Case of the Week 698
 This week ' s case is from Dr. Richard Bradbury and his colleague. The following " worms " were removed from the buttocks and left thigh of a 4 year old girl in The Gambia, West Africa. Identification?Posterior spiracles:Close up of the body:Identification? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - October 11, 2022 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

COVID-19 and Fame
Ask anybody on the planet, “What do Tom Hanks, Boris Johnson, and Prince Charles have in common?” and they will instantly shout – “Corona.” Ask these same people, “Who were the three Prime Ministers that died of Coronavirus last month?” Few will respond, “Well…there was Nur Hassan Husein from Somalia, Mahmoud Jabril from Libya and Joachim Yhombi-Opango from Congo – who died (respectively) in London, Cairo, and Paris.” As of May 4, no fewer than eleven movie stars had contracted COVID-19, nine with fatal results. Other victims include retired Commanders of the Turkish and Polish Armies, a well...
Source: GIDEON blog - May 4, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Cases Events VIPatients Source Type: blogs

Despite Federal Return, Capital Punishment is Dying Out
The U.S. federal government recently ordered the death penalty to be reinstated for the first time in sixteen years and has scheduled the execution of five death row inmates. This policy change goes against the widespread trend toward fewer executions.Twenty-one U.S. states, plus the District of Columbia, have totally abolished the death penalty for all crimes. Seven of those states abolished the practice in my lifetime. New Hampshire just officially abolished it in 2019.In many U.S. states where executions are still legal, none have been carried out for years and the law is mainly symbolic. Kansas, for example, has not ex...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - July 29, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Chelsea Follett Source Type: blogs

Carbon Dioxide-Based Cancer Cryoablation Probe for Low-Resource Regions
Undergraduate researchers at John Hopkins University have developed a cryoablation probe for breast cancer, which uses carbon dioxide instead of argon, making it more affordable and accessible for use in low resource regions.   Treatments for women with breast cancer are scarce in poorer places. In fact, survival rates can be as low as 12% for breast cancer patients in places such as The Gambia, compared with 90% in the United States. Treatments that are commonly used in wealthier countries, such as surgery or chemotherapy, are either too expensive or impractical in poorer and more remote regions, where women frequ...
Source: Medgadget - July 15, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Oncology Surgery Source Type: blogs

U.S. Approves Far Fewer Muslim Refugees, Immigrants, & Travelers
ConclusionPresident Trump appears to be fulfilling his campaign promise. The United States is accepting the fewest Muslim refugees in decades, and immigration from the Muslim world has received an unprecedented cut under his administration. On the campaign trail, President Trump assured voters that the Muslim ban would be a “temporary ban.” In the coming months, we will find out how temporary these policies discouraging Muslim immigration turn out to be. (Source: Cato-at-liberty)
Source: Cato-at-liberty - April 23, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: David Bier Source Type: blogs

Being queer in the jungle: The unique challenges of LGBTQ scientists working in the field
The Stonewall Riots occurred on June 28, 1969. It was this summer evening that sparked the Gay Rights Movement. Now, forty-eight years later, the world celebrates Pride Month every June to celebrate, honor, support, and fight for the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) community. The queer community is resilient. No matter what obstacles they encounter, their battle to live, pursue their passions, and contribute to society endures. For many queer people that passion is science.  Queer scientists such as Alan Turing who was crucial in ending World War II, and Sara Josephine Baker who made unprecedented br...
Source: BioMed Central Blog - June 28, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: Ben Ragen Tags: Uncategorized field research LGBTQ Source Type: blogs

Freedom of Thought Under Siege Around the Globe: When You are Not Free to Not Believe
Doug Bandow Much of the world has just celebrated the most sacred Christian holiday, yet persecution of Christians has never been fiercer, especially in the Middle East.  Other faiths also suffer varying degrees of persecution.  Nonbelievers also often are mistreated.  The lack of religious belief is less likely to be punished by communist and former communist regimes.  But such systems penalize almost all independent thought.  Moreover, atheists and other freethinkers are at special risk in theocratic and especially aggressively Muslim states.  The International Humanist and Ethical Union re...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - December 31, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Doug Bandow Source Type: blogs

Igniting Disruptive Change in The Gambia Without Harmful Disruption
Many believe that changes which may be considered “disruptive” to established societal beliefs or practices need to come about through disruptive methods, particularly when we know that those who hold power are often resistant to change. But Mbamata “Fatou” Jawneh, an inspirational participant in Tostan’s non formal education program from The Gambia, is a woman who makes things happen through building bridges rather than burning them. With her natural ability to lead and the knowledge and skills she learned through participating in Tostan’s non formal education program, she has helped to ignite positive change ...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - August 9, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Advocacy Disparities Global Health Patients Policy Women's Health Source Type: blogs

Igniting Disruptive Change in The Gambia Through Cultural Inclusion
Many believe change that is considered “disruptive” must be created through negative methods. Mbamata “Fatou” Jawneh, an inspirational participant in Tostan’s informal education program from The Gambia, is a woman who creates disruption by building bridges rather than burning them. With her natural ability to lead and the knowledge and skills she learned through participating in Tostan, Fatou has helped to ignite positive change in her community and beyond. After attending Tostan’s program, Fatou was elected Coordinator of the Community Management Committee in her village, Munekunda.  In this role she does...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - August 9, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Advocacy Disparities Global Health Patients Policy Women's Health Source Type: blogs

Importation of Rabid Animals
The following chronology of rabies in imported animals is extracted from Gideon www.GideonOnline.com and the Gideon e-book series [1] (primary references available on request) Note that most common scenario has involved rabid dogs imported from Morocco. Year / Imported From / Into (comments) * 1969 to 1970 / Germany and Pakistan / United Kingdom 1972 / Afghanistan / Netherlands 1987 / Mexico / United States (one dog and one cat) 1992 / Algeria / France (subsequently implicated in a case of human rabies) 1997 / Morocco / Switzerland 2001 / Morocco / France 2001 / Nepal / Germany 2002 / Morocco / France 2002 / Azerbaijan / G...
Source: GIDEON blog - June 23, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: Ebooks Epidemiology ProMED Morocco Rabies Source Type: blogs