Cerebrovascular Disease Prevention as a Priority in Dementia Prevention
Disruption of the blood flow to the brain, either a slow decline in supply due to vascular aging, or following a stroke, is an important contributing factor in the development of dementia. The brain requires a great deal of energy to function, and thus the supply of nutrients and oxygen is even more critical than is the case for other organs. Reductions in that supply have consequences. Cerebrovascular diseases include a variety of medical conditions that affect the blood vessels of the brain and the cerebral circulation. These include conditions that may cause acute interruption of cerebral circulation and subse...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 23, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, October 12th 2020
We report that FMT from aged donors led to impaired spatial learning and memory in young adult recipients, whereas anxiety, explorative behaviour, and locomotor activity remained unaffected. This was paralleled by altered expression of proteins involved in synaptic plasticity and neurotransmission in the hippocampus. Also, a strong reduction of bacteria associated with short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) production (Lachnospiraceae, Faecalibaculum, and Ruminococcaceae) and disorders of the CNS (Prevotellaceae and Ruminococcaceae) was observed. Finally, the detrimental effect of FMT from aged donors on the CNS was confir...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 11, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

A woman in her 60s with chest pain and prominent J waves
Case submitted by Dan Singer MD and Ryan Barnicle MD, Written by Pendell MeyersA woman in her 60s with history of smoking presented to the ED with left sided chest pain radiating to the left arm and back, starting at about 1330. She described the pain as a " heaviness, " without exacerbating or alleviating factors. Her pain at the time of arrival was 10/10.Here is her triage ECG (no prior for comparison):What do you think?Findings: - Sinus rhythm at around 100 bpm - Grossly normal QRS complex - 1.0 mm STE in lead III, and just a hint of STE in aVF (both of which have to be measured just after signi...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - September 22, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: Pendell Source Type: blogs

ReStore Exosuit Shows Positive Trial Results for Stroke Rehab
Soft exosuits that provide assistive force during movement could be a game changer for patients with mobility issues. Such devices can help enhance rehabilitation and assist patients while they perform everyday tasks. The idea with such technology is that the soft suit feels almost like a piece of clothing and applies force gently and evenly to affect natural movement. This latest suit, the ReStore exosuit from ReWalk Robotics, has been FDA cleared for use in patients who have experienced a stroke and now have a mobility issue. A recent trial has assessed the ReStore exosuit in terms of safety, feasibility, and reliabil...
Source: Medgadget - September 15, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Neurology Rehab Source Type: blogs

Moral Distress and COVID-19: Worlds Collide
by Vickie Leff (@VickieLeff)As a clinical social worker, I am often approached by my medical colleagues asking for support and a listening ear around difficult cases, understanding their own reactions, team dysfunction, and moral distress. In the middle of this COVID pandemic, Social Workers, Chaplains, Nurses, Physicians, Respiratory Therapists, Child Life Specialists, etc. are all likely experiencing an increase in moral distress. This is due to the necessary change of focus from “patient-centered” to “community -based” approach, and resource allocation issues such as PPE shortage, health inequiti...
Source: Pallimed: A Hospice and Palliative Medicine Blog - September 14, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Tags: covid hapc hpm leff moral distress social work social worker Source Type: blogs

Survey finds ischaemic stroke and altered mental status as most common neurological complications in severe COVID-19 cases
This study provides valuable and timely data that are urgently needed by clinicians, researchers, and funders to inform immediate steps in COVID-19 neuroscience research and health policy. The Study in Context: Neurological Implications of COVID-19 Infections Three ways to protect your mental health during –and after– COVID-19 (Source: SharpBrains)
Source: SharpBrains - July 1, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness altered mental state brain hemorrhage brain-damage coronavirus neurological neuropsychiatric psychiatric problems stroke strokes Source Type: blogs

Repost: 63 minutes of ventricular fibrillation, followed by shock. What is going on?
In this study, 5% of VF arrest was due to PE: V fib is initial rhythm in PE in 3 of 60 cases. On the other hand, if the presenting rhythm is PEA, then pulmonary embolism is likely.  When there is VF in PE, it is not the initial rhythm, but occurs after prolonged PEA renders the myocardium ischemic.--Another study by Courtney and Kline found that, of cases of arrest that had autopsy and found that a presenting rhythm of VF/VT had an odds ratio of 0.02 for massive pulmonary embolism as the etiology, vs 41.9 for PEA.    ===================================MY Comment by KEN ...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - June 27, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

Serial ECGs highly suspicious for inferior OMI: Give thrombolytics prior to transfer for PCI?
One of my former residents texted this info to me with the EKGs:" I have here a 50 something-year-old female with multiple stents who presents with a concerning pain history. Pain relief with nitroglycerin, and I am starting a nitroglycerin drip. " I ’m worried about a hyperacute RCA infarct. " There is no old ECG available." I have to transfer for PCI, and am wondering if I should give thrombolytics first. "Here is the initial ECG:Inferior STE less than 1 mm, with reciprocal inverted T-wave and STD in aVL  I recorded this one 15 minutes later:Now with straightening of the...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - June 11, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

Blood Volume Analysis Using The BVA-100: Interview with Michael Feldschuh, Daxor CEO
This study highlights the value of our technology and its potential to improve heart failure outcomes. There have been dozens of peer-reviewed studies that have established the value of the BVA-100 test for clinical use, confirming that accurate blood volume measurement leads to better informed physicians, better treatment strategies, and improves patient outcomes and resource utilization. Medgadget: What are the problems with surrogate measures of blood volume that clinicians sometimes use in the absence of a device such as the BVA-100? Michael Feldschuh: Physicians predominantly rely on clinical assessment...
Source: Medgadget - June 8, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Anesthesiology Cardiac Surgery Cardiology Critical Care Emergency Medicine Exclusive Source Type: blogs

AI-Powered Teleradiology FDA Cleared for Triage in Departments Swamped by COVID-19: Interview with David Stavens, CEO of Nines
Nines, a teleradiology company based in Palo Alto, CA, recently received FDA clearance for their NinesAI medical device, which supports the automated radiological review of CT Head images for the possible presence of two time-critical, life-threatening indications: intracranial hemorrhage and mass effect. The technology can help radiologists in triaging cases. Nines is the first company to receive FDA clearance for AI technology that triages mass effect conditions. Teleradiology is an increasingly vital service for healthcare providers, whereby radiological images are sent to a radiologist in a remote location for analy...
Source: Medgadget - May 21, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Exclusive Radiology Telemedicine Source Type: blogs

Scores predicting bleeding risk in AF
Anticoagulation is vital for reducing the risk of stroke in atrial fibrillation (AF). There are several scores predicting bleeding risk in AF. These can be used to weigh between the need for anticoagulation and the risk of bleeding with it while taking an individualised decision. HAS-BLED: Hypertension, Abnormal liver or renal function, Stroke, Bleeding, Labile INRs, Elderly (>65 years), Drugs or Ethanol Abuse HEMORR2HAGES: (Hepatic or Renal Disease, Ethanol Abuse, Malignancy History, Older than age 75, Reduced platelet count or function, Rebleeding risk, Hypertension, Anemia, Genetic factors (CYP2C9 single nucleotide ...
Source: Cardiophile MD - April 14, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis Tags: Cardiology Source Type: blogs

ALPHASTROKE, A Better Way to Diagnose Strokes: Interview with CEO Matt Kesinger
Strokes affect nearly 800,000 Americans per year. One of the most important prognostic factors is the time from symptom onset to treatment. Currently, strokes are usually diagnosed by first-responders using a quick physical exam — a subjective method that can result in incorrect diagnoses, delayed treatment, and poor outcomes. Forest Devices hopes to change that. The Pittsburgh-based company’s product, ALPHASTROKE, is a portable triage tool that allows first-responders to diagnose strokes more accurately than with a conventional clinical exam. The company’s studies have shown that ALPHASTROKE can d...
Source: Medgadget - February 25, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Cici Zhou Tags: Diagnostics Neurology Source Type: blogs

World ’s First Portable MRI Cleared by FDA
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has revolutionized medicine, but MRI scanners are so demanding that access to them is still a challenge. MRI machines typically require specially built rooms with magnet quench vent pipes, entry systems that check people for metals attracted to magnets, and specific protocols to ensure safety. Patients, therefore, have to be brought to the MRI scanners rather than the other way around. This is about to change in many cases, as Hyperfine, a company with offices in New York City and St Guilford, Connecticut, won FDA clearance for the first MRI scanner that can be wheeled to the patient bed...
Source: Medgadget - February 17, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Emergency Medicine Neurology Neurosurgery Radiology Source Type: blogs

How would you manage this patient?
A woman was found outside with altered mental status.She was GCS 3.  BP 80/40Here is her ECG:Diagnosis?Sinus bradycardia with Osborn waves.  Temperature was 24.3 degrees Celsius.She was intubated (carefully, so as not to irritate her heart into ventricular fibrillation).She requiresinternal rewarming at this temperature.  External rewarming would be dangerous, as it results in both rewarming shock (hypotension/shock due to shunting of core blood flow to the surface) and " core afterdrop " (shunting of cold surface blood to the core, dropping core temperature).Because she has an appropriate blood pr...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - January 1, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, December 16th 2019
This study shows that CA are released from periventricular and subpial regions to the cerebrospinal fluid and are present in the cervical lymph nodes, into which cerebrospinal fluid drains through the meningeal lymphatic system. We also show that CA can be phagocytosed by macrophages. We conclude that CA can act as containers that remove waste products from the brain and may be involved in a mechanism that cleans the brain. Moreover, we postulate that CA may contribute in some autoimmune brain diseases, exporting brain substances that interact with the immune system, and hypothesize that CA may contain brain markers that m...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 15, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Cancer Survivors have Double the Risk of Suffering a Later Stroke
We present a contemporary analysis of risk of fatal stroke among more than 7.5 million cancer patients and report that stroke risk varies as a function of disease site, age, gender, marital status, and time after diagnosis. The risk of stroke among cancer patients is two times that of the general population and rises with longer follow-up time. The relative risk of fatal stroke, versus the general population, is highest in those with cancers of the brain and gastrointestinal tract. The plurality of strokes occurs in patients older than 40 years of age with cancers of the prostate, breast, and colorectum. Patients of any ag...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 9, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

A 41 year old with chest pain and a Nondiagnostic Triage ECG. Thrombolytics prior to transfer for PCI.
Conclusion:Transfer for PCI without thrombolytics is best if PCI at receiving facility can be done in less than 120 minutes from first medical contact, or less than 90 minutes from STEMI diagnosis in first ED.Thrombolytics prior to Transfer to a PCI capable facility, then rescue PCI if no reperfusion for STEMITRANSFER AMI(Cantor et al. 2009).High risk STEMI: BP less than 100, HR greater than 100 Killip class II, III, ST depression of at least 2 mm in precordial leads, ST elevation in right precordial leads (right ventricular MIAll patients get TNK-tPA.80-90% received clopidogrel 300 mg (75 mg for age over 75).Enox...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - November 7, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

A man in his 50s with witnessed arrest and ST elevation in aVR
Written by Meyers, edits by SmithA 50-ish year old man was working construction when he suddenly collapsed. Coworkers started CPR within 1 minute of collapse. EMS arrived within 10 minutes and continued CPR and ACLS, noting alternating asystole and sinus bradycardia during rhythm checks. He received various ACLS medications and arrived at the ED with a perfusing rhythm.Initial vitals included heart rate around 100 bpm and BP 174/96. Here is his initial ECG, very soon after ROSC:What do you think?Sinus tachycardia.  There is incomplete RBBB (QRS duration less than 120 ms).  There is diffuse STD, maximal in V4-V5 a...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - November 2, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Pendell Source Type: blogs

Plant-based diets are best … or are they?
This study is also a reminder that the health impact of a particular intervention (such as diet) may not be easy to predict or explain. In most cases, the risk of stroke and heart disease tend to rise or fall together, but that wasn’t the case in this research. Beware the study’s limitations This study linking a vegetarian diet with a higher risk of hemorrhagic stroke has a number of important limitations that should temper the concerns of vegetarians. The study was observational. That means it simply observed what happened among different people who followed different diets over time, without being able to ac...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - October 31, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Healthy Eating Heart Health Hypertension and Stroke Source Type: blogs

NICO Myriad NOVUS Provides Xenon Lighting for Brain Resections
NICO Corporation, a company based in Indianapolis, Indiana, is releasing its new NICO Myriad NOVUS resection tool. The FDA cleared product combines xenon illumination with NICO’s proven myriad neural tissue removal technology. Xenon lights reproduce the visible spectrum of daylight much better than most other bulbs, although LED contenders are now available, and so are often the optimal choice when working in a confined environment and where precision is key. The Myriad NOVUS is intended to help with intracerebral hemorrhage clot evacuation and subcortical tumor resection, whether using a microscope, surgical...
Source: Medgadget - October 23, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Neurosurgery Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, October 21st 2019
In this study, AT1-AAs were detected in the sera of patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and the positive rate was 44.44% vs. 17.46% in non-PAD volunteers. In addition, analysis showed that AT1-AAs level was positively correlated with PAD. To reveal the causal relationship between AT1-AAs and vascular aging, an AT1-AAs-positive rat model was established by active immunization. The carotid pulse wave velocity was higher, and the aortic endothelium-dependent vasodilatation was attenuated significantly in the immunized rats. Morphological staining showed thickening of the aortic wall. Histological examination showe...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 20, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Kelsey Moody Presenting on the LysoClear Program at Ending Age-Related Diseases 2019
Kelsey Moody of Ichor Therapeutics presented on the LysoClear development program at the Ending Age-Related Diseases conference organized by the Life Extension Advocacy Foundation earlier this year. LysoClear is an example of the commercial development of a rejuvenation therapy, taken all the way from the starting point of the discovery of microbial enzymes capable of breaking down certain forms of harmful age-related molecular waste that contribute to aging and age-related diseases. The actual research is largely done, and the task now is to focus on manufacture, regulatory approval, and entry into the clinic. Take...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 14, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Healthy Life Extension Community Source Type: blogs

AI competitions don ’t produce useful models
By LUKE OAKDEN-RAYNER A huge new CT brain dataset was released the other day, with the goal of training models to detect intracranial haemorrhage. So far, it looks pretty good, although I haven’t dug into it in detail yet (and the devil is often in the detail). The dataset has been released for a competition, which obviously lead to the usual friendly rivalry on Twitter: Of course, this lead to cynicism from the usual suspects as well. And the conversation continued from there, with thoughts ranging from “but since there is a hold out test set, how can you overfit?” to &ldquo...
Source: The Health Care Blog - September 27, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Health Tech AI Luke Oakden-Rayner Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, September 9th 2019
We examined human lung tissue from COPD patients and normal control subjects, and found a substantial increase in p16-expressing alveolar cells in COPD patients. Using a transgenic mouse deficient for p16, we demonstrated that lungs of mice lacking p16 were structurally and functionally resistant to CS-induced emphysema due to activation of IGF1/Akt regenerative and protective signaling. Fat Tissue Surrounds Skeletal Muscle to Accelerate Atrophy in Aging and Obesity https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/09/fat-tissue-surrounds-skeletal-muscle-to-accelerate-atrophy-in-aging-and-obesity/ Researchers her...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 8, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Greater Reductions in Blood Pressure in Hypertensive Patients Further Reduce Stroke Risk
The data reported in this study can be added to the considerable weight of prior evidence showing that greater sustained reductions of blood pressure in hypertensive patients is better for long term health. Blood pressure should be lowered more aggressively than has been the case in the past, in other words. This is old news in some respects. The medical community has already adjusted its recommendations in recent years, reducing the pressure thresholds at which blood pressure is considered harmful and a risk to future health. Raised blood pressure, hypertension, is very influential on the trajectory of age-related ...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 4, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

What is the differential of this very unusual ECG?
Take a look at this ECG first without clinical context:What do you think?There is sinus bradycardia with very unusual shortened QT interval (approximately 400 ms), for a QTc (Bazett) 358 ms. The T-waves have high amplitude and narrow bases, reminiscent of hyperkalemia, maybe also with hypercalcemia. The T-waves are not bulky or fat, and are therefore not hyperacute regardless of their amplitude.Short QTc is rare, but has been described as less than 360 ms for males and less than 370 ms for females. Furthermore, less than 330 ms (males) or less than 340 ms (females) can be termed " very short QTc " and, in the abs...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - September 1, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Pendell Source Type: blogs

Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 290
Dr Mark Corden Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 290 It's Friday. Boggle your brain with FFFF challenge and some old fashioned trivia. Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 290 (Source: Life in the Fast Lane)
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - August 16, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Dr Mark Corden Tags: FFFF 50 years acute eosinophilic pneumonia anaesthetics ASA boiled lobster coronary heart disease Death diffuse alveolar haemorrhage e-cigarettes emergency sedation fasting GRIM hypersensitivity inhalation injury mortality Pa Source Type: blogs

Are Radiologists Prepared for The Future?
This article originally appeared on Medium here. (Source: The Health Care Blog)
Source: The Health Care Blog - August 9, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Health Technology Medical Practice Physicians AI Alex Logsdon Artificial intelligence Radiology Source Type: blogs

Thunderclap headache: The “worst headache of my life”
Not all headache disorders are the same. An excruciating, sudden-onset headache known as thunderclap headache (TCH) is a medical emergency, very different from more common headache disorders such as migraine and tension headache. If you develop TCH, you should call 911 or immediately go to the closest hospital. TCH is associated with a variety of causes, ranging from benign to potentially fatal. Urgent evaluation in an emergency setting is needed to quickly identify and treat any underlying condition. Diagnosing and treating secondary thunderclap headache When you arrive at the hospital, the medical team will want to confi...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - June 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Aneesh Singhal, MD Tags: Headache Health Source Type: blogs

IRRAS Rolling Out New Irrigating Cerebrospinal Fluid Catheter System for Hydrocephalus
Swedish medical device company IRRAS is attempting to change the way neurosurgeons and neurointensivists handle the problem of acute hydrocephalus. Hydrocephalus is the abnormal accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the brain, and is often caused by hemorrhage, tumor, infection, or traumatic brain injury. Traditionally, surgeons use an external ventricular drain (EVD) catheter, that is placed into the brain’s fluid spaces to drain the excess CSF. However, current ventricular catheter technology is limited to passive draining of fluid, and catheter obstructions are not uncommon. IRRAS’ first commercial pr...
Source: Medgadget - May 9, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Kurt Yaeger Tags: Critical Care Neurology Neurosurgery Source Type: blogs

Snake Bite and Radiology
Discussion-Local manifestations of snake bite are soft-tissue swelling from edema, necrosis, and hemorrhage. Common long-term sequelae of envenomation is soft-tissue atrophy distal to the bite, particularly in the digits.-Systemic signs and symptoms after a venomous snake bite are due to anticoagulant/procoagulant activity or neurotoxicity. Cerebral hypoxia can occur due to hypotensive shock that may accompany some snake bite envenomations. Neuromuscular disorders with damage of the peripheral nervous system can with blockage of synaptic transmission, at either presynaptic or postsynaptic levels.Common neuro...
Source: Sumer's Radiology Site - March 21, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Sumer Sethi Source Type: blogs

Pseudo subarachnoid hemorrhage in post anoxic brain injury
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - March 15, 2019 Category: Internal Medicine Tags: critical care neurology Source Type: blogs

AI in Healthcare: Interview with Chris Gough, GM Health and Life Sciences, Intel Corporation
Intel has developed a suite of AI technologies and has been collaborating with numerous medtech providers to create new healthcare solutions based on data-driven strategies. AI has come on in leaps and bounds, and is beginning to make an impact in various healthcare fields. Intel aims to be at the forefront of this AI revolution. For instance, Intel has collaborated with Novartis to perform high content drug screening. The company uses Intel neural network technology to analyze thousands of images of cells to identify promising drug candidates. Previously, technicians analyzed these images manually, which was tedious and ...
Source: Medgadget - February 27, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Exclusive Informatics Medicine Public Health Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, January 14th 2019
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 13, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Is it Safe to Greatly Reduce LDL Cholesterol, Far Below Normal Levels?
The dominant approach to slowing atherosclerosis remains a mix of pharmaceuticals that can, separately, reduce blood pressure and LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) in the bloodstream. In the latter case, new therapies such as PCSK9 inhibitors and improved combinations of statins are capable of doing far more than just return raised LDL-C to normal levels. It is in fact possible to reduce blood cholesterol to something like a half or quarter of normal levels, and this produces incrementally greater benefits in reduction of atherosclerosis risk. But is it safe over the long term? And if it is, why did we evolve to have the observed no...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 9, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

The 4 Physiologic Etiologies of Shock, and the 3 Etiologies of Cardiogenic Shock
A 60-something presented with hypotension, bradycardia, chest pain and back pain.She had a h/o aortic aneurysm, aortic insufficiency, peripheral vascular disease, and hypertension.  She had a mechanical aortic valve.  She was on anti-hypertensives including atenolol, and on coumadin, with an INR of 2.3. She was ill appearing.  BP was 70/49, pulse 60.A bedside echo showed good ejection fraction and normal right ventricle and no pericardial fluid. Here is the initial ECG:What do you think?This ECG actually looks like a left main occlusion (which rarely presents to the ED alive):  ST Elevation in...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - November 30, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

NVIDIA Broadens Clara Platform
NVIDIA remains at the forefront of developing key artificial intelligence systems for radiology with their latest launch of the Clara Software Development Kit (SDK), which will enable third-party developers to build enhanced imaging applications with a series of accelerated libraries.The SDK is an expansion of NVIDIA ’sClara Platform, a GPU-based system comprised of both computing architecture and software development, which was introduced back in September as a part of its Project Clara initiative. Project Clara ’s objective is to help computing devices to operate in synchrony by expediting image quality and s...
Source: radRounds - November 29, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Near-Infrared Tech for Minimally Invasive Brain Monitoring: Interview with Philippe Dro, CEO of Luciole Medical
Luciole Medical, a medtech company based in Switzerland, has developed near-infrared sensors that can assess levels of tissue oxygenation as well as cerebral blood flow by measuring oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin. The sensors include a skin patch, which measures brain blood flow and oxygen saturation in patients undergoing surgery, and a minimally invasive probe that monitors patients with severe brain injuries or brain hemorrhage. Brain blood flow and oxygenation are both crucial for normal brain function. Reduced brain oxygenation can have significant effects, such as paralysis, speech impairment, cognitive impai...
Source: Medgadget - October 25, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Anesthesiology Cardiology Critical Care Diagnostics Exclusive Medicine Neurology Neurosurgery Source Type: blogs

A soaring maternal mortality rate: What does it mean for you?
Update: A new guideline from the World Health Organization (WHO) aims to help reduce steadily rising rates of caesarean sections around the globe. While crucial at times for medical reasons, Cesarean births are associated with short-term and long-risks health risks for women and babies that may extend for years. In June 2018, Serena Williams told Vanity Fair about her journey to motherhood, including the story of how she nearly died a few days after giving birth. In September, Beyoncé punctuated her Vogue cover with the story of how she developed a life-threatening pregnancy condition called pre...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - October 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Neel Shah, MD, MPP, FACOG Tags: Health Health trends Pregnancy Women's Health Source Type: blogs

A soaring maternal mortality rate: What does it mean for you?
In June 2018, Serena Williams told Vanity Fair about her journey to motherhood, including the story of how she nearly died a few days after giving birth. In September, Beyoncé punctuated her Vogue cover with the story of how she developed a life-threatening pregnancy condition called preeclampsia, which can lead to seizures and stroke. Throughout the summer, headlines like “Dying to Deliver” and “Deadly Deliveries” and “Maternal Mortality: An American Crisis” popped up on newsfeeds and streamed on screens across America. As a professor who studies safety in pregnancy, I ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - October 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Neel Shah, MD, MPP, FACOG Tags: Health Health trends Pregnancy Women's Health Source Type: blogs

Aspirin: Panacea or Piffle?
Aspirin is once again in the headlines, prompted by New England Journal of Medicine reports suggesting that people aged 70 years and older obtain no benefit and perhaps experience harm in the form of increased bleeding and increased death from cancer on low-dose aspirin. This adds to the decades-long debate on whether aspirin is beneficial as a preventive measure against cardiovascular events such as heart attack in which a blood clot forms on top of inflamed atherosclerotic plaque in the coronary arteries. Unlike many other studies that are observational and therefore virtually useless, these studies are prospective and r...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - September 17, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates aspirin coronary grain-free heart attack heart disease Inflammation platelets Weight Loss wheat belly Source Type: blogs

A physician ’s first financial advisor
I usually simplify things here on the blog.  Sometimes it is easier to glaze over a part of the story instead of pulling out all the details.  Others, the point is clearer when not bogged down by tangentially related details.  What’s lost in nuance, however, often adds shades of complexity to the picture.  Occasionally another viewpoint is suppressed on purpose.  I have frequently referred to the fact that I fired my financial advisor.  In the simple math of investing, his returns were slightly sub par.  But it may interest you to know that he was my second.  My first fina...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 23, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/docg" rel="tag" > DocG, MD < /a > Tags: Finance Practice Management Source Type: blogs

When Nurses Receive Their Due
Most nurses will readily admit that they didn't choose nursing because of the astronomically high paychecks. Sure, nursing can be a relatively remunerative career, but there are plenty of other professions that are significantly more financially rewarding (and free of some of the challenges that nurses face on a daily basis). So, what if nurses were paid a whole lot more in exchange for saving ---and otherwise improving---the lives of a grateful public?Photo by Thought Catalog on UnsplashMultimillion Dollar PlayersWe all know that entertainers and athletes make a lot of money, whether it's deserved or not. N...
Source: Digital Doorway - July 23, 2018 Category: Nursing Tags: healthcare nurse nurses nursing Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, July 23rd 2018
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 22, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Reviewing Waste Clearance in the Brain via the Glymphatic System
Clearance of metabolic waste from the brain via fluid drainage pathways is becoming an important topic in the context of age-related neurodegeneration, as is noted by the authors of this open access review paper. There is good evidence to suggest that drainage of cerebrospinal fluid is a significant path for the removal of wastes, such as the protein aggregates associated with dementia, and that the relevant fluid channels atrophy and fail with age. That decline may well be an important contribution to the development of neurodegenerative disease in later life, and the first efforts to do something about it are now underwa...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 18, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fighting Hubris in Medicine
By ANISH KOKA The weekend started with a tweet about an elderly man with atrial fibrillation.  Atrial fibrillation is an arrhythmia of the heart that predisposes those who suffer with it to strokes.  The strokes are a  result of clots being thrown from the heart into the brain.  The typical treatment for this condition in those deemed high enough risk is to thin the blood to help prevent these clots from forming, and thus reducing the risk of stroke. 101 year old with a history of a stroke stops his Pradaxa. Only other history hypertension. https://t.co/Ai5z519rcX — Anish Koka (@anish_koka) June ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - June 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: anish_koka Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

A Tale of 2 FDAs
By ANISH KOKA Frances Oldham Kelsey by all accounts was not mean to have a consequential life.  She was born in Canada in 1914, at a time women were meant to be seen and not heard.  Nonetheless, an affinity for science eventually lead to a masters in pharmacology from the prestigious McGill University.  Her first real break came after she was accepted for PhD level work in the pharmacology lab of a professor at the University of Chicago.  An esteemed professor was starting a pharmacology lab and needed assistants, and the man from Canada seemed to have a perfect resume to fit.  That’s right, ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - June 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: anish_koka Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

A New Target Mechanism for Lowering Blood Pressure in Cases of Hypertension
Hypertension, high blood pressure, is caused by arterial stiffness, which is in turn caused by a combination of mechanisms such as the accumulation of persistent cross-links that alter the structural properties of tissue, and chronic inflammation produced by senescent cells that alters the behavior of cells in blood vessel walls. Hypertension damages fragile tissues, causes the muscle of the heart to become larger and weaker, and ultimately interacts with the corrosive effects of atherosclerosis on blood vessel walls to produce a fatal rupture, leading to a stroke or heart attack. The work noted here is representati...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 1, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

The Ethics of Keeping Alfie Alive
By SAURABH JHA Of my time arguing with doctors, 30 % is spent convincing British doctors that their American counterparts aren’t idiots, 30 % convincing American doctors that British doctors aren’t idiots, and 40 % convincing both that I’m not an idiot. A British doctor once earnestly asked whether American physicians carry credit card reading machines inside their white coats. Myths about the NHS can be equally comical. British doctors don’t prostate every morning in deference to the NHS, like the citizens of Oceania sang to Big Brother in Orwell’s dystopia. Nor, in their daily rounds, do the...
Source: The Health Care Blog - May 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: at RogueRad Tags: OP-ED Uncategorized AlfieEvans Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, April 23rd 2018
In conclusion, a debate exists on whether aging is a disease in itself. Some authors suggest that physiological aging (or senescence) is not really distinguishable from pathology, while others argue that aging is different from age-related diseases and other pathologies. It is interesting to stress that the answer to this question has important theoretical and practical consequences, taking into account that various strategies capable of setting back the aging clock are emerging. The most relevant consequence is that, if we agree that aging is equal to disease, all human beings have to be considered as patients to be treat...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 22, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs