Looking to the Future of Neuro Devices: Exclusive Interview with Alcyone Lifesciences CEO PJ Anand
Alcyone Lifesciences is a medical technology company based out of Lowell, MA, which specializes in central nervous system (CNS) drug delivery platforms for targeted infusions of the brain or spinal cord. Their Thecaflex DRx System was recently awarded Breakthrough Device designation by the FDA, for spinal infusion of therapeutic medications. Medgadget had the opportunity to speak with Alcyone Lifesciences CEO, PJ Anand, about his inspiration for cutting edge medical technology and the future direction of neurological devices.   Kurt Yaeger, Medgadget: Great to talk to you, PJ. Please first give us a sense of your back...
Source: Medgadget - May 7, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Kurt Yaeger Tags: Exclusive Neurology Neurosurgery Pain Management Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

cIMPACT-NOW Update 4: diffuse gliomas characterized by MYB, MYBL1, or FGFR1 alterations or BRAFV600E mutation
This cIMPACT-NOW update was published this month:Summary:cIMPACT (Consortium to Inform Molecular and Practical Approaches to CNS Tumor Taxonomy) has reviewed the status of WHO grade II IDH-wt/H3-wt diffuse gliomas, focusing on those with a BRAFV600E mutation, FGFR1 alteration, or a MYB or MYBL1 rearrangement, and recommends the use of an integrated diagnosis to combine their histologic and genetic features. The consortium ecommends the use of an integrated diagnosis to combine their histologic and genetic features, as suggested in the following:Diffuse glioma, MYB...
Source: neuropathology blog - April 16, 2019 Category: Radiology Tags: molecular studies neoplasms Source Type: blogs

Cancer-killing viruses
by Gertrud Rey Although cancer therapies have improved dramatically in recent years, the main options for treating cancer still consist of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy. This limitation is a problem for aggressive cancers like glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), brain cancers which are typically resistant to traditional therapies. GBM is a high grade glioma, an aggressive […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - February 28, 2019 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Basic virology Gertrud Rey Information glioblastoma multiforme herpes simplex virus viral viral oncotherapy viruses Source Type: blogs

Antibody positive autoimmune encephalitis presenting with faciobrachial dystonic seizures-Case Report
63 year old male presented with new onset faciobrachial dystonic seizures. Imaging showed T2 Flair hyperintensity in left hippocampus. Possibility of autoimmune encephalitis was considered and we went for CSF autoantibody study.Result came as positive for LGI 1  (Leucine rich Glioma Inactivated-1)  antibody in CSF.We also did a paraneoplastic work up to rule out any underlying malignancy. But was unyielding. Patient was treated with steroid pulse with methylprednisolone for 5 days. Subsequently, he was continued on oral steroids. Patient improved. No further seizure episodes.  Patient is being kept on follow...
Source: Sumer's Radiology Site - December 9, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Sumer Sethi Source Type: blogs

A WHO grade IV diagnosis in the face of a low-grade histophenotype: a difficult situation for the surgical neuropathologist
This midbrain mass in a 33-year-old patient has low-grade histology (minimal mitoses, low MIB-1 cell cycling index, and a single Rosenthal fiber), yet it harbors the H3 K27M mutation. Perivascular lymphocytes were present, but ganglioglioma was ruled out. So, the following diagnosis was rendered:diffuse midline glioma, H3 K27M mutant, WHO grade IV. Other molecular changes included loss of p16 (CDKN2a) and loss of PTEN and 10 centromere, consistent with monosomy for chromosome 10. The discordance between histopathology and molecular findings can make the diagnostician squeamish about rendering a high-grade diagnos...
Source: neuropathology blog - September 20, 2018 Category: Radiology Tags: neoplasms Source Type: blogs

Circadian Rhythm Gene May Serve as Target for Glioblastoma Therapies
Scientists from the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute say a gene involved in the body's circadian rhythms is a potential target for therapies for glioblastoma.Their discovery ( “Casein Kinase 1 Epsilon Regulates Glioblastoma Cell Survival”), published in Scientific Reports, points to a subtype of a particular gene that apparently is enabling the survival of cancer cells, although it is more commonly associated with circadian rhythms.“In our previous work, we identified casein kinase 1 ε (CK1ε, also known as CSNK1E) as a potential survival factor in glioblastoma. However, ...
Source: neuropathology blog - September 11, 2018 Category: Radiology Tags: neoplasms Source Type: blogs

Focused Ultrasound and Intranasal Drug Delivery for Brain Cancer Therapy
Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis have developed a new method to bypass the blood-brain barrier and deliver drugs to the brain, which could be particularly useful in difficult-to-treat brain tumors. The technique involves administering drugs through an intranasal spray, meaning that the drug can travel directly into the brain along the trigeminal and olfactory nerves. Then, the researchers can use focused ultrasound to allow the drug to penetrate and accumulate in deeper layers of the tissue, and exert therapeutic benefit at the ultrasound-targeted region. Drug therapy for brain tumors is challenging, ...
Source: Medgadget - September 10, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: ENT Neurology Neurosurgery Oncology Source Type: blogs

Genotype-Specific Microparticle Treatment for Brain Cancer
Researchers from Harvard and MIT have developed microparticles that can treat a specific genetic subtype of glioma, a brain cancer. The microparticles slowly release a drug that specifically targets cancer cells that rely on a particular enzyme. During surgery to remove the brain tumor, clinicians can conduct a rapid (30 min) genetic test on a biopsy sample to see if the tumor is suitable for treatment. If so, they can place the microparticles into the resection site to kill cancer cells at the resection boundary and help to prevent tumor recurrence. Removing an entire brain tumor can be tricky, especially if it is located...
Source: Medgadget - August 9, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Materials Neurology Neurosurgery Oncology Source Type: blogs

Diffuse brainstem gliomas: MRI
Case Report: This is a pediatric case of diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas with enlargement of the pons, with the basilar artery displaced anteriorly against the clivus . The floor of the fourth ventricle is flattened, this is called as flat floor of fourth ventricle sign and obstructive hydrocephalus may be present. There is only minimal post gadolinium enhancement in post contrast scans. Diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas harbour K27M mutations in the histone H3 gene H3F3A, or less commonly in the related HIST1H3B genes.Famous Radiology Blog http://www.sumerdoc.blogspot.com TeleRad Providers at www.teleradprovi...
Source: Sumer's Radiology Site - July 30, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Sumer Sethi Source Type: blogs

Best Post of May 2018: Moving beyond histologic grading of IDH-wildtype diffuse astrocytic gliomas
The next in our " Best of the Month " series comes fromMay, 30, 2018:Despite the fact that the most recent update of the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of central nervous system tumors was published only two years ago, the data is already showing that we are moving beyond that classification system when if comes to IDH-wildtype diffuse astrocytomas. The concept of an " integrated diagnosis " in the setting of IDH-wildtype histologic grade II and III tumors has already been eclipsed in the literature by the primacy of the genetic signature over histologic appearance in predicting outcome....
Source: neuropathology blog - July 12, 2018 Category: Radiology Tags: Best of the Month series molecular studies neoplasms Source Type: blogs

Moving beyond histologic grading of IDH-wildtype diffuse astrocytic gliomas
Despite the fact that the most recent update of the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of central nervous system tumors was published only two years ago, the data is already showing that we are moving beyond that classification system when if comes to IDH-wildtype diffuse astrocytomas. The concept of an " integrated diagnosis " in the setting of IDH-wildtype histologic grade II and III tumors has already been eclipsed in the literature by the primacy of the genetic signature over histologic appearance in predicting outcome. In the near future, diffuse IDH-wildtype astrocytic gliomas with (1) combined ...
Source: neuropathology blog - May 30, 2018 Category: Radiology Tags: neoplasms Source Type: blogs

Dr. Dan Brat interviewed on Northwestern Feinberg School of Medicine Podcast
In the latest episode of theNorthwestern Medicine Breakthroughs podcast,Daniel Brat, MD, PhD discusses the emerging integrated molecular-histomorphological classification of diffuse gliomas. In an episode entitled " A New Way to Diagnose Brain Tumors " , Dr. Brat -- the new chairman of theNorthwestern Pathology -- states that "whenever you go through a reclassification that dramatic, there's going to be gaps in knowledge and gaps in practice and we are recognizing those gaps on aDr. Dan Bratdaily basis, on a yearly basis.  And we as a brain tumor community internationally are working to fill those gaps ...
Source: neuropathology blog - May 25, 2018 Category: Radiology Tags: neuropathologists Source Type: blogs

Best Post of April 2018: Exuberant endothelial reactive hyperplasia next to a subacute infarct biopsied to rule out neoplasia
The next is on " Best of the Month " series is from Tuesday, April 3, 2018:Endothelial hyperplasia next to an infarct, not to be confused with microvascular proliferation in a glioma (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - May 25, 2018 Category: Radiology Tags: Best of the Month series vascular disease Source Type: blogs

Chordoid Glioma, WHO grade II in a 63-year-old male presenting with disequilibrium and hypothermia
(Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - April 18, 2018 Category: Radiology Tags: neoplasms Source Type: blogs

Exuberant endothelial reactive hyperplasia next to a subacute infarct biopsied to rule out neoplasia
Endothelial hyperplasia next to an infarct, not to be confused with microvascular proliferation in a glioma (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - April 3, 2018 Category: Radiology Tags: vascular disease Source Type: blogs

What Does Your Handedness Say About Your Brain Structure?
Left-handedness, as a relatively uncommon phenomenon, never fails to fascinate people. There is a common perception that left-handed people are more talented and artistic. To what extent these assumptions are correct, and what your preferred use of right or left hand can tell you about your brain structure? Handedness represents the better performance or preference of using one hand, i.e., the dominant hand. Right-handedness is the most common type observed in 70–95% of the world population, followed by left-handedness, and then a very rare type of mixed handedness and ambidexterity. Although this is an important ph...
Source: World of Psychology - March 13, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Staff Tags: Brain and Behavior Brain Blogger Publishers Brain Structure Handedness left-handed right-handed Source Type: blogs

Course being offered at March 2018 USCAP annual meeting: Non-neoplastic surgical neuropathology that can be mistaken for neoplasia
SC07 - Surgical Neuropathology - The Other StuffThursday, March 22, 2018 - 8:00 am - 11:30 amThis Short Course session includes up to a half-hour break.Session Credits:3 CME and 3 SAMsFacultyBette K. Kleinschmidt-DeMasters, MD, University of Colorado, Aurora, CORichard A. Prayson, MD, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OHAnthony T. Yachnis, MD, University of Florida, Gainesville, FLCourse DescriptionThe majority of cases encountered in surgical neuropathology represent neoplasms. Subsequently, most pathologist, when confronted with a surgical neuropathology case, are usually “thinking tumor” and conjuring up differen...
Source: neuropathology blog - February 28, 2018 Category: Radiology Tags: meetings Source Type: blogs

Glioma and VTE
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - October 10, 2017 Category: Internal Medicine Tags: cardiovascular hematology oncology Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, August 28th 2017
In conclusion, CAVD is highly prevalent. Long understood as a passive process, it is now known to be complex and one which involves pathophysiological mechanisms similar to those of atherosclerosis. Understanding these mechanisms could help to establish new therapeutic targets that might allow us to halt or at least slow down the progression of the disease. Early Steps in the Tissue Engineering of Intervertebral Discs https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2017/08/early-steps-in-the-tissue-engineering-of-intervertebral-discs/ In this paper, researchers report on progress towards the manufacture of interver...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 27, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

The 2017 Summer Scholars Working at the SENS Research Foundation
Each year, the SENS Research Foundation accepts a group of young life science academics and puts them to work on projects in aging research, both at the foundation and in allied laboratories, creating ties between research groups that can help to advance the state of the art. This year's batch has worked on a diverse set of projects that spread out beyond core SENS initiatives such as allotopic expression of mitochondrial genes. Reading through their projects is a reminder that a great deal can be accomplished these days given a small team, a little funding, and an equipped laboratory. Progress in medical research is no lo...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 26, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Healthy Life Extension Community Source Type: blogs

Ultrasound to Improve Effectiveness of Cancer Drugs: Interview with Focused Ultrasound Foundation ’s Jessica Foley, PhD
Most people think of ultrasound as an imaging modality. Yet, there are many other clinical uses for the high frequency soundwaves. Focused ultrasound waves can promote the opening of the blood-brain barrier, and they can be used to ablate fibroids, among other uses. Yet the potential of ultrasound in clinical medicine is far from fully realized, as new uses and studies evaluating them are rapidly sprouting, and a particularly interesting one involving checkpoint inhibitors to treat stage IV metastatic breast cancer is about to begin. To get a sense for how ultrasound can improve cancer care in combination with checkpoint i...
Source: Medgadget - August 10, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Medicine News Source Type: blogs

Johns Hopkins Atlas of Surgical Neuropathology now available on iTunes
Dr. EberhartDr. RodriquezSurgical neuropathology is the focus of volume 3 in the Johns Hopkins Atlases of Pathology.This app was released on March 3, 2017 for iPad download for only $4.99 . Authors Charles Eberhart and Fausto Rodriquez introduce us to the next generation in surgical neuropathology reference with a variety of educational features, updates to the 2016 WHO grading system system for CNS tumors, algorithms for the evaluation of diffuse gliomas, and practice quizzes. Congratulations to Drs. Eberhart and Rodriguez on the creation of a magnificent product! (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - March 7, 2017 Category: Radiology Tags: websites Source Type: blogs

Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy: MRI
Case Report: 43 y Male, known retroviral  status with altered sensorium for MRI shows-Diffuse non-enhancing  T2 and FLAIR white matter hyperintensity in supratentorial white matter in all the lobes, middle cerebellar peduncles, right thalamus, corpus callosum  with mild mass effect over sulcal spaces& ventricles with subtle bright signal in DWI with sparing of grey matter& subcortical U fibers with unremarkable flow voids, dural sinuses,optic chiasm/intraventricular extension, midline extension. Prominent subependymal vessels& pachymeninges seen on contrast without nodularity. These findings...
Source: Sumer's Radiology Site - March 7, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Sumer Sethi Source Type: blogs

Mutant IDH1 and thrombosis in gliomas
Craig M. Horbinski, MD PhDDr. Craig Horbinski ofNorthwestern University and colleagues just published a significant paper inActa Neuropathologica entitledMutant IDH1 and thrombosis in gliomas. Horbinski's data suggests that, quoting the abstract, " mutant IDH1 has potent antithrombotic activity within gliomas and throughout the peripheral circulation. These findings have implications for the pathologic evaluation of gliomas, the effect of altered isocitrate metabolism on tumor microenvironment, and risk assessment of glioma patients for venous thromboemboli." It should be noted that this paper won theRubinst...
Source: neuropathology blog - October 4, 2016 Category: Radiology Tags: neoplasms neuropathologists Source Type: blogs

Society for Neuro-Oncology meeting to feature several prominent neuropathologists
David W. Ellison, MD, PhD,one of the presenters at the 2016 SNO meetingThe Society for Neuro-Oncology 2016 Annual Meeting to be held this year in Scottsdale, Arizona on November 16-20 will feature several members of theAmerican Association of Neuropathologists.Peter Canoll will be speaking on " Primary brain tumors – pathology, grading and prognosis – new WHO classification " .Arie Perry will be giving a " WHO overview " .Sandro Santagata will talk on " Advances in the molecular genetics of meningioma " .Dan Brat will present on " IDH-omas " .Cynthia Hawkin...
Source: neuropathology blog - September 29, 2016 Category: Radiology Tags: meetings neuropathologists Source Type: blogs

University of Colorado residents show up in force for CAP16
Left to right: Drs. Robinson, Greer, Roberts, Klein, and Graham (with me kneeling)Five PGY2 pathology residents, the most from a single class in the history of the institution, are presenting posters today and tomorrow at the annual meeting of the College of American Pathologists. Most are neuropathology related. Here are the titles:Caleb Graham,et al. Pilocytic Astrocytoma: A Diagnostic Consideration in Lateral Ventricular TumorsAshley Greer,et al. BRAF Mutational Status in Desmoplastic Infantile Astrocytoma/GangliogliomaColleen Klein,et al. Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis Discovered Clinically and at Autopsy: A Dual-I...
Source: neuropathology blog - September 26, 2016 Category: Radiology Tags: CAP16 abstracts meetings Source Type: blogs

CAP16 Abstract Highlights - Astrocytoma With a Distinct Molecular Signature: MYB Rearrangement and EGFR Amplification
We report the first case of a pediatric astrocytoma with both MYB rearrangement and EGFR amplification. A 3-year-old boy was found to have a T2 hyperintense, nonenhancing mass in theleft temporal lobe after minor head trauma. Histology showed a diffuse astrocytic tumor with low cell density and bland cytology. Mitotic figures were present, albeit focally, prompting a diagnosis of anaplastic astrocytoma. No necrosis or microvascular proliferation was identified. The Ki-67 labeling index, while generally low, rose to approximately 20%, corresponding to regions of mitotic activity. Interphase fluorescence in situ hybridizatio...
Source: neuropathology blog - September 20, 2016 Category: Radiology Tags: CAP16 abstracts molecular studies neoplasms Source Type: blogs

A Case of Chordoid Glioma of the Third Ventricle
A man in his sixties presented with disequilibrium and hypothermia.A 34 x 28 mm well-circumscribed 3rd ventricular massChordoid architecture with myxoid backgroundAdmixed plasma cells are characteristicChordoid Glioma, WHO grade II (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - August 9, 2016 Category: Radiology Tags: neoplasms Source Type: blogs

H3-K27M immunohistochemical positivity in a case of Diffuse Midline Glioma
(Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - August 2, 2016 Category: Radiology Tags: neoplasms Source Type: blogs

A 60-year-old man presents with acute confusion, aggressive behavior, and aphasia
T2-weighted FLAIR MRI A 60-year-old man presents with acute confusion, aggressive behavior, and aphasia. Imaging reveals a heterogeneously enhancing mass (5 x 2 x 2 cm) in the left medial temporal lobe with extensive peripheral edema (image above), but no significant contrast enhancement. A subtotal temporal lobectomy was performed on suspicion of a low-grade glioma.High-power view of biopsy from left temporal lobeThe diagnosis is herpes simplex encephalitis. PCR amplification of DNA from the specimen more specifically identified the causative agent as herpes simplex virus, type 1 (HSV1). The most common identifiable ...
Source: neuropathology blog - July 18, 2016 Category: Radiology Tags: infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Best Post of May 2016 -- MYB-QKI fusion: A novel alteration that may define and drive pediatric angiocentric glioma
The next in our "Best of the Month" series comes from May 12, 2016Angiiocentric gliomaAngiocentric glioma is a rare form of pediatric low-grade gliomas (PLGG), first described in 2005, that arises in the cerebral cortex and shares histological features of astrocytomas and ependymomas. Until now, nothing was known of the genetic events underlying this tumor type. In a recent study published in Nature Genetics, Bhandopadhayay et al (see reference below) used whole genome sequencing and/or RNAseq to show that all seven angiocentric gliomas in their sample set harbored rearrangements in MYB, the most c...
Source: neuropathology blog - June 28, 2016 Category: Radiology Tags: Best of the Month series neoplasms Source Type: blogs

2016 WHO Classification Brain Tumours
WHO brain tumour classification has been updated in 2016. The 2016 World Health Organization Classification of Tumors of the Central Nervous System is both a conceptual and practical advance over its 2007 predecessor. For the first time, the WHO classification of CNS tumors uses molecular parameters in addition to histology to define many tumor entities, thus formulating a concept for how CNS tumor diagnoses should be structured in the molecular era. 2016 CNS WHO presents major restructuring of the diffuse gliomas, medulloblastomas and other embryonal tumors, and incorporates new entities that are defined by both hist...
Source: Sumer's Radiology Site - June 26, 2016 Category: Radiology Authors: Sumer Sethi Source Type: blogs

Don't Believe Statistics
Back in college, I took a statistics class and had to write a paper about the skewing of statistics particularly as done in the media. I think I did pretty well on it. And I did learn not to believe statistics as presented anywhere without thinking about them.Here's an example: A recent study said that being married or having a college education made you more likely to get brain cancer. I'll bet that result was a surprise to the researchers. But you really need to dig a little deeper into the research to understand that isn't really the truth."Using a huge registry of health and other data on all Swedes, European rese...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - June 21, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: cancer research truth Source Type: blogs

American Association of Neuropathologists annual meeting is underway in Baltimore
Dr. Doug Anthony (in foreground) enjoys Special Course atAANP meeting todayThe 92nd Annual Meeting of the American Association of Neuropathologists opened today with a Special Course focusing on the neuropathology of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Additionally, two sessions focused on updates to the most recent WHO Classification of CNS Tumors. The day opened with a presentation by Walter Koroshetz, MD, director of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS). Dr. Koroshetz addressed advances in optical instrumentation in the imaging of brain trauma and the way in which neuropathologist...
Source: neuropathology blog - June 17, 2016 Category: Radiology Tags: meetings Source Type: blogs

Featured Neuropathologist: Roger McLendon, MD
Today I feature the inimitable Dr. Roger McLendon, director of neuropathology at Duke University. McLendon has made major contributions to the field in the area of molecular characterization of gliomas. He has also demonstrated a commitment to professional service, including his current work on the Neuropathology Committee of the College of American Pathologists. Check out this interview with one of the most influential neuropathologists practicing today.....Roger McLendon, MD1.    Why did you decide to become a neuropathologist?When I was in college, I asked a buddy of mine who was in vet school what c...
Source: neuropathology blog - June 9, 2016 Category: Radiology Tags: neuropathologists Source Type: blogs

False “balance” about Stanislaw Burzynski’s cancer quackery rears its ugly head again
One common theme that has been revisited time and time again on this blog since its very founding is the problem of how science and medicine are reported. For example, back when I first started blogging, one thing that used to drive me absolutely bonkers was the tendency of the press to include in any… (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - June 2, 2016 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Cancer Clinical trials Complementary and alternative medicine Pseudoscience Quackery Skepticism/critical thinking antineoplastons diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma DIPG fda Neil Fachon Stanislaw Burzynski Wendy Fachon Source Type: blogs

Summary of the Major Changes in the 2016 WHO Classification of CNS Tumors
Major restructuring of medulloblastomas, with incorporation of genetically defined entitiesAddition of brain invasion as a criterion for atypical meningiomaRestructuring of solitary fibrous tumor and hemangiopericytoma (SFT/HPC) as one entity and adapting a grading system to accommodate this changeExpansion and clarification of entities included in nerve sheath tumors, with addition of hybrid nerve sheath tumors and separation of melanotic schwannoma from other schwannomasExpansion of entities included in hematopoietic/lymphoid tumors of the CNS (lymphomas and histiocytic tumors)Addition of the following newly recognized e...
Source: neuropathology blog - May 27, 2016 Category: Radiology Tags: neoplasms Source Type: blogs

Glioblastoma: Radiopath Correlation Teaching Video
Glioblastoma (GBM) have a preferential spreading along the condensed white matter tracts such as corticospinal tracts and corpus callosum  and such appearance is called as butterfly glioma. Here is a video explaining the Radiopath correlation.Famous Radiology Blog http://www.sumerdoc.blogspot.com TeleRad Providers at www.teleradproviders.com Mail us at sales@teleradproviders.com (Source: Sumer's Radiology Site)
Source: Sumer's Radiology Site - May 19, 2016 Category: Radiology Authors: Sumer Sethi Source Type: blogs

LIVESTRONG Leader Spotlight: Christina
LIVESTRONG Leaders are individuals that make a yearly significant commitment to those in their community affected by cancer by spreading the message of LIVESTRONG. They do this by fundraising, hosting events, bringing LIVESTRONG resources to their local hospitals and more. One of our amazing leaders from Iowa, Tina Metz-Anderson, talks about why she is involved with LIVESTRONG and what she is doing in her community to help spread the LIVESTRONG message. What is your name, where are you from? Christina Metz-Anderson, Bettendorf, IA How are you affected by cancer? My family was affected by Cancer in 1975 when my mom was dia...
Source: LIVESTRONG Blog - April 4, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: LIVESTRONG Staff Source Type: blogs

Neurofibromatosis-I
Patient with multiple cutaneous lesions on MRI brain shows evidence of thickened and moderately T2 hyperintense optic chiasma with moderate post gadolinium enhancement anteriorly extending till the orbital apex. This may indicate optic glioma. There are areas of T2/FLAIR hyperintensity in the bilateral mesial  temporal regions, right globus pallidus region and right pontomesencephalic region, with no significant enhancement, Possible hamartomas. These findings along with cutaneous findings described could indicate diagnosis of Neurofibromatosis I.  Advised clinical correlation. The criteria for the diagnosis...
Source: Sumer's Radiology Site - July 1, 2014 Category: Radiologists Authors: Sumer Sethi Source Type: blogs

Horbinski Group develops online tool to estimate likelihood of IDH1/2 mutation in a glioma
Craig Horbinski, MD, PhD.The illustrious Craig Horbinski, MD, PhD wrote in to share a link to an online tool which his team developed which helps triage brain tumor cases that might benefit from additional molecular testing.   Here's what the University of Kentucky neuropathologist had to say about this new website: "We have developed an online-based tool to provide a statistical estimate of the likelihood of an IDH1/2 mutation in a glioma, basedon a few easily-obtained parameters. Several variables like patient age, WHO grade, etc. are well-known to correlate with mutations, but no formula has yet been developed...
Source: neuropathology blog - June 16, 2014 Category: Pathologists Tags: molecular studies Source Type: blogs

Stanislaw Burzynski publishes his antineoplaston results again. It’s no more convincing than last time.
Here we go again. Two months ago, I noted that Dr. Stanislaw Burzynski, the Polish expatriate physician who started out as a legitimate medical researcher and then in the late 1970s took a turn away from science-based medicine and towards being a “brave maverick doctor” through his discovery in blood and urine of substances he… (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - June 9, 2014 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Cancer Clinical trials Complementary and alternative medicine antineoplastons Crystin Schiff glioma Journal of Cancer Therapy phenylacetate Ric Schiff Stanislaw Burzynski Source Type: blogs

Orphan Drugs - The Seattle Times explains
The mining of rare diseasesThirty years ago, Congress acted to spur research on rare diseases. Today, we have hundreds of new drugs — along with runaway pricing and market manipulation, as drugmakers turn a law with good intentions into a profit engine.By Michael J. Berens and Ken ArmstrongHer vision failed first.Then she fell asleep at school from inexplicable fatigue. Even walking proved difficult, often impossible, as she knocked into furniture and walls. It was like an electrical switch in her body toggled without warning. Some days she was in control, most she was not.Specialists we...
Source: PharmaGossip - November 11, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: insider Source Type: blogs

New Laser Imaging Technique Highlights Brain Tumors Among Healthy Tissue
This image of a human glioblastoma brain tumor in the brain of a mouse was made with stimulated Raman scattering, or SRS, microscopy. The technique allows the tumor (blue) to be easily distinguished from normal tissue (green) based on faint signals emitted by tissue with different cellular structures. Intracranial cancers usually look the same as the healthy tissue surrounding them. With tumor resection in the brain, it is particularly important to remove the whole of the tumor while damaging as little normal brain matter as possible. A number of techniques exist for differentiating tumors, but each has its limitations. No...
Source: Medgadget - September 5, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Editors Tags: in the news... Source Type: blogs

Dr. Marta Couce joins neuropathology staff at Case Western
Dr. Marta E. CouceMarta E. Couce, MD, PhD, will be joining the staff of University Hospitals of Cleveland, Case Western Reserve University  next week. She will teaming up to handle surgical neuropathology with the illustrious Dr. Mark Cohen, who has been on staff at Case since 1993.Dr. Couce attended Medical School in Santiago de Compostela, Spain. She pursued her graduate school training at the same University in the Department of Pathology.  After research stints at East Carolina University and the Mayo Clinic, Dr. Couce did her training in Anatomic Pathology at Yale New Haven Hospital, followed by two fellowsh...
Source: neuropathology blog - September 4, 2013 Category: Pathologists Tags: neuropathologists Source Type: blogs

Resident's Flash Card: Neurofibromatosis
Neurofibromatosis - I (von Recklinghausen’s disease) - autosomal dominant (abnormality is on chromosome 17) - diagnostic criteria include six or more cafe-au-lait spots, axillary or inguinal freckling, two (or more) neurofibromas, optic glioma (most common CNS neoplasm - occurs in 30-90% and is bilateral in 10-20%), iris hamartoma, distinctive osseous lesions, or a first-degree relative with NF-1 - hypertension may be found with renal artery fibromuscular dysplasia - neurofibromas can occur in the urinary and gastrointestinal tracts - increased incidence of all types of neoplasms  - malignant transformatio...
Source: Sumer's Radiology Site - August 19, 2013 Category: Radiologists Authors: Sumer Sethi Source Type: blogs

New Hydrogel Lab Technique Allows for Creating Precise Environments for 3D Tumor Growth
Glioma (brain cancer) cells growing in a 3-D hydrogel. The green fluorescent dye reflects the cytoskeletons of the cells. Scale bar is 50 mm. | Photo courtesy Brendan Harley Tumor growth is very much affected by its biochemical environment, but studying how all that happens requires creating special biomaterials that can sustain the growth of the tumor in three dimensions and allow for experiments to be conducted. Hydrogels have been used to grow volumes of glioma tumors in the lab, but now researchers at University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign are reporting the development of a new technique that allows them to grow tumo...
Source: Medgadget - August 1, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Editors Tags: in the news... Source Type: blogs

What about this cell with red granular cytoplasm?
I'm working on a high-grade glioma and am coming across scattered presumably neoplastic cells that have course red granular cytoplasm. How does one interpret such cells? Does it raise the possibility of a granular cell astrocytoma? Or are these often present and I've just ignored them until now? Thanks for any help you might be able to provide in the comments section! (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - July 25, 2013 Category: Pathologists Tags: neoplasms Source Type: blogs

Eight Toxic Foods: A Little Chemical Education
Many people who read this blog are chemists. Those who aren't often come from other branch of the sciences, and if they don't, it's safe to say that they're at least interested in science (or they probably don't hang around very long!) It's difficult, if you live and work in this sort of environment, to keep in mind what people are willing to believe about chemistry. But that's what we have the internet for. Many science-oriented bloggers have taken on what's been called "chemophobia", and they've done some great work tearing into some some really uninformed stuff out there. But nonsense does not obey any conser...
Source: In the Pipeline - June 21, 2013 Category: Chemists Tags: Toxicology Source Type: blogs

Is this a nodular subcortical heterotopia- neonatal brain ultrasound
This neonate shows a large (3.5 cms.) sized lesion in the Rt. cerebral hemisphere. What do these neonatal brain ultrasound images portray? Is it a case of neonatal nodular subcortical heterotopia or is it an ICSOL due to intracerebral bleed or some form of glioma?See this link: Radiology (AJNR) article on disorders of cortical formation (Source: cochinblogs)
Source: cochinblogs - April 22, 2013 Category: Radiologists Source Type: blogs