Looking for Consensus on "Healthy" Foods
By Keith-Thomas Ayoob, ED.D. Get 10 registered dietitian/nutritionists (RDNs) in a room and the chance of us "talking shop" is virtually 100 percent. While there'd be a robust debate about some subjects, we'd all agree that the question we get more than any other from the public is, "Is this healthy?" and various iterations of the same. Many consumers have definite ideas about what's healthy and what's not. So do nutritionists. According to a survey recently conducted by the New York Times that contrasted responses of the public and members of the American Society of Nutritionists, a professional organization, the two gr...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 15, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Can Sleeping Enough Make You Skinny?
It's no secret that not sleeping enough - which is typically considered to be less than seven hours of sleep per night - can cause weight gain, even if you're on a weight oss diet. For example, in research published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, dieters were put on different sleep schedules comprised of adequate sleep (7+ hours per night) and not quite enough sleep (less than 7 hours per night). With adequate sleep, half of the weight the dieters lost was from fat, not muscle, and furthermore, those on a sleep-deprived diet experienced 55% less fat loss! The sleep-deprived group also felt significantly hungrier, ha...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 5, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

3 Types Of Exercise Shown To Help Relieve Menstrual Cramps
By Jennifer Lutz for GalTime.com When it's 'that time of the month' you barely feel like getting out of bed so the thought of working out may seem unimaginable. But doing moderate exercise may be just what the doctor ordered to relieve the aches and pains that come along with your period. So grab your most comfortable and flattering workout attire and do any of these three activities to provide relief, boost your mood, and give you some much-needed energy. RUNNING Researchers agree that aerobic activity may be the best combatant to painful menstrual cramps. Experts at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surg...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 3, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Minute: Do French Fries Cause Cancer?
The U.S.  Department of Agriculture reports that the average American eats 48 pounds of potatoes per year. It's estimated that about half of those spuds are fried. Research shows that potatoes fried at high temperatures may cause cancer in lab rats. Does this mean humans are at risk? Reporter Vivien Willi ams talks to Mayo Clinic nutrition expert Dr. [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - August 1, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Why I Really Gained The 'Freshman 15'
The other day, I met with an 18-year-old woman. Her mom sent her to me, hoping to instill some healthy habits before she heads off to college in the fall. At first, I was reluctant, because I usually work with busy, stressed adults who come to me of their own volition and are self-motivated to make life changes. I was skeptical, but since I too have a daughter heading to college, I clearly understood the issues and decided to try it. My new client was adorable and friendly, and I instantly became enthusiastic about helping her navigate the unchartered and unhealthy waters of college life. We started by discussing the f...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

I Thought I Knew a Lot About Health. Then I Did the Whole30
I love salads, quinoa, and kale. I'm in yoga teacher training, I'm a triathlete, and I enjoy sweating every day. But I also love the sweeter things in life: cookies, booze, cheese, French fries--you name it. In fact, #treatyoself had become my motto about food more often than was healthy. And it wasn't doing my body (or mind) any good. After all, I know a thing or two about health. I work at a website where our mission is to help the world think about health differently. We want everyone to find what's good for them--and we embody that mission at the office. We have fresh groceries delivered twice a week, unlimited sn...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 14, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

I Thought I Knew a Lot About Health. Then I Did the Whole30
I love salads, quinoa, and kale. I'm in yoga teacher training, I'm a triathlete, and I enjoy sweating every day. But I also love the sweeter things in life: cookies, booze, cheese, French fries—you name it. [article-suggestion:5929] In fact, #treatyoself had become my motto about food more often than was healthy. And it wasn't doing my body (or mind) any good.  30 Easy and Delicious Whole30 Breakfast Recipes After all, I know a thing or two about health. I work at a website where our mission is to help the world think about health differently. We want everyone t...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 14, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Can a Computer Game Train Your Brain to Resist Sweets?
That's the question Drexel University researchers hope to answer with one of two new studies launching this month. They have developed a computer game and smartphone app to help people control unhealthy eating habits and ultimately lose weight. The game is designed to improve a person's "inhibitory control," the part of the brain that stops you from giving into unhealthy cravings - even when the smell of French fries is practically begging you to step inside a fast food restaurant. (Source: eHealth News EU)
Source: eHealth News EU - July 1, 2016 Category: Information Technology Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Weight-loss technologies train the brain to resist temptation
Can a computer game train your brain to resist sweets? The game is designed to improve a person's "inhibitory control," the part of the brain that stops you from giving into unhealthy cravings -- even when the smell of French fries is practically begging you to step inside a fast food restaurant. Researchers are testing whether a new smartphone app and computer game can change behaviors. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - June 30, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Can super-sizing start with baby bottles?
Follow me at @drClaire As a country, we have a weight problem. A stunning two-thirds of American adults are overweight or obese, putting them at risk of heart disease, diabetes, cancer and all the other health problems obesity brings. While there are myriad reasons we are getting fatter as a nation, one very real and simple one is that our serving sizes are getting bigger. For example, 20 years ago the average serving of French fries was 2.4 ounces and 210 calories; now it’s 6.9 oz and 610 calories. The average soda was 6.5 ounces and 85 calories; now it’s 20 ounces and 250 calories. Our standard portions of bagels, mu...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - June 21, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Claire McCarthy, MD Tags: Children's Health Healthy Eating Parenting Source Type: news

Revolutionary Way to Be Healthy #20: Aim for 85 Percent
I have learned to listen carefully now for a steely, strident voice that used to seep into my mind without my even realizing it. Sometimes it was a so-called expert telling me to "just say no" to a food or drink I loved. Sometimes it was a "just do it" ad campaign commanding me to exercise even when I didn't feel up to it. But just as often, it was my own internal voice telling me I "didn't need" or "couldn't have" or "didn't deserve" something I wanted -- a waffle, whipped cream, French fries, an extra hour of sleep, whatever. For a while there, I worked hard on complying consistently with those steely-voiced directives...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 6, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Eating More Potatoes, French Fries Linked To High Blood Pressure
BOSTON (CBS) – The next time someone asks “Do you want fries with that?” you might want to consider your heart. A new study by researchers from Brigham and Women’s Hospital and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health found that eating more potatoes and French fries may result in higher blood pressure. People who ate four or more servings of potatoes a week had an 11 percent higher risk of hypertension compared to people who ate less than a serving per month, the study found. Frequent consumption of French fries raised that risk to 17 percent. “Additionally, we found that if a participant replaced one servin...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - May 23, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: nealjriley Tags: Health Local News Syndicated Local Brigham & Women's Hospital Source Type: news

Riders Find Humor as They Near the End of National EMS Memorial Capital-to-Capital Bike Ride
Paramedic Mike Larson keeps a bucket of french fries in his jersey's back pocket for quick energy. Entry 13: Finding Humor Along the Way I could smell bacon at least three blocks away, so I knew we were close. Bacon was a great motivator to begin our first 11 miles of the day on the second-to-last day of the Capital-to-Capital Bike Ride. Usually we have breakfast before we begin our ride, but today we had to earn it. Great psychology when you think about it, despite my initial grumblings about no coffee to elevate the heart rate above one beat per minute. It was worth the wait. Thank you Lewes Fire Department of Delaware f...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - May 20, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Steve Berry Tags: Columns Administration and Leadership Source Type: news

Higher potato consumption associated with increased risk of high blood pressure
Higher intakes of boiled, baked, or mashed potatoes, and French fries is associated with an increased risk of developing high blood pressure (hypertension) in adult women and men. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 17, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news