California Coffee Shops Will Warn Customers About This Possibly Cancer-Causing Chemical. Here ’s What to Know About It
A judge ruled on Thursday that coffee sellers in California should post warnings about a potentially cancer-causing chemical found in the beverage. The chemical, acrylamide, is produced during the coffee bean roasting process, as well as when sugars and amino acids found in other foods are cooked at high temperatures. It’s one of 65 chemicals included in a California law that requires businesses to warn consumers if they may be exposed to substances associated with cancer, birth defects or other reproductive issues. While the decision — which at this point is just a preliminary ruling, and may still be challeng...
Source: TIME: Health - March 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Cancer onetime Source Type: news

Chemicals In Food Wrappers Are Linked to Weight Gain
Chemicals known as perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS)—used frequently in fast-food wrappers and other products for their oil- and water-repellant properties—have been linked to hormone disruption, immune dysfunction, high cholesterol and even cancer. Now, a new study suggests that exposure to the chemicals could make it harder to keep weight off after dieting. The study, published in PLOS Medicine, found that levels of PFAS in the blood were linked to greater weight gain in a group of people who had recently shed pounds, especially among the women. Another finding may hint at why: People with higher blood levels ...
Source: TIME: Health - February 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amanda MacMillan Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime onetime Source Type: news

Environmental Chemicals Found in Non-Stick Pans Are Linked to Weight Gain
Chemicals known as perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS)—used frequently in fast-food wrappers and other products for their oil- and water-repellant properties—have been linked to hormone disruption, immune dysfunction, high cholesterol and even cancer. Now, a new study suggests that exposure to the chemicals could make it harder to keep weight off after dieting. The study, published in PLOS Medicine, found that levels of PFAS in the blood were linked to greater weight gain in a group of people who had recently shed pounds, especially among the women. Another finding may hint at why: People with higher blood levels ...
Source: TIME: Health - February 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amanda MacMillan Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime onetime Source Type: news

Coffee in California May Soon Come with a Cancer Warning
Despite its long list of health benefits, coffee in California may soon come with a consumer warning about cancer. A lawsuit first filed by the Council for Education and Research on Toxics in 2010 seeks to require coffee sellers, including Starbucks, BP, Gloria Jean’s and 7-Eleven, to warn customers about the ingestion of acrylamide, a possibly cancer-causing chemical that’s produced when coffee beans are roasted. Under California’s Proposition 65, businesses are required to notify customers if their products contain any of 65 chemicals, including acrylamide, that are linked with cancer, birth defects or ...
Source: TIME: Health - January 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Cancer Coffee Diet/Nutrition healthytime onetime toxins Source Type: news

Production Diversity, Diet Diversity and Nutrition in Sub -Saharan Africa
Raghav Gaiha is (Honorary) Professorial Research Fellow, Global Development Insitute, University of Manchester, England; & Shantanu Mathur is Lead Advisor, Programme Management Department, International Fund for Agricultural Development, Rome, Italy. The views are personal.By Raghav Gaiha and Shantanu MathurNEW DELHI, Dec 19 2017 (IPS)Lack of diet diversity is viewed as the major cause of micronutrient malnutrition in Sub-Saharan Africa. Imbalanced diets resulting from consumption of mainly high carbohydrate based-diets also contribute to productivity losses and reduced educational attainment and income. Consequently, micr...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - December 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Raghav Gaiha and Shantanu Mathur Tags: Africa Climate Change Development & Aid Economy & Trade Environment Financial Crisis Food & Agriculture Gender Global Governance Green Economy Headlines Health Natural Resources Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Women & Source Type: news

Gene therapy using ‘junk DNA’ could lower risk for heart disease
FINDINGSScientists from UCLA and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute successfully used a gene that suppresses cholesterol levels as part of a treatment to reduce plaque in mice with a disorder called familial hypercholesterolemia. In a preclinical study, researchers found that the gene, LeXis, lowered cholesterol and blockages in the arteries, and the treatment appeared to reduce the build-up of fat in liver cells.BACKGROUND                    Familial hypercholesterolemia is an inherited condition characterized by extremely high levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (commonly referred to as “b...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 28, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

French fries are often BETTER for you than an avocado
Protein-based diets are all the rage -but a large avocado only 3.7g of protein, whereas a portion of chips has even more hunger-supressing protein. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How Bad for You Are Fried Foods?
This story looks at the health effects of French fries and other fried foods. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - June 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What To Eat When Grief Is Eating You
When you’re grieving – particularly after the death of a loved one – you might experience decision fatigue. This happens in response to the number of decisions you’ve been forced to make over a very short period of time, deteriorating the quality of those decisions. As you can imagine, what you eat – the result of small decisions we make throughout each day – is a common victim of decision fatigue. Suddenly, making “good” choices about what you eat seems strenuous and even debilitating. So you opt out of the decision altogether and forgo eating, or make the easiest and most c...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Saturated Fat: Weighed, Measured, And Found Wanting
A stunningly good, extraordinarily comprehensive paper on the health effects of saturated fat in our diets has weighed them in every relevant way, measured them with every pertinent metric, and found them wanting. There are no saturated fatty acids shown to be better than “harmless at best,” and those we consume most often and abundantly in fatty meats, processed meats, fast foods, dairy and processed dairy products are decisively worse than that. They are bad for us. Until rather recently, the idea that pepperoni pizza, ice cream, and bacon were far from good for our health would have evoked nothing beyond a yawn. ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Eating french fries may double the risk of early death
Eating french fries and other forms of fried potatoes two or three times per week could significantly increase the risk of premature death, study finds. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

Fried Potatoes Linked to Early Death Risk
(Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - June 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Fried potatoes linked to higher risk of death
(Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - June 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Health Highlights: June 15, 2017
Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay: Fried Potatoes Linked to Increased Risk of Early Death A new study links eating fried potatoes with an increased risk of early... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - June 15, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Eating fried potatoes linked to higher risk of death, study says
How your spuds are cooked is key to your health. People who eat fried potatoes two or more times a week double their risk of an early death compared to those who avoid them, a recent study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - June 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news