Secrets Behind the Curtain
“Doc to the radio phone,” went the call over the PA. This is often just medics notifying about a diabetic refusing transport or stopping a futile code, though like most of emergency medicine, it can be anything. Then we heard, “STEMI. Activating prehospital.” EMS had been called to the house of a 54-year-old man. He had been experiencing chest pain on and off for several weeks. The most recent episode began about 30 minutes prior to ED arrival. He described 8/10 retrosternal pressure that radiated down his arms. He was tachypneic, but denied shortness of breath and was not hypoxic. Other vital signs were normal. He...
Source: Spontaneous Circulation - September 2, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Secrets Behind the Curtain
“Doc to the radio phone,” went the call over the PA. This is often just medics notifying about a diabetic refusing transport or stopping a futile code, though like most of emergency medicine, it can be anything. Then we heard, “STEMI. Activating prehospital.” EMS had been called to the house of a 54-year-old man. He had been experiencing chest pain on and off for several weeks. The most recent episode began about 30 minutes prior to ED arrival. He described 8/10 retrosternal pressure that radiated down his arms. He was tachypneic, but denied shortness of breath and was not hypoxic. Other vital signs were normal. ...
Source: Spontaneous Circulation - September 2, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Worst Smells In The Hospital? There's a List For That!
I recently asked my thousands of Facebook readers to describe the worst smell in the hospital in their own words.  They did not disappoint.  The hospital setting provides the perfect opportunity to experience a crisis of unimaginable olfactory proportions.  Some people thought the smell of rotting flesh was the most intolerable smell in the hospital.  Other folks said the unmistakeable smell of melena was the worst.  Walking off an elevator onto a floor or unit and experiencing the smells of nasal suicide is a sure fire way to create interesting conversation.  Simply ask anyone who's job is st...
Source: The Happy Hospitalist - October 19, 2013 Category: Internists and Doctors of Medicine Authors: Tamer Mahrous Source Type: blogs

USMLE Questions – Characteristic Disease Findings
The United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) is designed to emphasize knowledge of clinical scenarios and clinical pearls, even on Step I. Listed below are some commonly encountered disease findings and characteristics. Feature Disease 45, X chromosome Turner’s syndrome 5-HIAA increased in urine Carcinoid syndrome Aganglionic rectum Hirschsrpung’s disease Apple-core sign on barium enema Colon cancer Arched back (opisthotonos) Tetanus Argyll-Robertson pupil Syphilis Ash leaf on forehead Tuberous sclerosis Auer rods  Acute myelogenous leukemia Austin Flint murmur Aortic regurgitation...
Source: Inside Surgery - January 18, 2013 Category: Surgeons Authors: Editor Tags: Surgpedia USMLE diseases findings VMA water hammer pulse Source Type: blogs