What Causes Leg Pain?
Discussion “Growing pains” of the legs are a common complaint in children. Heterogeneous studies from 1928-2004 have found prevalence rates of 2.6-49.4% in children ages 4-19. The studies are heterogeneous because of time, location, and especially definition of growing pains. A study of 1445, 4-6 year olds in 2004 using a validated tool showed a prevalence rate of 36.9%. The definition of growing pains used by Peterson in the 2004 study is chronic “…intermittent (nonarticular) pains in both legs that generally occur late in the day or at night…” with a normal physical examination and l...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - May 19, 2014 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

What is in the Differential Diagnosis of Purpura?
Discussion Children presenting with rashes are common but certain characteristics may be concerning such as descriptions of petechiae or purpura. Purpura are characterized by non-blanching skin lesions between 3-10 mm in size that are caused by bleeding into the skin. Usually they are reddish-purplish hence the name purpura coming from the Latin word. Non-blanching lesions that are 10 mm are ecchymosis. Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is a generalized vasculitis that commonly involves the gastrointestinal tract, kidneys, skin and joints, and is especially seen in children 2-11 years old. Classically HSP presents with ...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - May 5, 2014 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

What is Acute Hemorrhagic Edema of Infancy?
Discussion The differential diagnosis for acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy (AHEI) is similar to purpura and includes: Vascultitis Henoch-Schonlein purpura (HSP) Drug induced Kawasaki disease Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever Trauma induced Infectious Disease Meningococcemia Sepsis Dermatologic Erythema multiforme Gianotti Crosti Hemorrhagic urticaria Sweet’s syndrome Child maltreatment Neonatal lupus Learning Point Acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy (AHEI, also called Seidlmayer or postinfectious cockade purpura, medallion-like purpura, or Finkelstein’s disease) is an uncommon, self-limited cutaneous leukocy...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - January 28, 2013 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Donna M. D'Alessandro, M.D. Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news