Eosinophilic esophagitis: A new food-related allergic condition on the rise?
In the early 1990s, doctors began describing a new condition affecting the esophagus of patients who were predisposed to allergies including food allergy, asthma, and eczema, and who were having trouble swallowing. Today, we call this condition eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). What is EoE? EoE is an allergic inflammation of the esophagus that causes a range of symptoms. Adolescents and adults most often experience it as difficulty swallowing, sometimes feeling like food moves too slowly through the esophagus and into the stomach. In some cases, food actually gets stuck (and may require urgent removal). Children and some adu...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - December 26, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Garber, MD Tags: Allergies Digestive Disorders Health Source Type: blogs

Graphene Sensor Inside Microfluidic Chip Detects Bacteria in Tiny Samples
Graphene, a two dimensional material made of a layer of carbon exactly one atom thick, has a variety of interesting properties. When used as a field-effect transistor, it can detect slight physical forces applied to its surface, making it particularly useful for diagnostics where targets are microscopically small. Researchers at Osaka University in Japan have now harnessed this feature of graphene to detect bacteria at very low concentrations, including H. pylori which is known to cause stomach ulcers. They created a new biosensor that uses microfluidics to position tiny droplets of a sample on top of a graphene co...
Source: Medgadget - June 26, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Diagnostics Materials Medicine Nanomedicine Source Type: blogs

MKSAP: 60-year-old woman with H. pylori gastritis
Test your medicine knowledge with the  MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 60-year-old woman is evaluated 1 month after completing a 14-day course of Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy consisting of amoxicillin, clarithromycin, and omeprazole. Initial upper endoscopy before treatment showe d patchy gastric erythema with no ulcers or erosions, and biopsies revealed H. pylori gastritis. Currently, she […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 16, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/mksap" rel="tag" > mksap < /a > < /span > Tags: Conditions Gastroenterology Source Type: blogs

Last Month in Oncology with Dr. Bishal Gyawali
By BISHAL GYAWALI MD Me-too deja vu I read the report of a phase 3 RCT of a “new” breast cancer drug but I had the feeling that I had already read this before. Later I realized that this was indeed a new trial of a new drug, but that I had read a very similar report of a very similar drug with very similar results and conclusions. This new drug is a PARP inhibitor called talazoparib and the deja vu was related to another PARP inhibitor drug called olaparib tested in the same patient population of advanced breast cancer patients with a BRCA mutation. The control arms were the same: physician ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - November 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: matthew holt Tags: Drug Discovery Pharmaceuticals Bishal Gyawali Cancer immunotherapy Oncology Source Type: blogs

Obesity, diabetes, SIBO . . . and hate?
Lactobacillus reuteri is an endlessly fascinating microorganism that can inhabit the human intestinal tract. This is the bacterial species we have been cultivating in our L. reuteri yogurt using the two strains, ATCC PTA 6475 and DSM 17938, that boost hypothalamic release of oxytocin and thereby smooths skin wrinkles, accelerates healing, turns off appetite, builds muscle, preserves bone density, and yields other spectacularly beneficial effects. Animals such as pigs, mice, dogs, sheep, cows, and birds have abundant quantities of L. reuteri (of various strains) in their guts, but only 4% of modern humans hav...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - November 3, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates autoimmune lactobacillus probiotic reuteri undoctored Weight Loss wheat belly yogurt Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, October 22nd 2018
In this report, we propose that the molecular mechanisms of beneficial actions of CR should be classified and discussed according to whether they operate under rich or insufficient energy resource conditions. Future studies of the molecular mechanisms of the beneficial actions of CR should also consider the extent to which the signals/factors involved contribute to the anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, anti-tumor and other CR actions in each tissue or organ, and thereby lead to anti-aging and prolongevity. RNA Interference of ATP Synthase Subunits Slows Aging in Nematodes https://www.fightaging.org/archives/...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 21, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Infection as the Link Between Cellular Senescence, Autophagy, and Immunosenescence
This open access paper reviews the interactions between cellular senescence, autophagy, and immunosenescence, with chronic infection as a mediating mechanism. Given the present state of knowledge and biotechnology, it is challenging enough to look at any two aspects of the aging body and consider how they might interact in isolation, but this can only ever be a thin slice of the bigger picture. All systems and states in our biochemistry interact with one another in some way, directly or indirectly, and examining ever larger sets of relationships between greater numbers of systems and states is the path to greater understan...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 17, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Unexpected Lessons Learned From the Wheat Belly Lifestyle
In the seven years since the original Wheat Belly book hit bookstores and turned the nutritional world topsy-turvy and millions of people have engaged in a grain-free lifestyle, many unique lessons have been learned. Even though I had engaged the practices of this lifestyle for a number of years and in thousands of people before I broadcast these ideas through books, expanding the audience to many more people yielded feedback on an enormous scale, new lessons that even surprised me. Among the new lessons learned along the way: Plantar fasciitis—I did not expect to have so many people report that this painful conditi...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - October 17, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates bowel flora gluten gluten-free grain-free grains Inflammation Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

The unique probiotic effects of L. reuteri
We’ve lately been discussing (some would say obsessing) about the unique benefits of consuming the microorganism Lactobacillus reuteri, specifically the ATCC PTA 6475  and DSM 17938 strains (available from Swedish company, BioGaia, as the Gastrus product). Benefits such as increased skin thickness, dramatically increased dermal collagen, accelerated healing, reduced inflammation, preservation or increased bone density, turning off appetite, increased empathy, facilitation of fasting, increased libido, etc. are all mediated via L. reuteri’s unusual capacity to stimulate oxytocin release from the hypothalamu...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - June 22, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates acid reflux Inflammation lactobacillus oxytocin probiotic reuteri Source Type: blogs

Who should NOT do the L. reuteri yogurt?
Because consumption of the L. reuteri yogurt made with the ATCC PTA 6475 and DSM 17938 strains work by raising levels of oxytocin (in addition to local probiotic benefits on reducing H. pylori and acid reflux, for example, unusual for its upper, not just lower, gastrointestinal benefits), there are people who probably should not consume the yogurt.. Oxytocin is a multi-faceted hormone whose levels decline as we age, much as does growth hormone and other hormones. But, among its many varied effects is the potential for causing uterine contraction. That is why oxytocin is administered to provoke delivery of a term infan...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - June 19, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Undoctored Wheat Belly Lifestyle anti-aging healing oxytocin probiotic reuteri skin wrinkles Source Type: blogs

Who should NOT do the L. reuteri yogurt?
Because consumption of the L. reuteri yogurt made with the ATCC PTA 6475 and DSM 17938 strains work by raising levels of oxytocin (in addition to local probiotic benefits on reducing H. pylori and acid reflux, for example, unusual for its upper, not just lower, gastrointestinal benefits), there are people who probably should not consume the yogurt.. Oxytocin is a multi-faceted hormone whose levels decline as we age, much as does growth hormone and other hormones. But, among its many varied effects is the potential for causing uterine contraction. That is why oxytocin is administered to provoke delivery of a term infan...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - June 19, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Undoctored Wheat Belly Lifestyle anti-aging healing oxytocin probiotic reuteri skin wrinkles Source Type: blogs

Precision Medicine and Public Health (from Precision Medicine and the Reinvention of Human Disease)
Excerpted fromPrecision Medicine and the Reinvention of Human DiseaseDespite having the most advanced healthcare technology on the planet, life expectancy in the United States is not particularly high. Citizens from most of the European countries and the highly industrialized Asian countries enjoy longer life expectancies than the United States. According to the World Health Organization, the United States ranks 31st among nations, trailing behind Greece, Chile, and Costa Rica, and barely edging out Cuba [42]. Similar rankings are reported by the US Central Intelligence Agency [43]. These findings lead us to infer that acc...
Source: Specified Life - February 6, 2018 Category: Information Technology Tags: cancer cancer vaccines precision medicine prevention public health Source Type: blogs

H pylori diagnosis: FAQs
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - January 24, 2018 Category: Internal Medicine Tags: gastroenterology infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Update on the viral connection to myeloma
Discussion part, perhaps this could be feasible in the early stages of the “chronic underlying infection”…But they also add that it might even be effective in later stages of MM. Boy, that would really be something, wouldn’t it? Here are some excerpts from the Discussion (my highlights): “Overall, our findings imply that chronic stimulation by infectious Ag may promote MGUS and MM in certain patient subsets. Importantly, some of the identified infectious pathogens (HSV, HCV, H. pylori) can be effectively treated. This observation has obvious clinical consequences, since the detection of MGUS ...
Source: Margaret's Corner - October 18, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll myeloma viral connection to myeloma virus Source Type: blogs

Bacteria Promote Cancer by Enhancing Stem Cell Replication and Turnover
Bacterial infection has been linked to cancer risk in some cases, and here researchers propose that this is because the bacterial species can cause some stem cell populations to replicate more frequently. Greater cell activity in this fashion over time raises the risk of a cancerous mutation occurring. The authors of the study examine only the one case in which a bacteria-cancer association is well studied, but we might speculate on similar situations elsewhere in the body. While it has long been recognized that certain viruses can cause cancer by inserting oncogenes into the host cell DNA, the fact that some bact...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 18, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Micromotors Powered by Stomach Acids Lower pH, Safely Release Antibiotics
Researchers at University of California San Diego have developed tiny micromotors that propel themselves around the stomach, neutralizing the acids within, eventually releasing a cargo of drugs once the pH is at a desired level. This approach can change how antibiotics and other pH sensitive drugs are delivered, as currently proton pump inhibitors have to be administered to reduce acidity before administering such drugs. The micromotors have a magnesium center wrapped in titanium dioxide that reacts with stomach acids, producing hydrogen bubbles that propel the tiny devices to swim around the stomach. The central core has ...
Source: Medgadget - August 17, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: GI Medicine Nanomedicine Source Type: blogs

H. pylori, a true stomach “bug”: Who should doctors test and treat?
In 1982, two Australian scientists discovered that a certain bacterium, Helicobacter pylori, was a common cause of persistent stomach inflammation and stomach ulcers. This realization revolutionized ulcer treatment. While fairly common, this infection usually causes no symptoms, but it can sometimes lead to ulcers in the stomach or the very first part of the small intestine (duodenum), and to certain types of stomach cancer. There is also evidence linking H. pylori infection to other conditions like iron-deficiency anemia and vitamin B12 deficiency. The bacteria are thought to spread through contaminated water, vomit, or f...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - April 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Wynne Armand, MD Tags: Digestive Disorders Health Infectious diseases Tests and procedures Source Type: blogs

Stem Cells from Young Mice Heal Stomach Ulcers in Old Mice
When it comes to the question of whether young stem cells and a young tissue environment are necessary for the success of stem cell therapies, there is evidence to support all of the possible answers. It is a confusing picture at the moment, and it is very possible that the answer varies by cell type. Since the best option for therapy is to use the patient's own cells, it would be good to find that cell therapies can work effectively and produce meaningful benefits even when both cells and patient are old. In some studies researchers have seen little difference in short term outcomes between young and old individuals, whic...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 17, 2016 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Is Your Antacid Medication Ruining Your Gut?
Proton Pump Inhibitors are a class of Antacid Medication that are so common and considered to be so safe that they were even declassified as prescription drugs and are now available over-the-counter so that anyone can use them if they happen to have heartburn. With names like Omeprazole, Nexium, and Prilosec, the ‘little purple pill’ is advertised everywhere on billboards and TV ads with barely a mention that their might be consequences to suppressing stomach acid. There are consequences of any Acid Reflux Medication, however, like the Side Effects of Omeprazole and other proton pump inhibitors can lead to oste...
Source: Immune Health Blog - March 2, 2016 Category: Nutrition Authors: Kerri Knox, RN Tags: Digestive Health Infections Source Type: blogs

Can Your Antacid Cause Alzheimer’s Disease?
Can your antacid really cause Alzheimer’s Disease? Recent research suggests that, indeed, proton pump inhibitors, some of the most common drugs for reducing feelings of heartburn, can cause an increase in the ‘beta amyloid’ deposits in the brain that are indicative of Alzheimer’s Disease. This is in addition to some of the other serious Proton Pump Inhibitor Side Effects, like osteoporosis, magnesium deficiency and  heart rhythm problems; Antacid Medications can Even Ruin Your Gut. These problems can occur even when these heartburn relieving drugs are taken for short amounts of time. All too of...
Source: Immune Health Blog - February 26, 2016 Category: Nutrition Authors: Kerri Knox, RN Tags: Brain Health/ Neurologic Digestive Health Vitamin B12 alzheimers disease causes cause alzheimer's disease cause of alzheimers disease causes of alzheimers omeprazole side effects proton pump inhibitors proton pump inhibitors cause alzhei Source Type: blogs

Can Your Antacid Cause Alzheimer ’s Disease?
Can your antacid really cause Alzheimer’s Disease? Recent research suggests that, indeed, proton pump inhibitors, some of the most common drugs for reducing feelings of heartburn, can cause an increase in the ‘beta amyloid’ deposits in the brain that are indicative of Alzheimer’s Disease. This is in addition to some of the other serious Proton Pump Inhibitor Side Effects, like osteoporosis, magnesium deficiency and  heart rhythm problems; Antacid Medications can Even Ruin Your Gut. These problems can occur even when these heartburn relieving drugs are taken for short amounts of time. All too of...
Source: Immune Health Blog - February 26, 2016 Category: Nutrition Authors: Kerri Knox, RN Tags: Brain Health/ Neurologic Digestive Health Vitamin B12 alzheimers disease causes cause alzheimer's disease cause of alzheimers disease causes of alzheimers omeprazole side effects proton pump inhibitors proton pump inhibitors cause alzhei Source Type: blogs

Can Your Antacid Cause Alzheimer ’s Disease?
Can your antacid really cause Alzheimer’s Disease? Recent research suggests that, indeed, proton pump inhibitors, some of the most common drugs for reducing feelings of heartburn, can cause an increase in the ‘beta amyloid’ deposits in the brain that are indicative of Alzheimer’s Disease. This is in addition to some of the other serious Proton Pump Inhibitor Side Effects, like osteoporosis, magnesium deficiency and  heart rhythm problems; Antacid Medications can Even Ruin Your Gut. These problems can occur even when these heartburn relieving drugs are taken for short amounts of time. All too of...
Source: Immune Health Blog - February 26, 2016 Category: Nutrition Authors: Kerri Knox, RN Tags: Brain Health/ Neurologic Digestive Health Vitamin B12 alzheimers disease causes cause alzheimer's disease cause of alzheimers disease causes of alzheimers omeprazole side effects proton pump inhibitors proton pump inhibitors cause alzhei Source Type: blogs

The Ten Worst Wellness Programs and What They Do to Harm Employees
By AL LEWIS and VIK KHANNA If corporate wellness didn’t already exist, no one would invent it.  In that sense, it’s a little like communism, baseball, or Outlook. After all, why would any company want to purchase programs that damage morale,reduce productivity, drive costs up…and don’t work 90%-95% of the time?  And that’s according to the proponents.  What the critics say can’t be repeated in a family publication such as ours. Still, those are the employers’ problems. However, the employers’ problems become the employees’ problems when employees ar...
Source: The Health Care Blog - December 4, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: THCB Al Lewis Vik Khanna Wellness Source Type: blogs

Best Posts on Aging with HIV from TheBody.com This Week
Forum on Aging With HIV: H. Pylori and HIV: What Do I Need to Know? (Editor's Pick)               Forum on Aging With HIV: H. Pylori and HIV: What Do I ... I am very familiar with H. Pylori. I was diagnosed with it using a urea breath test 2 years ago when I was diagnosed with lymphoma on the stomach wall. This was cau... View on www.thebody.com Preview by Yahoo   (Source: Nelson Vergel's HIV Blog)
Source: Nelson Vergel's HIV Blog - September 12, 2015 Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Nelson Vergel Source Type: blogs

Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 115
Just when you thought your brain could unwind on a Friday, you realise that it would rather be challenged with some good old-fashioned medical trivia…introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 115 Question 1 Dr Jerri Nielsen FitzGerald ran into trouble when she was stationed in Antarctica in 1999. What condition did she face and had to treat herself for? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer expand(document.getElementById('ddet1636854385'));expand(document.getElementById('ddetlink1636854385')) Breast cancer. Dr Fitzgerald had to perform a biopsy with the help of non-medical staff, and treated herself with chemother...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - September 4, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Niall Hamilton Tags: Frivolous Friday Five appendicitis breast cancer dr Beecher Dr Jerri Nielsen FitzGerald FFFF Forssman morphine pink lady placebo saline vibrations Source Type: blogs

Body Respect disrupts business as usual to advance nutritional wellbeing for all
How do we get from calorie counting and food preoccupation to relishing eating and enjoying body confidence? I’ll share three ways in which putting body respect at the centre can help turn the tide on body shame, weight stigma and rising health inequalities and promote enjoyable eating, and nutrition justice. A powerful first step is to bring body knowledge back in to view. It’s traditional to teach cognitive restraint and willpower in pursuit of healthy eating, but this all too often backfires. Rational knowledge has its place – just ask someone living with a peanut allergy – but food rules become ...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - August 27, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Food Nutrition Source Type: blogs

How to teach clinical medicine – lessons learned by studying sore throats for 35 years
35 years ago I started collecting data in a non-acute emergency room. Over approximately 3 months the residents enrolled slightly more than 300 patients into the initial sore throat study. Spending the next 3 months learning how to analyze the data, I began a long journey that continues today. Learning medicine rarely includes having epiphanies. Learning medicine requires patients and reading. But we who teach medicine can help our learners speed that process if we help them focus on some key features. My colleagues and I often cite Judy Bowen’s classic article – Bowen, Judith L. “Educational strategies...
Source: DB's Medical Rants - June 4, 2015 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: rcentor Tags: Attending Rounds Medical Rants Source Type: blogs

Lyme Disease: The Great Imitator
Spring is my favorite season. Warmer weather, budding flowers and lots of greenery in yards, gardens and parks encourages outside activities and fills me with energy. The spring season also brings out lots of crawling and flying critters like bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds, as well as some of the more unpleasant pests like ticks and mosquitos. If you enjoy spending time outside like I do, hiking, gardening or walking the dog, be aware that ticks and their bites can be not only annoying, but dangerous. Jana’s Experience Jana Braden found out how dangerous tick bites can be the hard way. She enjoyed the outdoors a...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - May 13, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Chronic Conditions Source Type: blogs

How influenza virus infection might lead to gastrointestinal symptoms
Human influenza viruses replicate almost exclusively in the respiratory tract, yet infected individuals may also have gastrointestinal symptoms such as vomiting and diarrhea. In mice, intestinal injury occurs in the absence of viral replication, and is a consequence of viral depletion of the gut microbiota. Intranasal inoculation of mice with the PR8 strain of influenza virus leads to injury of both the lung and the intestinal tract, the latter accompanied by mild diarrhea. While influenza virus clearly replicates in the lung of infected mice, no replication was observed in the intestinal tract. Therefore injury ...
Source: virology blog - December 10, 2014 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Basic virology Information CD4 common mucosal immune system diarrhea gastrointestinal gut influenza interferon intestine microbiome T helper cells Th17 cells viral virus vomiting Source Type: blogs

How the costs of care impacted H. pylori treatment
There he sat, hunched over with rugged, muscular arms stretched across his abdomen, his weary eyes stealing hopeful glances from behind an otherwise steely facade. Mr. J was a 53-year-old Latino agricultural laborer with a history of H. pylori who presented at our student-run free clinic with persistent abdominal pain, unchanged from his multiple previous visits. As I learned more about Mr. J and his story, I realized that treating him effectively would require understanding not only his medical complaints, but also his broader socioeconomic context. Working at a student-run free clinic serving a largely uninsured immigran...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 5, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician GI Medications Source Type: blogs

Helicobacter pylori
has been associated with the colonization of gastro duodenal mucosa of humans from millions of years. The central burden of the disease is in the developing countries, due to overcrowding and poor hygiene. Wherever it is found, if...(read more) (Source: David Plaut: Off the Cuff)
Source: David Plaut: Off the Cuff - June 9, 2014 Category: Pathologists Authors: David Plaut Tags: Microbiology Source Type: blogs

ASH 2013 - Chronic Infection, MGUS, & Myeloma
Paper 3116: Chronic Infection, a Neglected Cause Of Development Of Monoclonal Gammopathy Of Undetermined Significance (MGUS) and Myeloma According to this French paper, it is well known that certain chronic infections can cause lymphomas and chronic leukemia, because the infection annoys the cells until they ultimately make a mistake and become malignant (my words - theirs are undoubtedly more clinically correct but well above my pay grade).  Apparently, something similar can happen to our plasma cells, turning them into malignant myeloma cells. Indeed, the International Myeloma Foundation says "Several studies...
Source: Myeloma Hope - December 11, 2013 Category: Cancer Source Type: blogs

Insights and diagnosis
Seeing What Others Don’t: The Remarkable Ways We Gain Insights In the past I have written about Gary Klein. He helped create and popularize naturalistic decision making. Rather than explore decision making through contrived mental exercises, he prefers to observe decision making in the field and make inferences from those observations. His approach focuses more on how experts get things right, rather than the types of errors that we make. His new book ostensibly focuses on a completely new concept, how we get insights. He defines insights with this quote: Intuition is the use of patterns they’ve already burned,...
Source: DB's Medical Rants - August 27, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: rcentor Tags: Medical Rants Source Type: blogs

BreathID Hp Non-Invasively Test Spots H. Pylori in Exhaled Breath
It took Nobel Prize-winning scientific work to make the bacteria Helicobacter pylori famous. Able to survive in the highly acidic environment of the stomach, it has been found to be the common cause of many peptic ulcers, so detecting its presence can help prevent and treat a disease that affects approximately 4.5 million people in the United States annually. We’ve been following the BreathID device from Exalenz Bioscience for a few years now (flashbacks below) as it’s been going through clinical trials, and now the company is reporting that its BreathID Hp test for H. pylori is now being made available globall...
Source: Medgadget - July 31, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Editors Tags: GI Pathology Source Type: blogs

Peptic Ulcer Disease
Pathophysiology of Peptic Ulcer Disease 1) peptic ulcer disease is marked by a break in mucosal lining of stomach and duodenum 2) main causes are infection with Helicobacter pylori and use of NSAIDs Signs and Symptoms 1) burning epigastric pain relieved by antacids and eating 2) epigastric pain causing patient to wake up in the middle of the night 3) chest pain mimicking angina 4) epigastric tenderness 5) gastrointestinal bleeding (15%) with coffee-ground emesis or vomiting bright red blood or lower gastrointestinal bleeding 6) perforation (8%) with peritonitis and rigid abdomen 7) duodenal obstruction (3%) with nausea and...
Source: Inside Surgery - February 24, 2013 Category: Surgeons Authors: Editor Tags: Gastroenterology Source Type: blogs

Helicobacter pylori Transcriptional Network
from Alberto Danielli and Vincenzo Scarlato writing in Bacterial Gene Regulation and Transcriptional Networks:The human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori appears to enroll only 17 transcriptional regulators to transduce environmental signals into coordinated output expression of the genome. We show that the low number of transcriptional regulators, together with the large body of molecular tools, set H. pylori as appealing model organism to characterize transcriptional network structures involved in virulence regulation and host-pathogen interactions. In particular we provide evidence that the regulators are wired in a ...
Source: Microbiology Blog: The weblog for microbiologists. - January 30, 2013 Category: Microbiology Source Type: blogs

Bacterial Toxins
Thomas Proft presents a new book on Bacterial Toxins: Genetics, Cellular Biology and Practical Applications This timely volume serves as an update on the most important recent advances in the genetics, cellular biology and practical applications of the most important bacterial toxins. Written by internationally respected scientists from eight different countries, topics reviewed include: the molecular basis and risk factors for verotoxin pathogenesis; molecular mechanisms of Helicobacter pylori CagA translocation and function; structure and mechanisms of action of pore-forming toxins; bacterial enterotoxins as immunomodula...
Source: Microbiology Blog: The weblog for microbiologists. - January 25, 2013 Category: Microbiology Tags: Microbiology publications Bacteriology publications Molecular Biology publications Source Type: blogs