Death of 7-Year-Old Girl in DHS Custody ‘Preventable,’ Says Pediatrics Group President
The head of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has called the death of a 7-year-old Guatemalan girl in Department of Homeland Security custody “preventable” and called for pediatricians to have oversight of detention centers that hold migrant children. Dr. Colleen Kraft says the Dec. 8 death of Jackeline Caal is part of a broader failure to meet children’s basic needs that has characterized the Department of Homeland Security’s interaction with young people detained at the U.S.-Mexico border. “We will not stop asking questions until we learn more about the circumstances of this girl&rsqu...
Source: TIME: Health - December 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Michael Zennie Tags: Uncategorized Immigration onetime Source Type: news

3 Ways to End the Global HIV Epidemic —Locally
November 29, 2018It won ’t happen from an office or a conference room. It’ll happen on the front lines.If ever there was a day we wish didn ’t need commemorating, it’s World AIDS Day.We wish the virus had never made the jump from chimps to humans, morphing from simian immunodeficiency virus to HIV and altering the course of history in the process. We wish it hadn ’t orphaned countless children or infected them before they were even born. We wish it had never killed 39 million people and that there was no reason at all to mark December 1 this way, as we have for the past 30 years.Fortunately, w...
Source: IntraHealth International - November 29, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: mnathe Source Type: news

Guatemala City youth: an analysis of health indicators through the lens of a clinical registry - Golub SA, Maza Reyes JC, Stamoulis C, Leal Pensabene A, Tijerino Cord ón PA, Calgua E, Hassan A.
BACKGROUND: Despite the inclusion of adolescent health in recent global frameworks, limited data exist on health indicators in low-income countries. Our objective was to identify socioeconomic measures, risk behaviors and health indicators of young people ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

UK team shares drone expertise to help Guatemalans better prepare for volcanic eruptions
A team of scientists and engineers from the Universities of Bristol and Birmingham have returned from Guatemala where they have been teaching local scientists how to use drones to map the Fuego volcano which violently erupted earlier this year. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - November 8, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: International; Faculty of Science, Faculty of Science, School of Earth Sciences, Faculty of Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, School of Civil, Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, School of Civil, Aerospace and Mechanical Engin Source Type: news

FROM THE FIELD: Enslaved Guatemalan indigenous women wait for reparations
Fifteen Guatemalan women from the Q ’eqchi indigenous group, who were enslaved and raped by the military during the Central American country’s 36-year-long civil conflict, are still waiting for hard-won reparations to materialize. (Source: UN News Centre - Women, Children, Population)
Source: UN News Centre - Women, Children, Population - October 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

It's an INVASION, but with babies instead of guns... Migrant caravan demands U.S. surrender entire nation to impoverished Central Americans
(Natural News) On Sunday, POTUS Donald Trump took to Twitter to express his outrage and frustration regarding the rapidly expanding migrant caravan that Honduran, Guatemalan, and Mexican authorities have thus far allowed safe passage as they steadily approach the United States. “Full efforts are being made to stop the onslaught of illegal aliens from crossing... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Zero Hunger: our actions today are our future tomorrow
This article is part of a series of opinion pieces to mark World Food Day October 16   José Graziano da Silva is Director-General of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United NationsThe post Zero Hunger: our actions today are our future tomorrow appeared first on Inter Press Service. (Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health)
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - October 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Jose Graziano da Silva Tags: Development & Aid Economy & Trade Editors' Choice Featured Food & Agriculture Global Headlines Health Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations World Food Day 2018 Source Type: news

Hurricane Michael Strengthens Into Category 2 As it Barrels Towards Florida
MIAMI — Hurricane Michael swiftly intensified into a Category 2 over warm Gulf of Mexico waters Tuesday amid fears it would strike Florida on Wednesday as a major hurricane. Mandatory evacuations were issued as beach dwellers rushed to board up homes just ahead of what could be a devastating hit. A hurricane hunter plane that bounced into the swirling eye off the western tip of Cuba found wind speeds rising. By 8 a.m. Tuesday, top winds had reached 100 mph (155 kph), and it was forecast to strengthen more, with winds topping 111 mph (179 kph), capable of causing devastating damage. Gov. Rick Scott warned people acro...
Source: TIME: Science - October 9, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized onetime weather Source Type: news

Making Every Euro Count in the Fight Against Malnutrition
Graziano da Silva with a group of women who are participating in a vegetable-growing project in Borno State, north-eastern Nigeria. Credit: FAO/Carlos LaordenBy José Graziano da SilvaROME, Oct 3 2018 (IPS)Everybody wants to end hunger. That is what all UN-member countries stated when signing the 2030 Agenda for a better world: the second of its 17 goals aims at eradicating all forms of malnutrition (which include overweight, obesity or micronutrient deficiencies) and ensuring that everybody has access to nutritious and healthy foods. Along with these good intentions, we have in recent decades seen real efforts and c...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - October 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Jose Graziano da Silva Tags: Development & Aid Economy & Trade Featured Food & Agriculture Global Global Governance Headlines Health Population Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) Source Type: news

People Around the World Experienced Record Levels of Stress and Pain in 2017, Study Says
Last year was the worst in at least a decade for people across the globe, according to Gallup’s annual Global Emotions report. Gallup’s Negative Experience Index — a measure of how many people experienced worry, stress, sadness, anger or pain on the day before the survey — reached its highest point since 2006, according the report. Almost 40% of adults from 146 countries said they’d experienced worry or stress the day before the survey, while 31% said they’d felt physical pain, 23% said they’d been sad and 20% said they’d felt anger. Those results tallied up to a Negative Exp...
Source: TIME: Health - September 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized onetime Research Source Type: news

Patients' WTP low for arbovirus vaccines in Guatemala
(Source: PharmacoEconomics and Outcomes News)
Source: PharmacoEconomics and Outcomes News - September 1, 2018 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

Six countries in the Americas account for half of all firearm deaths
(Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation) A new study reveals more than a quarter-million people died from firearm-related injuries in 2016, with half of those deaths occurring in only six countries in the Americas: Brazil, the United States, Mexico, Colombia, Venezuela, and Guatemala. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 28, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

One Major Reason the AIDS Epidemic Isn ’t Going Away
It's a serious threat to progress in HIV treatment and prevention —and something we have the knowledge to stop, especially in health care settings.August 08, 2018It's a serious threat to public health and progress in HIV treatment and prevention —and something we have the knowledge to stop.A few years ago Dany Stolbunov, now 20, told his doctor in Ukraine that he wanted to go to medical school. He was sharing his ambitions with someone he admired and trusted, who he thought might believe in him, the person responsible for his care.“I told him I wanted to become a physician, too.”“You can&rsquo...
Source: IntraHealth International - August 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: lfreeze Source Type: news

New Project Will Bring High-Quality HIV Services to the People Who Need Them Most in Five Central American Countries
August 07, 2018​IntraHealth International will expand its HIV prevention, care, and treatment efforts in Central America with a new $15 million award from the U.S. Agency for International Development. The Strengthening Care and Treatment Cascade Project will help El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Panama improve the quality and reach of their HIV services and allocate more resources where they are most needed.While the overall HIV prevalence is low in these countries, the epidemic is concentrated among key groups, including men who have sex with men, transgender women, and female sex workers. Despite these...
Source: IntraHealth International - August 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: intrahealth Source Type: news

UPitt to Take Name of Doctor Involved in Tuskegee Off of Hall UPitt to Take Name of Doctor Involved in Tuskegee Off of Hall
The role of Thomas Parran Jr, MD, in overseeing the Tuskegee and Guatemalan STD experiments could not be ignored, said a Pitt panel. A daughter of one of the Tuskegee victims commends the move.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - July 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

After ‘Volcano of Fire’ eruption, women and girls face heightened risks
ESCUINTLA, Guatemala –Marta Leiva, 7 months pregnant, leaned against two bags of donated clothes in her shelter in Guatemala ’s Escuintla Department. She lost everything when her house was destroyed during the eruption of the Volcan de Fuego, or " Volcano of Fire, " last month.She fled with her two young daughters, husband and sister as hot ash and debris flowed into their village, El Rodeo. Her mother-in-law and brother-in-law did not make it.Today, the family ’s only possessions are a mattress and the two bags of clothes.  (Source: UNFPA News)
Source: UNFPA News - July 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: zerzan Source Type: news

These Before and After Satellite Images Show the Scale of the Destruction From the Guatemala Volcano
Before and after satellite images show the horrifying scale of the destruction left in the wake of the Guatemala volcano eruption. The pictures, from satellite imagery company Digital Globe, show the world-famous La Reunion Golf Resort on April 7, 2017 and on Wednesday – days after the eruption of Volcan de Fuego, Spanish for “volcano of fire.” The once lush, green resort appears completely blanketed by lava and grey ash. The golf course, which is four miles from the volcano, was the host of the Latinoamerica PGA tour since 2014 and kicked off the 2018 Guatemala Stella Artois Open in March. The resort was...
Source: TIME: Science - June 7, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Gina Martinez Tags: Uncategorized Guatemala onetime Volcano Source Type: news

At Guatemala Volcano, Weather and Danger Halt Search
SAN MIGUEL LOS LOTES, Guatemala (AP) — Guatemala's national disaster agency on Thursday suspended search and rescue efforts at the zone devastated by the eruption of the Volcano of Fire, saying climatic conditions and still-hot volcanic material makes it dangerous for the rescuers. It said it decided to suspend the search now that 72 hours have passed. That's the length of time officials had said earlier that some victims might have survived. Troublesome rain and more volcanic activity had been hindering search searches, but when teams have been able to work in the hardest hit areas, the death toll has continued to ...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - June 7, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mark Stevenson and Sonia Perez D., Associated Press Tags: Major Incidents News Source Type: news

8 of the World ’s Most Dangerous Volcanoes, According to Experts
Dozens of people have died, hundreds are missing and many more homes were destroyed after separate volcanic eruptions in Hawaii and Guatemala that made headlines worldwide in recent months. And although those volcano eruptions are not part of a trend, experts have said, the volcanoes in question are far from the only dangerous ones in the world. When assessing which volcanoes are the most dangerous in the world, however, several factors come into play, including population density surrounding active volcanoes, the types of magma that emerge during eruptions and each volcano’s eruption history. For example, an explosi...
Source: TIME: Science - June 6, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Mahita Gajanan Tags: Uncategorized onetime Volcanoes Source Type: news

Only a few of Guatemala Volcano's Dead Have Been Identified
EL RODEO, Guatemala (AP) — People of the villages skirting Guatemala's Volcano of Fire have begun mourning the few dead who could be identified after an eruption killed dozens by engulfing them in floods of searing ash and mud. Mourners cried over caskets lined up in a row in the main park of San Juan Alotenango on Monday evening before rescuers stopped their work for another night. There was no electricity in the hardest hit areas of Los Lotes and El Rodeo, so most searching continued only until sunset. As dawn broke Tuesday, the volcano continued to rattle, with what the country's volcanology institute said were ei...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - June 5, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Sonia Perez D., Associated Press Tags: Major Incidents News Source Type: news

Morning Break: Guatemalan Volcano; Obesity Balloon Deaths; Defensive Disgust
(MedPage Today) -- Health news and commentary from around the Web gathered by the MedPage Today staff (Source: MedPage Today Psychiatry)
Source: MedPage Today Psychiatry - June 5, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: news

Guatemala Volcano Death Toll Up to 33, Expected to Rise
EL RODEO, Guatemala (AP) — Rescuers on Monday pulled at least 10 people alive from ash drifts and mud flows that poured down the slopes of Guatemala's erupting Volcano of Fire, but officials said at least 33 people were dead and the toll was expected to rise. The head of the country's disaster agency, Sergio Cabanas, gave the updated death toll, but said rescuers using helicopters had pulled 10 people from areas swept over by a towering cloud of thick ash, mud or lava. Residents of El Rodeo, about 8 miles (12 kilometers) downslope from the crater, said they were caught unaware by fast-moving pyroclastic flows when th...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - June 4, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Sonia Perez D., Associated Press Tags: Major Incidents News Source Type: news

Watch the moment a woman with headaches and dizziness has a COCKROACH removed from her ear
A woman in Guatemala City visited her local volunteer fire station when she was suffering headaches and, on closer inspection, medics found a dead cockroach lodged in her ear canal. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Navigating with coyotes: pathways of Central American migrants in Mexico's southern borders - Gonz ález YG.
This article presents research from an ethnographic investigation of the role of the men and women who facilitate clandestine border crossings (known colloquially as coyotes) in the Mexico-Guatemala northern borderlands. A significant portion of the fieldw... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Jurisprudence, Laws, Legislation, Policies, Rules Source Type: news

Good Intentions, Bad Habits: Reforming Mental Healthcare In LatAm
The Latin America and Caribbean (LAC) region is a vast patchwork of countries, cultures and ethnicities with a total population of more than 645 million, ranging from 209 million-plus in Brazil to islands with fewer than 100,000 inhabitants.The diversity is also economic; recent years have seen marked improvements in income distribution and a burgeoning middle class, particularly in countries such as Argentina, Bolivia, Ecuador, Peru and Nicaragua. Yet, LAC remains the region with the highest levels of income inequality worldwide.All of this has a significant bearing on the state of mental health, where good intentions and...
Source: EyeForPharma - April 9, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Marc Yates Source Type: news

Community Liaisons are Resourceful and Persistent
April 06, 2018This week, we ’re featuring stories from frontline health workers all over the world. It’s just one of the ways we’re celebrating World Health Worker Week 2018. Imagine having to travel for hours to a faraway health facility to get regular, critical care —even though there’s a similar facility just down the road from your home.This is what Luis*, 49, struggles with in Western Guatemala. He wants to get the HIV care he needs, earn a living, and maintain his privacy all at the same time —but it’s difficult.“In [the closest] HIV clinic, there is a cleanin...
Source: IntraHealth International - April 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: intrahealth Source Type: news

In Central America, New Adherence Promoters Keep HIV Clients on Treatment
March 02, 2018Carlos considered dropping out of everything. Then he met Aracely, an adherence promoter.Carlos* remembers the exact date he found out he was HIV-positive. He was 20 years old.“January 20, 2015. I was walking with some friends and, over in the square, we saw a tent where they were giving HIV tests,” he says. “As a group of nursing assistants, we said, ‘Let’s do this! Why not?’”Carlos sat alone as he waited for his results. He was #45 in the queue that day.“When they told me I needed additional tests because my results were reactive to virus, I felt my world fall...
Source: IntraHealth International - March 2, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: cbales Source Type: news

Unaccompanied children migrating from Central America: public health implications for violence prevention and intervention - Estefan LF, Ports KA, Hipp T.
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Unaccompanied children (UC) migrating to the USA from the Central American countries of El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras are an underserved population at high risk for health, academic, and social problems. These children experience ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 26, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

A Step Towards the Light: Ending Human Trafficking
Children from rural areas and disempowered homes are ideal targets for trafficking in India and elsewhere. Credit: Neeta Lal / IPSBy Tharanga YakupitiyageUNITED NATIONS, Feb 21 2018 (IPS)A new initiative aims to use data to shed light on a pervasive multi-billion dollar criminal industry: human trafficking.Created by the International Organization for Migration and Polaris, the Counter-Trafficking Data Collaborative (CTDC) is the world’s first human trafficking data portal. It collects data from various counter-trafficking organizations around the world in order to help stakeholders identify and respond to trends.&ld...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - February 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tharanga Yakupitiyage Tags: Aid Crime & Justice Education Featured Gender Violence Global Headlines Health Human Rights Migration & Refugees TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

In Central America, Health Workers and Communities Achieve Big Progress in the Fight against HIV
Health workers in the HIV clinic at Juan Jos é Ortega National Hospital in Coatepeque, Guatemala. Photos by Anna Watts for IntraHealth InternationalFebruary 07, 2018IntraHealth International is in the final months of an intensive two-and-a-half-year collaboration with government agencies, nongovernmental organizations, and civil society groups in El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Panama to accelerate progress toward reaching theUNAIDS Fast-Track targets and ending the AIDS epidemic —and the results from the first two years are striking. IntraHealth’s local partners administered 186,471 HIV tests, rea...
Source: IntraHealth International - February 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: intrahealth Source Type: news

Lost Mayan City Discovered Under Guatemala Jungle
(GUATEMALA CITY) — Researchers using a high-tech aerial mapping technique have found tens of thousands of previously undetected Mayan houses, buildings, defense works and pyramids in the dense jungle of Guatemala’s Peten region, suggesting that millions more people lived there than previously thought. The discoveries, which included industrial-sized agricultural fields and irrigation canals, were announced Thursday by an alliance of U.S., European and Guatemalan archaeologists working with Guatemala’s Mayan Heritage and Nature Foundation. The study estimates that roughly 10 million people may have lived w...
Source: TIME: Science - February 3, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized APW onetime World Source Type: news

Scientists discover ancient Mayan city hidden under Guatemalan jungle
Aerial laser mapping detects thousands of hidden structures in Peten region, suggesting its population was millions more than previously thought Researchers using a high-tech aerial mapping technique have found tens of thousands of previously undetected Mayan houses, buildings, defence works and pyramids in the dense jungle of Guatemala ’s Peten region, suggesting that millions more people lived there than previously thought.The discoveries, which included industrial-sized agricultural fields and irrigation canals, were announced on Thursday by an alliance of US, European and Guatemalan archaeologists working with Gu...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 3, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Tags: Archaeology Science Guatemala Americas World news Source Type: news

'Game Changer': Maya Cities Unearthed In Guatemala Forest Using Lasers
The technology provides them with an unprecedented view into how the ancient civilization worked and lived, revealing almost industrial agricultural infrastructure and new insights into warfare. (Image credit: PACUNAM/Marcello Canuto & Luke Auld-Thomas) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Merrit Kennedy Source Type: news

10 Global Health Issues to Watch in 2018
January 19, 2018It ’s notallbad news.When we set out to compile our annual list of global health issues to watch this year, it seemed like all bad news. And true, that ’s often what we deal with in global health—the problems that need tackling, the suffering we can help alleviate.But then stories and columns likethis one cheer us up. They remind us that no matter how complicated and frustrating our work may get, fighting back against poverty and inequality works.There are and always will be global health challenges to face. But there ’s boundless hope, too. And a field full of determined health work...
Source: IntraHealth International - January 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: mnathe Source Type: news

Viewing gendered violence in Guatemala through photovoice - Duffy L.
This research examined rural and urban women's experiences of gender-based violence in Chimaltenango, Guatemala. Photovoice methodology was used to describe and analyze local realities and vulnerabilities, and ethnographic techniques added cultural and con... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Research Methods, Surveillance and Codes, Models Source Type: news

Scientists identify what may have killed millions in mystery epidemic
In the 16th century, an epidemic known as "cocoliztli" that caused bleeding and vomiting swept through large areas of Guatemala, Mexico and even reached Peru. It wiped out 80% of the population, killing millions of people. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - January 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

500 years later, scientists discover what probably killed the Aztecs
Within five years, 15 million people – 80% of the population – were wiped out in an epidemic named ‘cocoliztli’, meaning pestilenceIn 1545 disaster struck Mexico ’s Aztec nation when people started coming down with high fevers, headaches and bleeding from the eyes, mouth and nose. Death generally followed in three or four days.Within five years as many as 15 million people – an estimated 80% of the population – were wiped out in an epidemic the locals named “cocoliztli”. The word means pestilence in the Aztec Nahuatl language. Its cause, however, has been questioned for...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 16, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Agence France-Presse Tags: Mexico Health Science Americas Guatemala Source Type: news

Microfinance and violence against women in rural Guatemala - Cepeda I, Lacalle-Calderon M, Torralba M.
Violence against Women (VaW) has come to be recognized as a serious human rights abuse with important consequences not only for women but for whole societies. Since VaW has several manifestations, it is possible to differentiate among different types of vi... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Rural and Agricultural Issues Source Type: news

Good to Know (Perhaps) That Food Is Being ‘Nuclearised’
Using nuclear sciences to feed the world. Credit: FAOBy Baher KamalROME, Nov 16 2017 (IPS)It might sound strange, very strange, but the news is that scientists and experts have been assuring, over and again, that using nuclear applications in agriculture –and thus in food production—are giving a major boost to food security. So how does this work? To start with, nuclear applications in agriculture rely on the use of isotopes and radiation techniques to combat pests and diseases, increase crop production, protect land and water resources, and ensure food safety and authenticity, as well as increase livestock pro...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Baher Kamal Tags: Editors' Choice Environment Featured Food & Agriculture Global Headlines Health Natural Resources Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Lunching ranger discovers species lost for 40 years
In 1975 two conservationists discovered a gorgeous salamander in the rainforests of Guatemala. No one ever saw it again – and Jackson’s climbing salamander was feared extinct – until last month when local forest guard, Ramos León-Tomás, sat down in the forest for lunch. The last time anyone saw Jackson ’s climbing salamander – I didn’t yet exist. It was 1975: Margaret Thatcher took over leadership of the Tories, Saigon fell to Communist forces, the USSR was still a thing, and everyone was listening to Queen’s Bohemian Rhapsody. And in Guatemala, reeling from over a de...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Jeremy Hance Tags: Environment Conservation Wildlife Guatemala Americas World news Animals Source Type: news

Qualitative Exploration of Effectiveness, Feasibility and Self-Efficacy for Methods to Prevent Zika Virus Disease in Guatemala, Central America: Preliminary Results Report
U.S. Agency for International Development. 09/22/2017 This 46-page report, published by the USAID-funded Health Communication Capacity Collaborative (HC3), details the initial findings of a qualitative exploration of the perception of the effectiveness, feasibility, and self-efficacy of Zika prevention actions among pregnant women, men with a pregnant partner, and women likely to become pregnant in Guatemala. The research also explored the perceptions of the seriousness of Zika and how it changed over the course of the outbreak. (PDF) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - October 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Zika Prevention Knowledge and Behaviors in Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras: SMS (Short Message Service) Monitoring Survey: Wave One Report
U.S. Agency for International Development. 05/2017 This 50-page report, published by the USAID-funded Health Communication Capacity Collaborative (HC3), provides information about a quantitative short message service (SMS) survey in the four focus countries of the USAID Zika Response (El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Dominican Republic) to derive estimates for specific Zika-related knowledge and prevention behavior. The work was initially conceived and developed as a monitoring activity to feed specific USAID-prioritized indicators on knowledge and prevention of Zika. (PDF) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Di...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - October 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Q'eqchi' Mayas and the myth of "postconflict" Guatemala - Knowlton A.
While Guatemala has commonly been referred to as a "postconflict" setting since the end of the armed conflict of 1960-1996, Guatemalans today experience a new violence that has been described as a symptom of the changes brought about by neoliberal reforms.... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

The True Story Behind the Movie American Made
American Made, the new Tom Cruise crime drama out Sept. 29, has all the makings of a romp: drug running and arms smuggling. An FBI sting. Enough cold, hard cash to make the phenomenon of raining money a plausible ecological scenario. And a sex scene in the cockpit of a plane. That’s flying through the air. With one participant being the pilot. Did we mention it’s Tom Cruise? If it sounds like an exercise in screenwriting excess, it’s not entirely — the film takes as its inspiration the true story of Adler Berriman “Barry” Seal, a TWA pilot who became a drug smuggler for the Medellí...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Eliza Berman Tags: Uncategorized movies tom cruise Source Type: news

20 Hotels You Didn ’t Know Were Owned by Celebrities
This article originally appeared on TravelandLeisure.com (Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories)
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Adeline Duff/ Travel + Leisure Tags: Uncategorized celebrities onetime onetimetravel Source Type: news

What Is Hispanic Heritage Month?
Hispanic Heritage Month is an official celebration of American citizens whose ancestry can be traced back to Spain, Mexico, Central and South America and the Caribbean. When is Hispanic Heritage Month? The festival now lasts from September 15 to October 15 every year, but it first started out as just a week long celebration of in 1968. Twenty years later, in 1988 it expanded to dedicate a whole four weeks for the celebration of being Hispanic. The celebration starts in the middle of the month, as opposed to the end, because the 15th marks the independence days of five Latin America countries: Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guate...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rachel Lewis Tags: Uncategorized hispanic heritage month onetime Smithsonian Source Type: news

Massive Earthquake in Mexico, Many Dead, Injured
MEXICO CITY (AP) — One of the most powerful earthquakes ever to strike Mexico has hit off its southern Pacific coast, killing at least 15 people, toppling houses and businesses and sending panicked people into the streets more than 650 miles (1,000 kilometers) away. The U.S. Geological Survey said the earthquake hit off Chiapas state near the Guatemalan border with a magnitude of 8.1 — slightly stronger than the magnitude 8 quake of 1985 that killed thousands and devastated large parts of Mexico City. National civil defense chief Luis Felipe Puente told the Televisa network that at least 15 people had died, 10 ...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - September 8, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Christopher Sherman and E. Eduardo Castillo, Associated Press Tags: Major Incidents News Source Type: news