Infectious Diseases A-Z: Preparing for the next flu season
The current influenza?season, dominated by the A H3N2 virus, continues to be active, though it's on the downswing across the nation, says the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Data collected by the CDC show this season's influenza vaccine?is 48 percent effective in preventing influenza. Dr. Pritish Tosh, an infectious diseases specialist at Mayo [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - March 20, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

In a bad flu season, high-dose flu vaccine appeared better at preventing deaths in seniors
Older adults are at high risk for serious complications from flu and account for a majority of flu-related deaths and hospitalizations. H3N2 influenza viruses typically hit this age group particularly hard and have been associated with higher mortality than infections by H1N1 or influenza B viruses. During the 2012-2013 season, when H3N2 viruses were dominant, high-dose flu vaccine was 36 percent more effective at preventing deaths in the Medicare beneficiaries studied, compared to standard-dose vaccine. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 2, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

In a bad flu season, high-dose flu vaccine appeared better at preventing deaths in seniors
(Infectious Diseases Society of America) Older adults are at high risk for serious complications from flu and account for a majority of flu-related deaths and hospitalizations. H3N2 influenza viruses typically hit this age group particularly hard and have been associated with higher mortality than infections by H1N1 or influenza B viruses. During the 2012-2013 season, when H3N2 viruses were dominant, high-dose flu vaccine was 36 percent more effective at preventing deaths in the Medicare beneficiaries studied, compared to standard-dose vaccine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 2, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Flu vaccine seems to be working well, weakening punch of nasty bug
The current vaccine is a good match for this year's flu, and it includes a strain of Type A H3N2 flu virus that is causing most illnesses (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - February 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Flu Vaccine a Good Match for Viruses This Year
Overall, it has been 48 percent effective, but more severe H3N2 strain a factor in reduced coverage (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - February 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

CDC: Flu Activity Continues in US, Vaccine 50% Effective CDC: Flu Activity Continues in US, Vaccine 50% Effective
Influenza activity has been'moderate'thus far, and severity indicators are in the range seen in prior seasons dominated by influenza A (H3N2) viruses, health officials say.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Allergy Headlines)
Source: Medscape Allergy Headlines - February 16, 2017 Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Flu Vaccine a Pretty Good Match for Viruses This Year: CDC
Overall, it has been 48 percent effective, but more severe H3N2 strain a factor in reduced coverage Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Flu, Flu Shot (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - February 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

CDC: Flu Activity Continues in US, Vaccine 48% Effective CDC: Flu Activity Continues in US, Vaccine 48% Effective
Influenza activity has been'moderate'thus far, and severity indicators are in the range seen in prior seasons dominated by influenza A (H3N2) viruses, health officials say.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Allergy Headlines)
Source: Medscape Allergy Headlines - February 16, 2017 Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Can a flu shot wear off if you get it too early? Perhaps, scientists say
By Helen Branswell It can be jarring to see placards advertising "Flu Shots Today" in late July or early August in 80-degree weather. But those signs may be more than just an unwelcome reminder that summer's days are numbered. Mounting scientific evidence is raising questions about whether vaccinating people that early may actually be undermining the effectiveness of the nation's massive flu vaccination program. Studies from the US and Europe have detected a steady decline in vaccine protection in the months after vaccination. The most recent research, published just last month by scientists from the Centers f...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Flu Season Is Going To Be Worse This Year Than Last, The CDC Warns
For SELF, by Korin Miller.Here's what you need to do to protect yourself. Every year, you’re encouraged to get a flu shot before flu season rolls around, and you may or may not actually take that advice. This year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention wants you to know that, yes, you really should get that flu shot, even if you think it’s too late. According to the CDC, there has been a “slow but steady” increase in reported flu cases in November and December, with numbers expected to increase still. The CDC is also tracking people who visit their doctor with flu-like illnesses and found ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

First time flu infection may affect lifetime immunity
Conclusion This modelling study shows how the strains of influenza A – "bird flu" – circulating when a person is born give them lifelong protection against new subtypes with the same H protein groups. The researchers call this immune imprinting. This may help to explain the high severity and mortality rate seen among certain groups. For example, the massive flu pandemic of 1918 was an H1N1 strain. This had a very high fatality rate among young adults, which the researchers consider may have been because when they were born (between 1880 and 1900), H3 was the dominant strain. Therefore they had no prot...
Source: NHS News Feed - November 14, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Medical practice Source Type: news

CDC reports variant of swine flu not seen previously in people
A?Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention (CDC)?report released yesterday says 18 people in Michigan and Ohio fell ill after an outbreak of Influenza A(H3N2) Variant Virus that had not seen previously in people. Health officials linked the infections to swine exhibits at agricultural fairs. All 18 people have since recovered. Dr. Gregory Poland, director of [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - October 28, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

New analysis explores the geographical origins of the flu
A computer model shows that small increases in transmission rates of the seasonal influenza A virus (H3N2) can lead to rapid evolution of new strains that spread globally through human populations. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - September 14, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

FluGen begins Phase I trial of H3N2 RedeeFlu universal vaccine for influenza
US-based biopharmaceutical company FluGen has begun the first Phase I clinical trial of H3N2 RedeeFlu universal vaccine for influenza. (Source: Drug Development Technology)
Source: Drug Development Technology - July 28, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

There Is An Optimal Time Of Day To Get A Flu Shot, Study Suggests
There is an optimal time of the day to get a flu shot: the morning, according to a new study by researchers from the University of Birmingham and published in the journal Vaccine. In the study, senior citizens who got their flu vaccines in the mornings produced higher levels of antibodies to certain flu strains than those who got their shots in the afternoon. This is especially important for people over 65, who are more likely to have weaker immune systems than the general population and are more likely to be hospitalized and die from the flu. If the effect is confirmed in wider studies, giving seniors a shot in the m...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 27, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Canine Flu Has Dog Owners Wondering if Fido Needs a Vaccine
A vaccine is conditionally approved for H3N2, which showed up in 25 states. But veterinarians are not recommending the vaccine for every dog. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - December 12, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: JAN HOFFMAN Tags: Avian Influenza Veterinary Medicine Dogs Vaccination and Immunization Source Type: news

Dog Owners Wondering if Fido Needs a Flu Shot
A vaccine is conditionally approved for H3N2 canine flu, seen in 25 states. But veterinarians are not recommending the shot for every dog. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - December 12, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: JAN HOFFMAN Tags: Avian Influenza Veterinary Medicine Dogs Vaccination and Immunization Source Type: news

Merck Animal Health Pioneers H3N2 Canine Influenza Vaccine
Dateline City: MADISON, N.J. Innovative Addition Further Strengthens CIV Product Line Madison, N.J. - In response to the H3N2 canine influenza (CIV) outbreaks that impacted dogs in 241 states, Merck Animal Health (known as MSD Animal Health outside the United States and Canada) today announced the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has issued a conditional product license for a vaccine to protect against this newly identified strain of CIV. Canine Influenza Vaccine H3N2 will be available to U.S. veterinarians beginning Monday, November 23. Language: ...
Source: Merck.com - Corporate News - November 20, 2015 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Corporate News Animal Health Latest News Source Type: news

Flu Season: Vaccine Seems Good Match So Far
(MedPage Today) -- Vaccine has been updated to better match the H3N2 strain (Source: MedPage Today Public Health)
Source: MedPage Today Public Health - September 18, 2015 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Get the flu vaccine, reduce your risk of death
Last year was a lousy year for the flu vaccine. Hospitalizations for flu hit a nine-year high, and the vaccine prevented flu in only 23% of all recipients, compared with 50% to 60% of recipients in prior years. Why does the flu vaccine work well in some winters and not others? The flu vaccine primes the immune system to attack two proteins on the surface of the influenza A virus, hemagglutinin (H) and neuraminidase (N). Different flu strains have different combinations of these proteins — for example, the strains targeted by recent flu vaccines are H3N2 and H1N1. Unfortunately, the influenza virus is microbiology&rsq...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - September 15, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Ross, MD, FIDSA Tags: Cold and Flu Vaccines Flu Shot flu vaccine Source Type: news

Adjusted Flu Vaccine Options Available to Seniors This Year
Dear Savvy Senior, What can you tell me about this year's flu shot? Last year's vaccine was ineffective at preventing the flu, especially among seniors. What options are available to me this year? --Seeking Protection Dear Seeking, You're right. Last season's flu shot was not very effective at preventing the flu. In fact, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), people who got the shot were just 19 percent less likely to visit the doctor for flu than people who did not get the shot. In good years, flu shot effectiveness is in the 50 to 60 percent range. The reason for the shot's ineffectiveness l...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 7, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Virus Mutation Explains Poor Performance of Last Season's Flu Shot
Strain of H3N2 virus that was circulating did not match strain used in vaccine Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Flu, Immunization (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - June 25, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A single mutation helped last year's flu virus gain an advantage over the vaccine
(Cell Press) The 2014-2015 flu vaccine didn't work as well compared to previous years because the H3N2 virus recently acquired a mutation that concealed the infection from the immune system. A study published on June 25 in Cell Reports reveals the major viral mutation responsible for the mismatch between the vaccine strain and circulating strains. The research will help guide the selection of viral strains for future seasonal flu vaccines. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 25, 2015 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Four out of ten Brits may naturally show fewer flu symptoms
ConclusionA study of 1,414 unvaccinated people showed those with T cells targeting virus nucleoprotein still got infected by flu, but had fewer symptoms. The logic is that people with fewer symptoms are less likely to spread the virus through coughs and sneezes, which may slow the spread of both seasonal and pandemic flu strains.This is plausible, but was not directly tested in this study, so we don't know if it's true in real life. The research team suggested vaccines that boost T cell numbers might be worth exploring, as an alternative to those that try to stop virus infection altogether. An added potential benefit of th...
Source: NHS News Feed - June 16, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Medical practice Medication Swine flu Source Type: news

Next Season's Flu Shot Is Going To Be Very Different
By: Rachael Rettner Published: June 04, 2015 01:00pm ET on LiveScience. Next season's flu shot will contain two new flu strains that weren't present in last season's shot, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Health officials are making the change in the hope that next season's flu shot — which will be released in the autumn — will be a better match to the strains that are actually circulating, and will do a better job of preventing flu cases. Last season's flu shot was not very effective at preventing the flu: People who got the shot were just 19 percent less likely to visit the...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 6, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Don't worry, pet owners: Experts say H3N2 dog flu is no cause for panic
There's a new strain of canine flu in the U.S., and it has some pet owners worried about their furry family members. (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - May 30, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Dog Flu Is Spreading In The Midwest
Pet owners beware: dog flu exists and it’s spreading. At least 1,000 dogs in Illinois, Wisconsin, Ohio and Indiana were infected in the last month, according to research from the University of Wisconsin and Cornell University. Doctors at the two schools identified the virus as a strain of H3N2, a branch of the disease commonly found in Chinese and South Korean dog populations. The virus is not believed to spread to humans. “It’s believed that the H3N2 strain was introduced here from Asia, but how it happened is not known,” said Keith Poulsen, a University of Wisconsin veterinarian, in a press releas...
Source: TIME: Top Science and Health Stories - April 17, 2015 Category: Science Authors: Justin Worland Tags: Uncategorized animals influenza Source Type: news

Adults may only get 'real flu' every five years
Conclusion This complex scientific study looked at which factors might influence the immune response to flu over someone’s lifetime and also produced an estimate of how frequently people in different age groups are affected by flu. The details are of interest mainly to other scientists involved in studying the flu virus, how it may evolve and the best way to protect ourselves against it. When considering the results, it is important to note that these are estimates. They are based on blood samples from 150 people. This means there would have been a limited number of people in each age group, which spanned age seven t...
Source: NHS News Feed - March 4, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Medical practice Source Type: news

This year’s flu vaccine “disappointing” against main flu virus
Some years the flu vaccine works quite well. Other years it doesn’t. It has done a particularly poor job this year against the main flu virus. The CDC reported yesterday that this year’s flu vaccine has been just 18% effective. The estimate for children is even lower. And it looks like the nasal spray vaccine may not have worked at all among children. That poses a problem for the CDC, which recently recommended that doctors choose the nasal spray over the shot for younger kids. “Studies can’t confirm that the [nasal] vaccine has a benefit,” Dr. Joseph Bresee, chief of the Epidemiology and Prev...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - February 27, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Howard LeWine, M.D. Tags: Cold and Flu Vaccines Source Type: news

Flu jab is not a 'waste of time'
“Flu jab given to millions is 'useless',” and "Flu jab is a waste of time," are the irresponsible headlines in The Daily Telegraph and the Daily Mail. While recent research shows that the current seasonal flu vaccine only has 3% protection against the main circulating strain – A(H3N2) – in adults, it can still protect against other strains. Both papers also ignore the fact that another version of the flu vaccine, in the form of a nasal spray designed for vulnerable children, is also available. Discouraging parents of vulnerable children from getting vaccinated could increase the risk...
Source: NHS News Feed - February 6, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medical practice Heart/lungs QA articles Source Type: news

Flu vaccine failing to take the strain
This is because of a mismatch between the A(H3N2) strain selected for the vaccine this year and the main A(H3N2) strain that has been circulating in the UK this winter. More .... (Source: NHS Networks)
Source: NHS Networks - February 6, 2015 Category: UK Health Authors: Maria Axford Source Type: news

Flu and freezing weather may be driving up winter death rates
Conclusion There are always more deaths in winter than other seasons, particularly among elderly people. But why these fairly dramatic spikes in the death rate have occurred is still not understood. It should be noted these figures are provisional, as there can be a delay in the ONS receiving the data. Although the media has focused on the likely cause being flu, the numbers provided are for all respiratory conditions. Cold weather can exacerbate many of these conditions, such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. For most fit and healthy people, flu is not a serious threat, but the elderly and those ...
Source: NHS News Feed - February 4, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Lifestyle/exercise Medical practice QA articles Source Type: news

CDC Health Update Regarding Treatment of Patients with Influenza with Antiviral Medications
Widespread influenza activity is being reported in most U.S. states, with influenza A (H3N2) viruses the most common. CDC recommends the use of influenza antiviral drugs as an adjunct to vaccination to protect people from influenza. (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - January 16, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Seasonal Influenza Vaccine Only 23% Effective This Year Seasonal Influenza Vaccine Only 23% Effective This Year
An early analysis of the 2014 to 2015 influenza season indicates that the current vaccine is only 23% effective against H3N2 viruses, which are the predominant circulating strains. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - January 15, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Why this year's flu jab may not stop you falling sick
The jab is designed to prevent the most widespread flu virus, known as H3N2. However, the mutations of the virus appear resistant to it. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 13, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Flu season: The flu shot and what parents need to know now
The 2014-15 flu season is here, and it’s reached epidemic proportions. This season’s strain appears particularly nasty. About half of the United States is contending with high levels of flu activity, which means an onslaught of symptoms like fever, runny or stuff nose, cough and sore throat. Massachusetts has not been hit as hard as some other areas of the country. But the relative lull in flu activity might be the calm before the storm. The flu season will last for several more weeks, especially in areas that have not yet seen significant activity, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (C...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - January 6, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Lisa Fratt Source Type: news

U.S. Flu Numbers At Epidemic Threshold, Say CDC
Flu season is in full swing in the United States, and the proportion of deaths related to flu infections have reached epidemic threshold, according to a report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. According to data that came from a 122-city fatality reporting system, 6.8 percent of all deaths reported during the 51st week of the year (ending Dec. 20) were related to pneumonia and influenza. Four of those fatalities were pediatric patients, which makes a total of 15 pediatric deaths related to the flu so far for the 2014-2015 flu season beginning Oct. 1, noted the authors of the CDC report. The report als...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 31, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Influenza Hospitalizing Twice as Many as Last YearInfluenza Hospitalizing Twice as Many as Last Year
Influenza seasons dominated by an A(H3N2) virus, such as the current one, are tougher than most. A less effective vaccine makes it even worse. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - December 31, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

H3N2 viruses fuel 'epidemic' levels of flu season deaths, CDC says
Deaths due to influenza and pneumonia have hit “epidemic” levels in the U.S. as flu activity became widespread in 36 states, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - December 30, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Seasonal Flu: H3N2 Influenza
Seasonal influenza (the flu) is a serious illness that infects millions of Canadians every year. It is a common infectious respiratory disease that begins in the nose and throat. It is highly contagious and can spread rapidly from person to person. Flu cases result in approximately 12,200 hospitalizations and, on average, 3,500 deaths in Canada each year. (Source: Disabled World)
Source: Disabled World - December 29, 2014 Category: Disability Tags: Influenza Colds and Flu Source Type: news

MicrobeWatch: Influenza Update in Minnesota
Dec 22 - influenza A microbe watch graphic According to data from the Mayo Clinic Clinical Virology Laboratory, influenza activity has hit its peak in Rochester, Minnesota, and is widespread in Minnesota, Wisconsin, and 27 other states. The most common subtype is H3N2, which appears to be responding well to antivirals. Read more from Matt Binnicker, Ph.D., [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - December 23, 2014 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Influenza Activity on the Rise NationwideInfluenza Activity on the Rise Nationwide
From September 28 to December 6, overall US influenza activity increased, with the current vaccine offering little protection against more than half of influenza A (H3N2) viruses. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - December 18, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pulmonary Medicine News Source Type: news

CDC Warns About Drifted Influenza A (H3N2), Recommends Antiviral Medications
A recent CDC Health Alert Network advisory said drifted influenza A (H3N2) viruses have been detected this flu season and recommended use of appropriate antiviral medications when indicated. (Source: AAFP News)
Source: AAFP News - December 9, 2014 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

CDC Health Advisory Regarding the Potential for Circulation of Drifted Influenza A (H3N2) Viruses
Influenza viral characterization data indicates that 48% of the influenza A (H3N2) viruses collected and analyzed by CDC were antigenically "like" the 2014-2015 influenza A (H3N2) vaccine component, but that 52% were antigenically different (drifted) from the H3N2 vaccine virus. Because of the detection of these drifted influenza A (H3N2) viruses, the CDC has issued a Health Advisory to re-emphasize the importance of the use of neuraminidase inhibitor antiviral medications when indicated for treatment and prevention of influenza, as an adjunct to vaccination. (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - December 5, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

CDC warns this year’s flu season could be severe
The current 2014-2015 flu season is nothing to sneeze at and the ability of this year's vaccine to help could be reduced, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported this week. Seasonal influenza A H3N2 viruses have been most common so far this year, CDC said. "There often are more severe flu illnesses, hospitalizations, and deaths during seasons when these viruses predominate," it added. "For example, H3N2 viruses were predominant during the 2012-2013, 2007-2008, and 2003-2004 seasons,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - December 5, 2014 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

CDC: Dominance of H3N2 viruses may portend more deaths this flu season
The director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has a warning for Americans: Get ready for a potentially nasty flu season. (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - December 5, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

2014-15 Flu Vaccine Not a Perfect Match to Circulating Viruses (FREE)
By Kelly Young Edited by André Sofair, MD, MPH, and William E. Chavey, MD, MS Roughly half of the circulating influenza A (H3N2) viruses collected in the U.S. early this flu season are antigenically different from the H3N2 virus included in this year's vaccine, prompting CDC … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - December 5, 2014 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Flu Vaccine Doesn't Protect Against This Season's Most Dominant Strain
NEW YORK (AP) — The flu vaccine may not be very effective this winter, according to U.S. health officials who worry this may lead to more serious illnesses and deaths. Flu season has begun to ramp up, and officials say the vaccine does not protect well against the dominant strain seen most commonly so far this year. That strain tends to cause more deaths and hospitalizations, especially in the elderly. "Though we cannot predict what will happen the rest of this flu season, it's possible we may have a season that's more severe than most," said Dr. Tom Frieden, director of the Centers for Diseas...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 4, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Influenza Picking Up in U.S., Predominantly A(H3N2)
Influenza activity was low during October 2017, has been increasing since the start of November (Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge)
Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge - November 11, 2014 Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Family Medicine, Geriatrics, Gynecology, Infections, Internal Medicine, Critical Care, Emergency Medicine, Nursing, ENT, Pathology, Pediatrics, Pharmacy, Pulmonology, Journal, Source Type: news