Is a new flu pandemic just three mutations away?
Conclusion This laboratory study analysed an H7N9 strain of bird flu. Researchers wanted to explore whether a particular change to the surface proteins of a virus was capable of allowing the strain to bind to human tissue. This would theoretically lead to human-to-human transmission of the flu virus. It is worth noting that this ability to attach to human cells does not necessarily mean a mutated bird flu virus will be able to infect, replicate and transmit between humans. Other changes would also be required. However, they were unable to further investigate whether this surface change could lead to human-to-human transmis...
Source: NHS News Feed - June 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Medical practice Source Type: news

Pandemic Alert: How Lessons From China Can Help Us Rethink Urgent Health Threats
This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related... + articlesList=5919b373e4b0bd90f8e6a746,58e7ca87e4b06f8c18beeb55,58b9d3fde4b05cf0f4008d49 -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post)
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Identification of emerging threats may be aided by 1950s pandemic bird flu virus
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have evidence that descendants of the H2N2 avian influenza A virus that killed millions worldwide in the 1950s still pose a threat to human health, particularly to those under 50. The research has been published in an advance online edition of the Journal of Virology.The study included 22 H2N2 avian viruses collected from domestic poultry and wild aquatic birds between 1961 and 2008, making it the most comprehensive analysis yet of avian H2N2 viruses.Researchers reported the viruses could infect human respiratory cells. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 5, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Bird Flu / Avian Flu Source Type: news

1950s pandemic influenza virus remains a health threat, particularly to those under 50
(St. Jude Children's Research Hospital) St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have evidence that descendants of the H2N2 avian influenza A virus that killed millions worldwide in the 1950s still pose a threat to human health, particularly to those under 50. The research has been published in an advance online edition of the Journal of Virology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 3, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

1950s pandemic influenza virus remains a health threat, particularly to those under 50
St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital scientists report that avian H2N2 influenza A viruses related to 1957-1958 pandemic infect human cells and spread among ferrets; may aid identification of emerging threats. (Dr. Robert Webster) (Source: St. Jude Children's Research Hospital)
Source: St. Jude Children's Research Hospital - December 2, 2013 Category: Pediatrics Source Type: news