Span Calorie Restriction and Calorie Restriction Mimetics The Burrill and Buck Aging Meeting, May 20th 2013 SENS RESEARCH FOUNDATION ANNUAL REPORT FOR 2012 http://www.fightaging.org/archi...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 5, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

HMGA1 as a Potential Common Mechanism in Cancer
Any mechanism that appears common to all cancers, or even just a wide range of cancers, is worth examination to see if it might serve as the basis for a therapy. Here is an example of speculative research of this nature: [Researchers] have identified a gene that, when repressed in tumor cells, puts a halt to cell growth and a range of processes needed for tumors to enlarge and spread to distant sites. The researchers hope that this so-called "master regulator" gene may be the key to developing a new treatment for tumors resistant to current drugs. "This master regulator is normally turned off in adult cells...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 3, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Hopeful Breast Cancer news
While breast cancer is generally pretty treatable (given early detection and regular exams), some forms of the disease are especially pernicious. Now, the Feds have "approved a new "smart bomb" drug ... that can help women with one of the most hard-to-cure types of breast cancer."Called Kadcyla, it attacks HER2-positive form of breast cancer; it's not necessarily a cure, but it does appear to add several months to victims' lives. It's actually a hybrid, combining an older drug (Herceptin) with the powerful chemo med DM1.Does it work as advertised?You be the judge:"In a trial of 991 women with advan...
Source: InsureBlog - February 22, 2013 Category: Medical Lawyers and Insurers Source Type: blogs

Important Guidelines for Choosing a Medical Animator
This article is a reprint from Pharmaceutical Executive Magazine and has been shortened for purposes of this blog. Want to learn more about effective visual communication tools? Our media partners, Viscira will be joining us in less than two weeks at the ePharma Summit. There's still time to register, as a reader of this blog you'll receive 10% off by mentioning code XP1806BLOG when you join. To view our full program, download our brochure. We hope to see you March 4-6 in NYC! (Source: ePharma Summit)
Source: ePharma Summit - February 22, 2013 Category: Medical Marketing and PR Tags: Digital Marketing for Pharma ePharma Source Type: blogs

Tamoxifen has my head spinning
Wednesday, February 20, 2013Current mood:  ScaredSo yesterday was my 6 month Oncology Checkup.  I loathe my 6 month checkups.  Not at that fact that I have to see the Dr. but at the fact that I have to step back in time and relive my cancer all over again.  Yesterday was particularly fun in the fact that I had to once again have a conversation about taking Tamoxifen....My cancer was ER/PR+ and Her2+.  I took precautions against the Her2+ part of my cancer and took a drug called Herceptin every 3 weeks for a year via an IV.  I did not experience any side affects with this dr...
Source: Sharing My Cancer Crapness - February 21, 2013 Category: Cancer Source Type: blogs

Tips for Maximizing iPad Effectiveness for Product Promotion and Education
Today's guest post comes from Noël Ashekian, Marketing Communications Manager at Viscira. She can be reached at nashekian@viscira.com With physicians being among the biggest adopters of the Apple iPad, it is no surprise that it has become a key part of a pharma sales rep’s toolkit. A 2012 Manhattan Research report confirmed that 65 percent of “ePharma” docs who met face-to-face with pharma salespeople used an iPad, representing an increase from 30 percent in 2011. Given the growing use of the iPad by pharma reps as a means to interact with HCPs, we thought it would be helpful to provide pharma bran...
Source: ePharma Summit - February 20, 2013 Category: Medical Marketing and PR Tags: Companies attending ePharma 2013 epharma summit Digital Pharma Marketing Source Type: blogs

2012: Banner Year for New Drugs
Fueled by new cancer therapeutics, last year the annual new molecular and biological entity approval count from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) saw its highest year since 1997. One-third of the novel products approved by the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) are used to treat cancers of the blood, breast, colon, prostate, skin and thyroid. As part of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) promotes and protects the health of Americans by assuring that all prescription and over-the-counter drugs are safe and effecti...
Source: Highlight HEALTH - February 13, 2013 Category: Medical Scientists Authors: Walter Jessen, Ph.D. Source Type: blogs

Herceptin Pricing In India Is A Joke: Menon Explains
Last week, the Indian government moved closer to issuing compulsory licenses on three widely used cancer medications – including Roche’s Herceptin – in hopes of making these treatments more affordable to a wider swath of its population (back story). The effort comes a year after India issued its first compulsory license for a brand-name drug, Bayer’s Nexavar cancer treatment, a move that has multinational drugmakers concerned. The cost per dose for Herceptin is roughly $1,400 per month, although Roche maintains it has taken steps to widen access, such as lowering the price previously and arranging f...
Source: Pharmalot - January 24, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: Ed Silverman Tags: Uncategorized Bayer Compulsory License Compusory Licensing Herceptin Nexavar Roche Source Type: blogs