Podcast: Life with Binge Eating Disorder
  At one point, Gabe weighed more than 550 pounds. Today, he and Lisa remember and discuss the extreme pain and slow healing process of living with binge-eating disorder. Gabe shares his shame in being so overweight, his intense relationship with food, the story of his gastric bypass and the difficult process of learning new coping mechanisms. How did Gabe’s bipolar and panic attacks tie in with his binge eating? And, importantly, how is he managing the illness today? Join us for an open and honest discussion on living with an eating disorder. (Transcript Available Below) Please Subscribe to Our Show: And We...
Source: World of Psychology - July 21, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Not Crazy Podcast Tags: Binge Eating Disorders Eating Disorders General Not Crazy Podcast Source Type: blogs

I Joined Twitter to Teach
I joined Twitter to teach. In May 2016, I started tweeting “questions of the day” for my inpatient hospital medicine team at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital from @RJmdphilly. #GreenQOD (“Green” is our teaching service, and “QOD” for question of the day) was born in the days of only 140 characters per tweet (now expanded to 280), which placed a potentially daunting onus on brevity in phrasing—and answering—clinical questions. My inaugural question? “What’s the real story with beta blockers in reactive airway disease? If increase risk is real, how do yo...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - June 30, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Guest Perspective social media teaching Twitter Source Type: blogs

Weight loss can help head off lasting damage caused by fatty liver
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is the most common cause of liver disease in the United States, and is estimated to affect up to a quarter of adults in the world. It is defined by excess fat accumulating in the liver and usually occurs in people with obesity, high blood sugars (diabetes), abnormal cholesterol or triglyceride levels, or high blood pressure. These disorders often run together and as a group are called metabolic syndrome. The “non-alcoholic” part of “non-alcoholic fatty liver disease” is important to distinguish it from alcohol-related liver disease, which can also cause excess liver...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - April 30, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Irun Bhan, MD Tags: Diet and Weight Loss Digestive Disorders Source Type: blogs

Weight-loss surgery may lower risk of heart disease in people with diabetes
Obesity is a serious, chronic, treatable, and global disease epidemic. Over 98 million people currently have the disease of obesity, and in a recent New England Journal of Medicine article, Harvard researchers predicted that by 2030, 50% of the population in the United States will have the disease of obesity. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is significantly associated with obesity. While many people with obesity do not have diabetes, most people with T2D have the disease of obesity. Excess adiposity (body fat storage), which is present in obesity, contributes to many chronic diseases beyond T2D. These include high blood pressure, he...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - April 16, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Angela Fitch, MD Tags: Diabetes Diet and Weight Loss Health Heart Health Surgery Source Type: blogs

Podcast | Chronic Illness and Depression
 After receiving two chronic illness diagnosis by the age of 24, it really was no surprise that host Jackie Zimmerman also started to experience depression. Unable to tackle both, Jackie chose to focus on her physical health, letting her mental health deteriorate quickly — and dangerously. In this episode, we discuss the mind-body connection and how when your body is sick, your mind can quickly follow.   (Transcript Available Below) SUBSCRIBE & REVIEW About The Not Crazy Podcast Hosts Gabe Howard is an award-winning writer and speaker who lives with bipolar disorder. He is the author of the popular b...
Source: World of Psychology - December 2, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Not Crazy Podcast Tags: Antidepressant Depression Medications Not Crazy Podcast Stress Suicide Trauma Source Type: blogs

Bariatric surgery . . . . for kids?!
  That’s precisely what the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) is recommending: more weight loss surgery for overweight kids. This sort of perverted advice reflects the deep and widespread failure of the healthcare system to address nutrition and health, resorting instead to an awful surgical “solution” that, contrary to the AAP’s declaration that it is a proven safe option, is filled with complications, nutritional deficiencies, dysbiotic alterations in bowel flora, hormonal disruptions, and—not all that rarely—death. (Granted that it was over 10 years ago, but the first patient ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - October 31, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Open bariatric surgery gastric bypass lap bad Weight Loss wheat belly Source Type: blogs

High Risk Surgical Patients Have Lower Mortality Rates at Major Teaching Hospitals
I firmly believe that it's important to get oneself to a major teaching hospital if you fall into the category of a high risk, general surgery patient. A recent article put some numbers to this advice (see:High risk patients have lower mortality rates at major teaching hospitals). Below is an excerpt from the article:New research published in the Annals of Surgery shows that high-risk general surgery patients have greater survival rates at major teaching hospitals than at non-teaching hospitals....The 30-day mortality rate for these high-risk patients was 15.9% at major teaching hospitals, compared with 18.2% at n...
Source: Lab Soft News - October 30, 2019 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Bruce Friedman Tags: Cost of Healthcare Healthcare Delivery Hospital Financial Medical Research Population Health Public Health Quality of Care Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Bad Habits and Vices Related to Mental Illness
 Everyone has bad habits. Even your sainted Granny who seems perfect to you has some bad habit that only your grandfather knows about. Bad habits, like everything, exist on a spectrum, from biting your nails to snorting cocaine – and everything in between. In this episode, our hosts discuss bad habits that many people with mental illness seem to have – from smoking, to alcoholism, to drug use and, you guessed it, everything in between.   SUBSCRIBE & REVIEW “90% of people with schizophrenia smoke.” – Michelle Hammer   Highlights From ‘Bad Habits Mental Illness&rs...
Source: World of Psychology - April 15, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast Tags: A Bipolar, A Schizophrenic, and a Podcast Addiction Habits Schizophrenia Stress Source Type: blogs

Confusion after gastric bypass with Roux-en-Y
At at recent case conference, we discussed a woman who had had a gastric bypass 20 years previously, and now had confusion. To remind you of the details of a gastric bypass: First, a small stomach pouch, approximately one ounce or 30 milliliters in volume, is created by dividing the top of the stomach from the rest of the stomach. Next, the first portion of the small intestine is divided, and the bottom end of the divided small intestine is brought up and connected to the newly created small stomach pouch. The procedure is completed by connecting the top portion of the divided small intestine to the small intestine furt...
Source: DB's Medical Rants - April 1, 2019 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: rcentor Tags: Medical Rants Source Type: blogs

How to Use MRI for Measuring Liver Fat Levels in Patients Who Have Undergone Bariatric Surgery
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an effective method for measuring liver fat levels in obese patients who undergone weight loss surgery, according to researchers from the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health.In their  studyrecently published inRadiology, the researchers set to out to determine how bariatric surgery influences changes in liver fat. Gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy have successfully helped obese patients lose weight. However, physicians are mostly in the dark about how these surgeries lower liver fat, since it ’s challenging to quantify liver fat non-invasively, and...
Source: radRounds - December 29, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Weight Loss Implant Simulates Food Inside Stomach
There are millions of clinicians fighting on the front lines of the obesity epidemic every day, but there doesn’t seem to be a winning strategy. The population of seriously overweight people around the world is rising and will soon reach one billion. At the University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers may have a technological, drug-free solution to the problem for many of those afflicted. The team developed a tiny battery-free implant that’s only about a centimeter across, which stimulates the vagus nerve, and in turn the brain. The device is attached to the stomach, which it can sense moving, as happens when fo...
Source: Medgadget - December 20, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: GI Medicine Neurology Rehab Source Type: blogs

PCOS: A man-made situation
Most mainstream doctors believe that polycystic ovary syndrome, PCOS, is a disease. PCOS is, after all, associated with markedly increased risk for type 2 diabetes, hypertension, endometrial cancer, and heart disease, in addition to outward signs that include excessive facial and body hair, tendency to being overweight or obese, irregular menstrual cycles, infertility. A crisis of self esteem commonly and understandably results. Mainstream doctors tell you to not worry because they have plenty of prescription drugs to “treat” it, not to mention various hormones, fertility procedures, and gastric bypass. PCOS is...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - September 6, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates acne facial change facial hair gluten-free grain-free grains Inflammation pcos polycystic ovary testosterone undoctored Weight Loss wheat belly Source Type: blogs

MKSAP: 49-year-old woman with obesity, hypertension, and type 2 diabetes mellitus
Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 49-year-old woman is evaluated during a follow-up visit. She is overweight and has hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus, both of which are well controlled. For several years, she has attempted to lose weight through various commercial diets; dietician-monitored, calorie-restricted diets; and physical activity. She has worked with a behavioral therapist, and although she has not achieved weight loss, her weight has remained stable. She exercises 30 minutes daily. Medical history is also remarkable ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 1, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/mksap" rel="tag" > mksap < /a > Tags: Conditions Obesity Primary Care Source Type: blogs

My exit ramp from medicine
One day, I was full of moderate despair, overworked, befuddled by the EHR with a tinge of burnout, staring at my computer, I treated myself to something I’ve not done before. It was my 62nd birthday that day, and I gave myself a birthday present. Before rising from that swivel chair, I had written down on a sticky pad the day that would be my retirement date, exactly one year after the expiration of my contract which I would be willing to extend no more than another year. We try to keep ourselves productive in life because it is finite. Having my professional years identifiably finite would keep the remaining time fo...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 12, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/richard-plotzker" rel="tag" > Richard Plotzker, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Endocrinology Practice Management Source Type: blogs

Dr. Google: The top 10 health searches in 2017
Follow me on Twitter @RobShmerling Ever wonder what other people are wondering about? I know I do. So, here are the top 10 health searches in Google for 2017. And just so you don’t have to look each one up, I’ve provided a brief answer. You’re welcome. 1.  What causes hiccups? I was surprised this one made it to the top 10 list of health searches. Maybe this search is common because hiccups are as mysterious as they are universal. I’ve written about hiccups before, but let’s just say the cause in any individual person is rarely known or knowable. Then again, the reason hiccups stop is als...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - February 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Health Source Type: blogs

Calcium, vitamin D, and fractures (oh my!)
When I saw the headlines about this recently published study on bone health saying “Vitamin D and calcium supplements may not lower fracture risk” I thought: Wait, that’s news? I think I remember seeing that headline a few years ago. Indeed, in 2015, this very blog reported on similar studies of calcium supplements, noting that calcium supplements have risks and side effects, and are not likely indicated for most healthy community-dwelling adults over 50. These folks are not in a high-risk category for vitamin deficiencies, osteoporosis, and fractures, and we usually advise them to get their calcium from ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - February 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Monique Tello, MD, MPH Tags: Drugs and Supplements Health Osteoporosis Source Type: blogs

Better cardiovascular outcomes with gastric bypass surgery
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - October 8, 2017 Category: Internal Medicine Tags: cardiovascular gastroenterology Source Type: blogs

The Proof is the Bottle
​An 18-year-old woman presented for altered mental status. EMS reported that she was at a beach party when she became unresponsive. Friends said she may have been drinking alcohol, but denied other illicit drug use. Initial vital signs included a blood pressure of 117/69 mm Hg, heart rate of 110 bpm, respiratory rate of 11 bpm, SPO2 99% on room air, and a temperature of 98.9°F. ​The patient was somnolent and reacted intermittently to physical stimuli on exam. She intermittently moved all four extremities. Her gag reflex was intact. Pupils were 4 mm bilaterally reactive without nystagmus. She had tachycardia, her lu...
Source: The Tox Cave - October 2, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Podcast: What Does Binge Eating Disorder Feel Like?
In this episode of the Psych Central Show, hosts Gabe Howard and Vincent M. Wales discuss Binge Eating Disorder. At his heaviest, Gabe weighed 550 pounds. He describes in detail how he went from a “normal-sized” guy to being morbidly obese, his return to being “normal-sized,” and addresses the question of whether he was, in fact, addicted to food. During the second half of the show, our hosts welcome Lisa, a woman who was with Gabe during this period of his life. She shares her experience of what it was like being with someone with binge eating disorder and how he finally confronted it. * Sho...
Source: World of Psychology - August 31, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Gabe Howard Tags: Binge Eating General The Psych Central Show Source Type: blogs

Doctors should fight fake health news at the checkout aisle
I see them every time I wait in the inescapably long lines at the grocery store. They’re offering me so much. Fat-melting foods that “work like gastric bypass.” Sleep masks that prevent breast cancer. One day diets. And, of course, the perennial “medical miracles.” All these revelations can be mine with a simple magazine purchase. It’s easy to dismiss the medical advice being propagated through the supermarket checkout aisle. Who would take health advice from a magazine sitting next to a box of Snickers and the National Enquirer? This visceral elitism, however, is causing doctors and sci...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 24, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/benjamin-mazer" rel="tag" > Benjamin Mazer, MD, MBA < /a > Tags: Physician Primary care Source Type: blogs

From “do no harm” to “reduce harm.” It’s time to change the paradigm
The concept of “First, do no harm,” which is embedded in the oath that kicks off the careers of most new doctors in America, has become something of a surrogate for the practice of medicine. But it’s something of a false promise. Doctors routinely cause their patients harm. The oath we should be taking is, “Help others with as little harm as possible.” We live in a world of harm — from car accidents to recreational drugs, sexually transmitted diseases, cancer, unhealthy diets, and lack of exercise. The list goes on. In treating the outcomes of these hazards, the goal as a physician ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 10, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/amy-ho" rel="tag" > Amy Ho, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Primary care Source Type: blogs

Doctors Should Also Be Fighting “ Fake News ”
BY BENJAMIN MAZER, MD I see them every time I wait in the inescapably long lines at grocery store. They’re offering me so much. Fat-melting foods that “work like gastric bypass.” Sleep masks that prevent breast cancer. One day diets. And, of course, the perennial “medical miracles.” All these revelations can be mine with a simple magazine purchase. It’s easy to dismiss the medical advice being propagated through the supermarket checkout aisle. Who would take health advice from a magazine sitting next to a box of Snickers and the National Enquirer? This visceral elitism, however, is caus...
Source: The Health Care Blog - June 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Andrew Weil Benjamin Mazer Fake News Mehmet Oz Quackery Source Type: blogs

I ’ ll let you in on an industry secret
The unspoken secret is that healthcare providers prefer treatment over prevention, expensive over inexpensive, patent-protectable over non-patent-protectable, billable procedure over nonbillable procedure, BMW over Toyota Prius. Spiraling healthcare costs are the expected result because greater revenues are built into the basic principles that drive the system. The endless year-over-year increase in your health insurance premiums should therefore come as no surprise because this system is designed to take more and more of your money. Health care is a business, a big business (the biggest business of all in the United Stat...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - April 18, 2017 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates Source Type: blogs

What do you get for your money?
Shouldn’t the most expensive healthcare in the world also buy you the greatest health in the world? If you pay $600-$1500 per month for a high-deductible health insurance policy for your family, does that mean that you and your family will enjoy better health? Because Americans spend nearly $10,000 per person per year on healthcare—-more than any other country on the planet, double the spending of the U.K., Canada, and Australia-—does this mean that Americans pay more and thereby enjoy better health? Less diabetes, less heart disease, less obesity, fewer cases of autoimmune disease, less arthritis, etc.?...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - April 15, 2017 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Undoctored gluten grains health healthcare Inflammation Weight Loss wheat Source Type: blogs

Is there HEALING in healthcare?
Has the idea of healing people back to health been lost from modern healthcare? Have you seen all those billboards and ads luring you into hospitals, surgeries, and other high-ticket medical procedures? Why run ads for electrophysiologic studies, implantable defibrillators, lap-band/gastric bypass, and cancer chemotherapy? Easy: Because that’s where the money is. If healing were truly the driving theme behind today’s healthcare, then the whole approach would be different. Conversations with health care providers would focus on prevention and identifying and reversing causes instead of expensive procedures. The...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - April 3, 2017 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Undoctored health healthcare healthcare costs predatory Source Type: blogs

Vitamin D: What ’s the “right” level?
Many of my patients who come into the office for their physical exams ask to have their vitamin D levels checked. They may have a family member with osteoporosis, or perhaps they have had bone thinning themselves. Mostly, they want to know that they’re doing everything they can to keep their bones strong. Vitamin D is critical for healthy bones. But when we check that blood level, how to act on the result is the subject of great controversy in medical-research land. Pinpointing a “healthy” vitamin D level is tricky So, what is the current cutoff value at which people are considered “low,” and ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - December 19, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Monique Tello, MD, MPH Tags: Drugs and Supplements Health Healthy Eating Source Type: blogs

Obalon Non-Surgical Weight Loss System: Interview with Andy Rasdal, CEO of Obalon Therapeutics.
Medgadget recently reported on the FDA approval of the Obalon balloon system, which assists weight-loss in obese patients who have failed to lose weight by other means and is an alternative to conventional gastric bypass surgery. The system has been developed by Obalon Therapeutics, a company out of Carlsbad, California, and consists of inflatable balloons that can be inserted into the stomach in a minimally invasive manner. The treatment involves swallowing a deflated balloon in the form of a small capsule attached to a thin tube. Once in the stomach, the balloon is inflated and the tube is withdrawn. A maximum of up to t...
Source: Medgadget - November 30, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Exclusive GI Medicine Source Type: blogs

Obalon Swallowable Balloon for Weight Loss FDA Approved
Gastric bypass surgery, just like any other surgery, hold potential for intraprocedural problems and follow-up complications. Less invasive means of reducing the volume of the stomach are coming to market. One particularly interesting system called Obalon just received FDA approval to help obese people to reduce weight who failed to do so through diet and exercise. The system was developed by Obalon Therapeutics, a company out of Carlsbad, California. It revolves around a swallowable balloon that looks like a large pill that has a tube attached to it that is used to pump up the balloon once it’s in the...
Source: Medgadget - September 15, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Editors Tags: GI Medicine Source Type: blogs

Teleflex 2nd Generation Percuvance Uses 5mm Laparoscopic Tools on 2.9mm Shaft
Teleflex (Morrisville, NC) is releasing the second generation of its Percuvance Percutaneous Surgical System, which allows surgeons to attach 5mm-wide laparoscopic tools while using only a 2.9mm shaft. The Percuvance shaft is inserted directly through the skin, requiring no trocar through which to operate. In order to attach tools that are wider than the shaft, the shaft is pushed through an already existing trocar on the opposite side of the abdominal wall. Once the tip peeks out, the existing instrument can be screwed off and another screwed on. Simply pull back into the abdomen to continue the procedure. Below...
Source: Medgadget - August 23, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Editors Tags: Ob/Gyn Surgery Urology Source Type: blogs

Wheat Belly does not end at weight loss
Misty joins the ranks of people whose physical and facial appearance has undergone a dramatic transformation by living the Wheat Belly lifestyle. “I have been eating the Wheat Belly way for 2 months. I have lost 18 lbs. I went off blood pressure meds. I was having really bad stomach pains and they have disappeared. I was losing a lot of hair and had a very dry scalp and both have improved a lot. I can tell a big difference in my stomach and legs. I don’t have many ‘before’ pics and the pics I am posting are different angles.The first pic is from May, 2015.” You can count calories or points a...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - December 30, 2015 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Success Stories acid reflux bloating gluten grains hair loss IBS Inflammation rash Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

Evidence for Type 2 Diabetes to be Caused Specifically by Excess Fat in the Pancreas
This study determined whether the decrease in pancreatic triacylglycerol during weight loss in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is simply reflective of whole-body fat or specific to diabetes and associated with the simultaneous recovery of insulin secretory function. Individuals listed for gastric bypass surgery who had T2DM or normal glucose tolerance (NGT) matched for age, weight, and sex were studied before and 8 weeks after surgery. Pancreas and liver triacylglycerol were quantified. Weight loss after surgery was similar, as was the change in fat mass. Pancreatic triacylglycerol did not change in NGT but decreased in t...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 3, 2015 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Obesity Is Not Like Being "Addicted to Food"
Credit: Image courtesy of Aalto UniversityIs it possible to be “addicted” to food, much like an addiction to substances (e.g., alcohol, cocaine, opiates) or behaviors (gambling, shopping, Facebook)? An extensive and growing literature uses this terminology in the context of the “obesity epidemic”, and looks for the root genetic and neurobiological causes (Carlier et al., 2015; Volkow & Bailer, 2015).Fig. 1 (Meule, 2015). Number of scientific publications on food addiction (1990-2014). Web of Science search term “food addiction”. Figure 1 might lead you to believe that the term &ldquo...
Source: The Neurocritic - November 10, 2015 Category: Neuroscience Authors: The Neurocritic Source Type: blogs

Ann still going strong
Ann provided these photos, a “before” on the left and her most recent update on the right. “That’s a picture 5 years ago that was not at my heaviest. I was about 300 pounds in the picture.” You may remember Ann from two previous Wheat Belly Blog posts: April, 2015 and a June, 2015 update. Ann began her Wheat Belly journey in October, 2014 after being put on a waiting list for gastric bypass surgery while plagued with rheumatoid arthritis, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), migraine headaches, chronic hives, asthma, chronic pain and other conditions. She did n...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - August 25, 2015 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Success Stories autoimmune gluten grains Inflammation Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

The truth about hypoglycemia
I’ve received this question a number of times over the years: “I have episodes of hypoglycemia that make me really tired, foggy, and shaky. My doctor says to drink a glass of orange juice or eat some candy immediately and it works. But what should I do on the Wheat Belly lifestyle?” First of all, let’s put aside hypoglycemia–low blood sugars, generally 70 mg/dl (3.8 mmol/L) or less–that occurs in people with diabetes. In diabetics, it is a matter of making adjustments in insulin or other medications, or avoiding blood sugar drops during exercise, sleep, or prolonged periods of not eating...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - July 26, 2015 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle diabetes hypoglycemia insulin low-carb pre-diabetes Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

Maryland’s Maverick Health Care Overhaul: A Physician Perspective
Beginning last year, the state of Maryland embarked on an extraordinary new experiment — one that could be a model for the nation. In partnership with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), Governor Martin O’Malley’s statewide hospital commission announced in January 2014 that it would address escalating health care costs by tackling the arms race of medical care. The Commission unveiled the framework for a new plan that will pay hospitals for quality over quantity, enabling them to profit from providing more appropriate—rather than simply more—care. The proposed change of incen...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - July 20, 2015 Category: Health Management Authors: Martin Makary and Seth Goldstein Tags: Costs and Spending Featured Health Professionals Hospitals Organization and Delivery Population Health Public Health Quality AHRQ fee-for-service Martin Makary Martin O'Malley Maryland Patient Safety Prevention RVU targets Source Type: blogs

More Evidence that Gastric Bypass is NOT a Cure for Diabetes
(Source: Diabetes Update)
Source: Diabetes Update - May 26, 2015 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: blogs

An astounding chronicle of a Wheat Belly transformation
Ann began messaging me back in October, 2014, when she told me that she was on a waiting list for gastric bypass. Ann’s chronicle covers the full range of the ways wheat can destroy health and the ways health is restored by removing it. She also learned that there is no such thing as a wheat or grain “indulgence.” October 25, 2014 “Thank you for ending my years of pain and suffering and countless pills. I was ready to give up because I couldn’t take the pain anymore. After only a few days, I felt so much better and now after only a couple of months I am a new person. I went for a ride in my w...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - April 3, 2015 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Success Stories gastric bypass grains joint pain Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

Natalie’s breathtaking facial tranformation
Here is yet another jaw-dropping change in appearance by following a lifestyle free of all inflammation-provoking wheat and grains. Natalie reports being free of all grains for two years to achieve this transformation. Think of the contortions people go through to achieve similar changes: botox, filler injections, even lap-band or gastric bypass. Yet the wonderful transformations you witness on these pages were all achieved by making a simple shift in food choices. The post Natalie’s breathtaking facial tranformation appeared first on Dr. William Davis. (Source: Wheat Belly Blog)
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - March 31, 2015 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Success Stories edema facial transformations gluten-free grains skin Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, February 6, 2015
From MedPage Today: What Is the Real Cost of a New Knee? Assuming current eligibility criteria for total knee arthroplasty (TKA), the per patient lifetime cost attributable to symptomatic knee OA is $12,400, which represents about 10% of total direct medical costs in patients with OA. Attitudes Affected Outcome in HIV Prevention Trial. In the last analysis, the reasons for a negative outcome of an HIV prevention trial came down to people and their attitudes about the virus and the drugs intended to prevent it. Mixed Results for Switch vs. Bypass in Severe Obesity. Patients with a body mass index of 50 to 60 who under...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 6, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: News Infectious disease Obesity Orthopedics Source Type: blogs

Hospital Weights Adjusted Downward After Thanksgiving, Scoring Patient Satisfaction Win!
Memphis, TN -- A nurse at Grover Hospital struck clinical gold Monday by recalibrating hospital scales back 10 pounds, 20 pounds, 40 pounds, even 100 pounds and more - in the weekend  aftermath of Thursday's annual Thanksgiving Day bing - to try and win the third annual Most Improved Patient Satisfaction Scores Floor Contest.Customers admitted after the holiday feast will often complain to nurses they gained too much weight gorging on turkey and stuffing.  So Brian Jamison, the good looking male nurse known hospital wide for his inappropriate comments, decided to take matters into his own hand...
Source: The Happy Hospitalist - December 1, 2014 Category: Internists and Doctors of Medicine Authors: Tamer Mahrous Source Type: blogs

Lori’s Amazing Transformation…
Lori just sent me these photos – before and after pictures from her gastric bypass surgery. Isn’t that amazing?  I barely recognize her from her before picture. (Source: The 4th Avenue Blues)
Source: The 4th Avenue Blues - August 6, 2014 Category: Mental Illness Authors: Andrew Quixote Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, June 26, 2014
From MedPage Today: Drug Discounts Have Pharma Crying Foul. In 1992, the federal government told drug manufacturers they had to give steep discounts to hospitals that treat a large percentage of poor patients. Quitting Snus After MI May Lower Death Risk. Stopping the use of smokeless tobacco after a myocardial infarction (MI) may carry benefits similar to quitting smoking. FDA: No Clear Sign of Harm With Olmesartan in Diabetics. The evidence linking use of the angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) olmesartan in patients with diabetes and increased cardiovascular risk is not conclusive, according to a completed FDA sa...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 26, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: News Diabetes Endocrinology Heart Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, June 12, 2014
From MedPage Today: Men: Want to Be Healthy for the Rest of Your Life? Marriage is good for a man’s health. And it’s actually having a marriage license that matters — not just living with a partner, according to data from the 2011-2012 National Health Interview Survey. Diabetes: Out-of-Pocket Costs Soar in T2D. Out-of-pocket costs for type 2 diabetes patients have risen with wider uptake of insulin analogs. Bariatric Surgery Pays Off Long-Term in Diabetes. Gastric bypass beat diet and lifestyle for helping obese patients with type 2 diabetes shed both their disease and its long-term consequences. In...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 12, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: News Diabetes Obesity Source Type: blogs

No Longer Count Calories And Lose Weight Like Sarah
Sarah relates this story of how, after years of struggle with health and weight, she finally found the answer. Her story is especially interesting as she worked in the weight loss industry. “I have struggled all my life with my weight and food was always my comforter. In my late 30′s, I managed to lose 40 kg [88 lbs] and reach my goal weight with a major weight loss company in which I became a consultant. But, if I was previously fat and unhappy, I was now thin and unhappy. My years of chronic low-fat dieting led me to develop binge eating disorder. I felt like such a fraud and I was struggling to maintain my...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - April 29, 2014 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Sarah no longer counts calories
Sarah relates this story of how, after years of struggle with health and weight, she finally found the answer. Her story is especially interesting as she worked in the weight loss industry. “I have struggled all my life with my weight and food was always my comforter. “In my late 30′s, I managed to lose 40 kg [88 lbs] and reach my goal weight with a major weight loss company in which I became a consultant. But, if I was previously fat and unhappy, I was now thin and unhappy. My years of chronic low-fat dieting led me to develop binge eating disorder. I felt like such a fraud and I was struggling to main...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - April 29, 2014 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Wheat Belly success stories keep on pouring in!
In my public talks, I point out that the enormous success of the Wheat Belly message has little to do with me, but succeeds because 1) it works, and 2) people share their extravagant successes nowadays via social media and word spreads like wild fire. That’s what has caused the Wheat Belly message to turn the nutritional world topsy-turvy, upsetting dietitians accustomed to talking about “healthy whole grains,” and terrorized people in the grain and milling industries. I never tire of hearing these stories. Not just do people lose the weight they’ve struggled with for years, but they also experienc...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - March 1, 2014 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat-elimination success stories Source Type: blogs

Christie Gets a Band
I hadblogged a while ago about New Jersey governor Chris Christie's angry response to a former White House physician's opinion that he needed to think about losing some weight.  Christie basically told the doc she needed to mind her own business.  My take was that, morbid obesity being a risk factor for coronary artery disease, stroke, and early death, Christie's weight would be a issue I considered if and when he decided to run for the Presidency in 2016.  In order to be reassured that he could withstand the stress and pressure of being the leader of the world's only superpower, I i...
Source: Buckeye Surgeon - May 9, 2013 Category: Surgery Authors: Jeffrey Parks MD FACS Source Type: blogs