The Art of Prescribing (Or Not)
By HANS DUVEFELT I have learned a few things about prescribing medications during my 42 years as a physician. Some are old lessons, and some are more recent. I thought I’d share some random examples. First: I don’t like to have to use medications, but when they seem necessary, I choose, present and prescribe them with great care. CHOOSING MEDICATIONS Medications are like people. They have personalities. With so many choices for any given diagnosis or symptom, I consider their mechanism of action, possible beneficial additional effects and their risk of unwanted side effects when selecting which one ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - February 1, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Medical Practice Patients Physicians Primary Care Hans Duvefelt Source Type: blogs

Ranolazine – Class Id
Ranolazine – Class Id Ranolazine, originally introduced as an antianginal agent for the treatment of chronic stable angina, is now being recognized as an antiarrhythmic agent as well. It has been included in the class Id of the Modernized Classification of Cardiac Antiarrhythmic Drugs [1]. Class Id is by virtue of its inhibition of late Na+ current (INaL). It has been included among the drugs for treatment of ventricular arrhythmias in the 2017 AHA/ACC/HRS Guideline for Management of Patients With Ventricular Arrhythmias and the Prevention of Sudden Cardiac Death [2]. Ranolazine reduces early after depolarizatio...
Source: Cardiophile MD - October 15, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis Tags: ECG / Electrophysiology Source Type: blogs

Children, teens, and the safety of psychotropic medicines
Medicines prescribed for attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), depression, anxiety, and other mood disorders — known as psychotropic drugs — have largely been studied in adults. This concerns many parents whose children take these drugs regularly. Studies have most often looked at the effectiveness of these medicines in teens and children. Now a recent systematic review of multiple studies done in children and adolescents offers new guidance on safety for commonly used medicines. What did the study look at? The aim of this study was to comprehensively synthesize current evidence on the safety of four...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - August 6, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Hyun Jung Kim, MD Tags: Adolescent health Anxiety and Depression Behavioral Health Children's Health Mental Health Parenting Source Type: blogs

Top 25 Psychiatric Medications for 2018
Psychiatric medications are an important part of treatment for many people with mental disorders, such as depression, bipolar disorder, ADHD, schizophrenia, anxiety, and others. They play an important role in helping to alleviate the most serious symptoms, allowing people to better focus on their lives and on other treatment types, such as psychotherapy. Psychiatric medications are an important part of many people’s treatment plans for obtaining the most effective treatment for a mental health concern or mental illness. It’s good to know what drugs are being prescribed most often for mental disorders in the U.S...
Source: World of Psychology - December 15, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: General Medications Psychiatry psychiatric meds psychiatric prescriptions Source Type: blogs

Discontinuation syndrome and antidepressants
Discontinuation and change are part of life. We all start and stop various activities. Jobs change, relationships change. So, too, may medical treatments, such as antidepressants that help many people navigate depression and anxiety. Planning changes in advance tends to make things easier and smoother. You may start a medication for treatment and discover that it’s not helping your particular medical issue. Or perhaps you’re having side effects. Or maybe your condition has improved, and you no longer need the drug. If so, working with your doctor to change or stop taking an antidepressant slowly may help y...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - April 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christopher Bullock, MD Tags: Anxiety and Depression Mental Health Source Type: blogs

What Do I Do When My Antidepressant Stops Working?
This study examined 103 patients with bipolar 1 disorder who, despite taking a mood stabilizer, experienced frequent relapses. During a 12-month period, the group receiving cognitive therapy had significantly fewer bipolar episodes and reported less mood symptoms on the monthly mood questionnaires. They also had less fluctuation in manic symptoms. It’s normal to panic in the days and weeks your symptoms return; however, as you can see, there are many options to pursue. If the first approach doesn’t work, try another. Persevere until you achieve full remission and feel like yourself again. It will happen. Trust ...
Source: World of Psychology - March 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Therese J. Borchard Tags: Antidepressant Bipolar Depression General Medications Manic Episode Mood Disorder Mood Stabilizer Relapse Source Type: blogs

OCD and Multiple Sclerosis
Obsessive-compulsive disorder is a complicated illness, and the cause, or causes, remain unknown. Research has shown that OCD is seen more frequently than usual in those with various physical disorders, such as muscular dystrophy. An October 2018 study published in Frontiers in Immunology highlights a connection between OCD and another disease — multiple sclerosis. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a debilitating autoimmune disorder, where the body’s immune system goes haywire and attacks healthy cells. It affects over two million people worldwide and has no known cure. Patients with multiple sclerosis and other autoi...
Source: World of Psychology - December 15, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Janet Singer Tags: Health-related OCD Research Compulsions Multiple Sclerosis Obsessions Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Source Type: blogs

Can I Become Addicted To My Depression Medication?
What is depression medication? Depression medication, also known as antidepressants, are prescription medications used to treat moderate to severe depression. When taken under the supervision of a medical professional and according to their prescribed dosage, depression medication can work well to help people manage their symptoms and lead happy, healthy lives. Depression is more than just feeling sad, or needing to be cheered up. Often times, people can become frustrated that nothing is making them feel better, when in reality depression is a chemical imbalance that needs to be treated. Depression symptoms can include: T...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - October 12, 2018 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Addiction Recovery Depression Depression Treatment antidepressants depression disorders depression medication dual diagnosis Source Type: blogs

We Seem To Have News Thick And Fast On Prescription Monitoring.
First we have:DORA the ignorer: Prescription-tracking system failing to monitor all high-risk addictive drugs Diazepam, quetiapine and fluoxetine contributed to ex-Navy submariner's death, says coronerAntony Scholefield2nd October 2018A coroner has stressed the need for real-time script-tracking software to cover addictive schedule 4 drugs such as diazepam and quetiapine, not just opioids.The Tasmanian coroner made the comments after investigating the 2014 death of 44-year-old ex-Navy submariner Michael Allan Steer, who died from a toxic combination of prescription medication.Toxicology analysis revealed the presence of di...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - October 12, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Dr David G More MB PhD Source Type: blogs

Addiction Abuse
Hardly a day goes by without a report in the press about some new addiction. There are warnings about addiction to  coffee. Popular psychology publications talk of “extreme sports addiction. ” Some news reports even alert us to the perils of chocolate addiction. One gets the impression that life is awash in threats of addiction. People tend to equate the word “addiction” with “abuse.” Ironically, “addiction” is a subject of abuse.The American Society of Addiction Medicine  defines addiction as a “chronic disease of brain reward, motivation, memo...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - September 13, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey A. Singer Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, August 27th 2018
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 26, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

The Antidepressant Fluoxetine Restores Some Lost Neuroplasticity in Old Mice
There is a fair amount of evidence in mice for antidepressants to work via increased plasticity in the brain. This means greater generation and integration of new neurons, and more restructuring of synaptic connections between neurons. In mice, plasticity is lost with age, and here researchers show that a commonly used antidepressant can restore some of that loss. It remains an interesting question as to how much of this mouse research does in fact translate to humans; of late the data regarding plasticity of the human brain has been mixed, suggesting that there may be significant differences between humans and mice in thi...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 22, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Might Depression Be Linked to One of These Popular Medications?
If you’re taking beta blockers, certain kinds of anxiety drugs, certain types of painkillers (including ibuprofen), proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) (used to treat acid reflux), ACE inhibitors (used to treat high blood pressure), or anti-convulsant drugs, you may be at greater risk for depression. That’s according to a new, large-scale study published earlier this week in JAMA. However, this was a correlational study, so it can’t say that these medications actually cause depression or not. It may be that people with greater health problems are more likely to take one of these medications and be depressed abo...
Source: World of Psychology - June 15, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: Depression General Medications Psychiatry Research Drugs cause depression popular medications Source Type: blogs

Seroquel, Atypical Antipsychotics for Insomnia, Dementia?
I’m a little dumb-founded whenever I run across a prescribing trend that goes against all of the available empirical evidence for common sense use of a medication. Nowhere is this more evident than with the prescription of atypical antipsychotic medications. It wouldn’t be too far a stretch to suggest that such prescriptions have become like Prozac prescriptions in the 1990s, the latest medication fad. But atypical antipsychotics, like Seroquel (quetiapine fumarate), are far more complex with far more problematic side effects than drugs like Prozac, and should only be prescribed for on-label use. The Washingto...
Source: World of Psychology - April 7, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: Antipsychotic General Medications Policy and Advocacy Adverse Effects Atypical Antipsychotic Bipolar Disorder Insomnia movement disorder Seroquel side effects Weight Gain Source Type: blogs

Top 25 Psychiatric Medications for 2016
Most people understand that the role of psychiatric medications is to help alleviate the symptoms associated with different types of mental disorders, such as depression, bipolar disorder, ADHD, schizophrenia, anxiety, and more. Psychiatric medications are an important part of a comprehensive treatment plan for effectively treating people who have a mental health concern or mental illness. It’s good to know what drugs are being most-often prescribed for mental disorders in the U.S. These are the top 25 psychiatric medications by number of U.S. prescriptions dispensed in 2016, according to QuintilesIMS, a global infor...
Source: World of Psychology - October 12, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: General Medications Psychiatry Treatment medications for mental illness Psychiatric Drugs Psychiatric Medications psychiatric meds top psychiatric medications Source Type: blogs

The truth about long-term antidepressant use
A great piece today in the Guardian by Aida Edemariam. Good to see such a comprehensive piece of reporting in the mainstream media. This what you and I know has happened to many of us, but at the same time GSK continues to deny is a major health crisis because of Seroxat (and other SSRIs). In the UK, as the High Court action moves ever closer to trial, GSK and their expensive legal team still have their collective head in the sand – at least that’s their public stance. I believe that for many years GSK has known about the problems Seroxat causes while you take it, about the terrible problems...
Source: seroxat secrets... - May 6, 2017 Category: Addiction Authors: admin Tags: Anti-depressant David Healy GSK Seroxat SSRI Source Type: blogs

If you have low back pain try these steps first
Low back pain, the scourge of mankind: it is the second leading cause of disability here in the United States, and the fourth worldwide. It’s also one of the top five medical problems for which people see doctors. Almost every day that I see patients, I see someone with back pain. It’s one of the top reasons for lost wages due to missed work, as well as for healthcare dollars spent, hence, a very expensive problem. Looking at two kinds of back pain Let’s talk about the most common forms of back pain: acute (which lasts less than four weeks) and subacute (which lasts four to 12 weeks). Most of these cases ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - April 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Monique Tello, MD, MPH Tags: Back Pain Managing your health care Pain Management Source Type: blogs

Medications that Increase the Risks of Falling
Falls are the leading cause of both fatal and non-fatal injuries for adults 65 and older, and research suggests that those taking four or more medications are at an even greater risk than those who don ’t.ByAlzheimer's Reading RoomWhat ’s the Difference Between Alzheimer’s and DementiaHow to Test Your Memory for Alzheimer's and DementiaHow to Get Answers To Your Questions About Alzheimer's and Dementia“Falls are the leading cause of both fatal and non-fatal injuries for adults 65 and older, and research suggests that those taking four or more medications are at an even greater risk than those who do...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - February 1, 2017 Category: Neurology Tags: alzheimer's care care of dementia patients dementia care health help alzheimer's help with dementia care medications falls Prescription Medications Risks risk of falling senior care Source Type: blogs

Can genetic testing help determine the best medications for you?
The saying “if it seems too good to be true, it likely is” applies to so many things in life. As the director of the Clinical Pharmacogenomics Service at Boston Children’s Hospital, I spend a significant amount of time discussing what pharmacogenomics testing cannot tell us. I am sure you are wondering why I would take a negative approach instead of touting the miracles of pharmacogenomics testing, since after all, that is my job. Well, as with many things, it is complicated. Pharmacogenomics can potentially guide drug choices Pharmacogenomics is the study of gene expression on the ability to metabolize o...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - December 16, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Shannon Manzi, PharmD Tags: Drugs and Supplements Genes Health Managing your health care Source Type: blogs

The Future of Work Part I
Have you ever taken some time to think about what work will look like 5, 10 or even 20 years from now? If you haven’t, it is probably worth the effort because a changing work environment may have dramatic implications for how you are employed in the future. In these two posts, I want to talk about some of the trends I’m seeing and how they may play out in the coming years. Outsourcing Companies are getting better and better at spinning off specific business functions and letting them be handled by others. For example, many businesses can’t justify running payroll in-house. It is cheaper to hire a company...
Source: Productivity501 - September 20, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Mark Shead Tags: Misc Source Type: blogs

Mockingbird #1: Medical Annotations
I hope everyone has been reading Mockingbird, which recently finished its first storyline. It’s a fun comic featuring an enjoyable character, good writing, and great art. Since much of the first story takes place in a SHIELD medical clinic — and since Bobbi keeps reminding us she has a doctorate in biology — I thought the series was ripe for some elucidating medical annotations. Since I don’t want this post to drag on forever, I’m going to break the storyline down into three separate posts. This first one will just deal with the first issue. Mockingbird #1 Chelsea Cain, writer Kate Niemczyk, a...
Source: Polite Dissent - September 12, 2016 Category: Primary Care Authors: Scott Tags: newtag Source Type: blogs

Dementia Care, Which Drugs Increase the Risk of Falling
Medications can increase the risk of falls and falling; and, are a major cause of injuries and death in older adults.By Bob DeMarcoAlzheimer's Reading RoomDuring the entire 8 and a half years, 3,112 days, that I was taking care of my mother, I worried about her falling.Falls can result in hip injuries, head injuries, or something worse.If you loved one is falling, or complaining of "dizziness" check out the list of medications below; and then, consult with your personal care doctor.Problems with Balance, Walking, Falling an Early Sign of DementiaThe drugs older people take can make them more susceptible to fallin...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - September 7, 2016 Category: Neurology Tags: alzheimer's care Alzheimer's Dementia dementia care dementia falls dementia help for caregivers family caregiving help alzheimer's help with dementia care memory care searches related to falling Source Type: blogs

Antidepressants seem to weaken bones
I just read this bit of news: it looks as though antidepressants have a negative impact on bones. A Columbia University study found that people who took Prozac for at least a year were at a higher risk of bone fractures and depletion. So if you are taking “some selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI),” especially any containing fluoxetine, you should definitely have a look at this “New Scientist” article: goo.gl/gYr8hs Note that not all SSRIs have a similar effect on bones… (Source: Margaret's Corner)
Source: Margaret's Corner - September 7, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll Source Type: blogs

Is It Withdrawal Symptoms or a Depression Relapse
Four years ago, a good friend of mine put her 10-year-old son on Prozac (fluoxetine). He had always suffered from anxiety and anger outbursts, but at age 9, his behavior turned violent, and his ruminations were keeping him up at night. My friend and her husband went to a variety of child psychologists, but the cognitive behavioral therapy wasn’t enough. Finally, they got a referral to a psychiatrist, who diagnosed the boy with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). The doctor prescribed both Ritalin (methylphenidate) and Prozac. Th...
Source: World of Psychology - August 30, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Therese J. Borchard Tags: Depression Medications Mental Health and Wellness Personal Bipolar Disorder Mood Disorder Prozac withdrawal Source Type: blogs

A history of SSRIs
This is a re-post from something I wrote in March 2007 – on reflection, perhaps it should be more accurately entitled A History of SSRIs and the Damage they do to Patients. I think there may well be a lot of discussion in the coming months about Seroxat dependency and the terrible withdrawal symptoms that many people have to endure as they try to stop taking Seroxat and so I think that the download – A History of SSRIs  is more relevant today than ever. Looking at my original post, I was remiss as I didn’t credit the author of the download – so ...
Source: seroxat secrets... - October 2, 2015 Category: Addiction Authors: admin Tags: Big Pharma Depression Drug Marketing Glaxo Paxil Seroxat Source Type: blogs

Does Insurance Cover Botox Injections for Migraine Headaches?
Unfortunately no insurance company covers Botox therapy for generic headaches. Many will cover Botox for chronic migraines, which have been unresponsive to standard preventative therapies. In 2011, the FDA approved Botox for treating chronic migraines which have been unresponsive to an adequate trial of preventative medications. Preventative medications do not include the use of any narcotic pain killers. Insurance companies have made it difficult for patients to obtain Botox payment authorization, by putting in place numerous qualification barriers – if they cover Botox at all. Insurance compan...
Source: Sarasota Neurology - March 3, 2015 Category: Neurology Authors: Dan Kassicieh, D.O. Tags: Migraines / Headache Boto for headaches Botox covered by insurance botox for headaches Botox Headaches Insurance Source Type: blogs

MKSAP: 42-year-old man with severe burning and stabbing pain
Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 42-year-old man is evaluated for a 6-day history of severe burning and stabbing pain in both feet that is worse in the toes. The pain is more severe at night, is aggravated when the bed sheets touch his skin, and is partially relieved when he walks or massages his feet. The patient has an 8-year history of poorly controlled type 1 diabetes mellitus and a 2-year history of hypertension. He was hospitalized briefly 2 weeks ago for treatment of pneumonia and diabetic ketoacidosis. His fasting blood glucos...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 25, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Diabetes Endocrinology Neurology Source Type: blogs

The Role Of Black Box Warnings In Safe Prescribing Practices
TweetNote: In addition to Lara Maggs, Aaron Kesselheim also coauthored this post.  In the Health Affairs article, “Era of Faster Drug Approval Has Also Seen Increased Black-Box Warnings and Market Withdrawals,” published in the August issue, Cassie Frank and coauthors compare the number of approved prescription drugs that received black-box warnings or were withdrawn from the market for safety-related reasons prior to the 1992 Prescription Drug User Fee Act (PDUFA) with black-box warnings and safety-related withdrawals in the post-PDUFA era. PDUFA for the first time authorized FDA to collect user fees...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - August 20, 2014 Category: Health Management Authors: Lara Maggs and Aaron Kesselheim Tags: All Categories Bioethics Patient Safety Pharma Policy Public Health Source Type: blogs

Ailments are big business
Back when Prozac (fluoxetine) and Zoloft (sertraline) were new, I remember the mental acrobatics doctors made to justify giving these drugs to anxious patients. The drugs were approved for treating depression, but we knew they often seemed to help anxiety. The reason, we were told, was that some anxious patients were actually depressed, deep down, and we had just failed to recognize their depression. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 8, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Meds Primary care Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Trip Rapid Review worked example - SSRIs and the management of hot flashes
We reported 0.31 but what does that mean?  I favour trying to assign various narratives based on the score, for instance:1>> 0.5 = Intervention is highly likely to be beneficial.0.49>> 0.25 = Intervention is likely to be beneficial.0.24>> -0.24 = Evidence is weak or ambiguous.-0.25>> -0.49 = Intervention is unlikely to be beneficial.-0.5>> -1 =  Intervention is highly unlikely to be beneficial.But these could be modified based on the number of trials.  For instance scores based on multiple trials is likely to be more reliable than those based on a few.Trip Rapid Reviews is proba...
Source: Liberating the literature - October 2, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Source Type: blogs

Keeping the Pounds On: Causes of Unexplained Weight Loss
By Amy Campbell Our society is obsessed with weight, if you haven't noticed. More than two thirds of US adults are overweight or obese, there are more diet books published than we can count, and, of course, we have the privilege of watching shows like The Biggest Loser to help keep us in line. And according to government statistics, more than 85% of people with Type 2 diabetes are overweight. So it stands to reason that much of the focus of managing Type 2 diabetes is based on reaching and staying at a healthy weight. It's important to note that thin people can get diabetes too, and not just Type 1 diabetes. In a 2008 stud...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - February 25, 2013 Category: Diabetes Authors: Amy Campbell Source Type: blogs

Medications that Increase the Risks of Patient Falls
Falls are the leading cause of both fatal and non-fatal injuries for adults 65 and older. Alzheimer's Reading Room “Falls are the leading cause of both fatal and non-fatal injuries for adults 65 and older, and research suggests that those taking four or more medications are at an even greater risk than those who don’t – perhaps two to three times greater,” said Susan Blalock, Ph.D., an associate professor at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy. In 2007, more than 21,700 Americans died as a result of falls and more than 7.9 million were injured by a fall including over 1.8 million older adults who...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - February 14, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Bob DeMarco Source Type: blogs

Withdrawal from Psychiatric Meds Can Be Painful, Lengthy
This article was edited to clarify a few sentences on Feb. 14, 2013.   References Kotzalidis, G.D. et al. (2007). The adult SSRI/SNRI withdrawal syndrome: A clinically heterogeneous entity. Clinical Neuropsychiatry: Journal of Treatment Evaluation, 4, 61-75. Nielsen, M., Hansen, E.H., & Gøtzsche, P.C. (2012). What is the difference between dependence and withdrawal reactions? A comparison of benzodiazepines and selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors. Addiction, 107, 900-908. Therrien, F. & Markowitz, J.S. (1997). Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and withdrawal symptoms: A review of the literatu...
Source: World of Psychology - February 13, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: John M. Grohol, PsyD Tags: Antidepressant Antipsychotic General Medications Policy and Advocacy Psychiatry Research Treatment Caffeine Stimulants Celexa Cymbalta Discontinuation Fluoxetine Hand Experience Hyperactivity Illicit Drugs Lengthy Time Le Source Type: blogs

Drugs for Diabetes Pain
By David Spero Pain researcher Rebecca Sudore, MD, says, "Adults living with Type 2 diabetes are suffering from incredibly high rates of pain, at levels similar to patients living with cancer." Sounds awful. But what can we do about it? Actually, quite a bit. Let's look at medications first. Because chronic pain involves emotions, thoughts, stress, general health, and the entire body, there are at least six different categories of drugs that can help with pain. They include: narcotics, anxiolytics (“tranquilizers"), antidepressants, anti-inflammatories, medicines for seizures, and alternative treatment...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - February 6, 2013 Category: Diabetes Authors: David Spero Source Type: blogs

A Condemnation of Suppression of Medical Research... by Ben Goldacre in the New York Times
Amazingly, this topic now seems to be in the mainstream.The Goldacre Version in the New York Times in 2013 In his op-ed, Ben Goldacre introduced it thus:the entire evidence base for medicine has been undermined by a casual lack of transparency. Sometimes this is through a failure to report concerns raised by doctors and internal analyses, as was the case with Johnson & Johnson. More commonly, it involves the suppression of clinical trial results, especially when they show a drug is no good.He noted that this problems was supposed to be fixed by the registration of clinical trials, and by changes in editorial policies a...
Source: Health Care Renewal - February 2, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Tags: perverse incentives impunity You heard it here first transparency anechoic effect suppression of medical research Source Type: blogs

Brand names make it to the OED!
I first created this post in 2007, and apart from the home page, it has been the most viewed page on my blog (over 6,000 views). So here it is again, with a link to the latest OED update. It’s fascinating to peruse the new words added to the OED. (Here is the latest update, December 2010.) Brand names often enter the language as generic terms, and I’ve listed a few of them below. (I wonder who they have in mind with the word “flip-flopper”. And what on earth is a cotylosaur? I thought “chicklet” meant a little piece of gum, but I was disappointed to discover that it means a small chick o...
Source: ANNE T-V's BLOG - January 18, 2011 Category: Professors and Educators Authors: annietv600 Tags: Friday Fun Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Notes on autism severity and the DSM-V
I was asked briefly to comment onthe notion of " severity " of autism as currently proposed for the DSM-V. Here are some far from complete notes (some from earlier writing or work of mine) I organized in response:Currently, “severity” of autism most often refers to the attempt to quantify the obviousness of autistic traits and abilities. The more obvious these traits and abilities are judged to be, and therefore the more atypical a person is judged to be, the more “severe” autism is considered to be.Being “more severe” (having more obvious autistic traits and abilities, or bein...
Source: The Autism Crisis - June 15, 2009 Category: Child Development Source Type: blogs