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Carly Goff contracts parasite from uncooked fish in Fiji
A teenage girl has broken her silence on the excruciating pain she lived with after contracting a flesh-eating parasite in Fiji that fed off her insides for six years. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Diving for Dakuwaqa: giving Fiji's shark god a helping hand
Dakuwaqa reputedly protects those at sea. But with almost 70% Fiji ’s shark species threatened with extinction, it’s time for humans to return the favour The Fijian shark culture and mythology is one which deeply appeals to me. The shark is revered by many Fijians, and legend has it thatDakuwaqa, the ancient shark god, provides protection for the people when at sea.But the tables are turned, and Dakuwaqa now urgently needs the help of his people: almost 70% of the 75 recorded elasmobranch species inhabiting Fijian waters are considered to be globally threatened with extinction.Continue reading... (Source: Guard...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Lauren Smith Tags: Sharks Marine life Animals Environment Science Wildlife Conservation Source Type: news

He Was Searching For Intersexual Pigs And Ended Up Finding The World's Rarest Dog
Twenty years after beginning his quest to find what’s been called the world’s rarest canine species, James “Mac” McIntyre was vindicated. There on his camera screen were the images he’d been waiting years for. The New Guinea highland wild dog — an animal once feared extinct — was alive and well, his pictures showed. “I squealed like a girl,” the 62-year-old said earlier this month, speaking from his Florida home. “It was emotionally such a tremendous moment. It was justification for all the work I’ve done.” How McIntyre ended up finding the New Guinea ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 24, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Plastic No More … Also in Kenya
Plastic bags are also a major contributor to the 8 million tonnes of plastic dumped in the sea every year. Credit: UNEPBy Baher KamalROME, Apr 4 2017 (IPS)Good news: Kenya has just joined the commitment of other 10 countries to address major plastic pollution by decreeing a ban on the use, manufacture and import of all plastic bags, to take effect in six months. The Kenyan decision comes three weeks after the UN declared “war on plastic” through its new UN Clean Seas initiative, launched on at the Economist World Ocean Summit in Bali (February 22-24, 2017).The initiative’s campaign urges governments to pa...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - April 4, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Baher Kamal Tags: Climate Change Environment Featured Food & Agriculture Global Headlines Health IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Natural Resources Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Scientists Are Racing to Prevent a Total Wipeout of the World ’s Coral Reefs
(SOUTH ARI ATOLL, Maldives) — There were startling colors here just a year ago, a dazzling array of life beneath the waves. Now this Maldivian reef is dead, killed by the stress of rising ocean temperatures. What’s left is a haunting expanse of gray, a scene repeated in reefs across the globe in what has fast become a full-blown ecological catastrophe. The world has lost roughly half its coral reefs in the last 30 years. Scientists are now scrambling to ensure that at least a fraction of these unique ecosystems survives beyond the next three decades. The health of the planet depends on it: Coral reefs support a...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - March 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Elena Becatoros / AP Tags: Uncategorized climate change Conservation Coral Reefs Environment Marine research onetime Source Type: news

Fatal drownings in Fiji - Murray K, Carter P.
Drowning is a newly comprehended public health concern in Fiji. Defined as "the process of experiencing respiratory impairment from submersions or immersion in liquid," drowning has been identified as one of Fiji's 5 leading causes of death for those aged ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 23, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Drowning, Suffocation Source Type: news

Who Invented Agriculture First? It Sure Wasn't Humans
Ants in Fiji farm plants and fertilize them with their poop. And they've been doing this for 3 million years, much longer than humans, who began experimenting with farming about 12,000 years ago. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 25, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Erin Ross Source Type: news

Ants have been farming plants for millions of years, long before people did
Could ants get any cooler?These amazing insects have been known to createrafts andbridges with their bodies and tend to vast fungus gardens. Now, a new study suggests they have also been  farming plants for millions of years.High in the trees of the island nation of Fiji, evolutionary biologist... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - November 22, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Deborah Netburn Source Type: news

Ants and epiphytes: A longstanding relationship
The first farmers on the Fijian archipelago were ants: For millions of years, an ant species on the islands has nurtured epiphytes, which provide them with nesting sites. Moreover, the interaction is vital for the survival of both partners. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - November 22, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Ants behave as mini farmers in Fiji – study
Ants on the Pacific islands observed carefully sowing and fertilising seeds of at least six types of plant as part of a relationship that reaches back 3m yearsAnts found in the Pacific islands of Fiji behave as miniature farmers, carefully sowing and fertilising the seeds of at least six types of plant, a study has said.Ants have previously been observed farming fungi for food, but this is the first study to show the insects cultivating plants, said researchers from the University of Munich who published their findings in the journal Nature Plants.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 22, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Agence France-Presse Tags: Insects Agriculture Fiji Animals Environment Asia Pacific Wildlife World news Science Source Type: news

Ants and epiphytes: A longstanding relationship
(Ludwig-Maximilians-Universit ä t M ü nchen) The first farmers on the Fijian archipelago were ants: For millions of years, an ant species on the islands has nurtured epiphytes, which provide them with nesting sites. Moreover, the interaction is vital for the survival of both partners. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 21, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

[In Depth] First Polynesians launched from East Asia to settle Pacific
It was only 3000 years ago that humans first set foot on Fiji and other isolated islands of the Pacific, having sailed across thousands of kilometers of ocean. Yet the identity of these intrepid seafarers has been lost to time. They left a trail of distinctive red pottery but few other clues, and scientists have confronted two different scenarios: The explorers were either farmers who sailed directly from mainland East Asia to the remote islands, or people who mixed with hunter-gatherers they met along the way in Melanesia, including Papua New Guinea. Now, the first genome-wide study of ancient DNA from prehistoric Polynes...
Source: ScienceNOW - October 6, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Ann Gibbons Tags: Human Evolution Source Type: news

Child sexual abuse in Fiji: authority, risk factors and responses - Whitehead J, Roffee J.
While child sexual abuse is a problem worldwide, the risk factors for the perpetration of child sexual abuse within Fiji are unique in their relation to the traditional and communal nature of Fijian society. In this article, culturally relevant dynamic ris... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 9, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Epidemiology of fatal and hospitalised injuries among youth in Fiji (TRIP 15) - Herman J, Peiris-John R, Wainiqolo I, Kafoa B, Laginikoro P, McCaig E, Ameratunga S.
AIM: To determine the burden and characteristics of fatal and hospitalised injuries among youth in Fiji. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of the Fiji Injury Surveillance in Hospitals database - a prospective population-based trauma ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 31, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Bati as bodily labour: rethinking masculinity and violence in Fiji - Presterudstuen GH, Schieder D.
Violence has been considered a decisive factor throughout much of Fijian history, from pre-modern inter-tribal warfare via participation in the British Military in both world wars to the more recent events of active military intervention in civil matters. ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - July 25, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Jurisprudence, Laws, Legislation, Policies, Rules Source Type: news

Rory McIlroy Pulls Out Of Olympics Over Zika Fears
By Adrian Warner LONDON (Reuters) - Northern Ireland's four-times major winner Rory McIlroy has decided to pull out of the historic golf tournament at the Rio Olympic Games in August because of health fears over the Zika virus. "After speaking with those closest to me, I've come to realize that my health and my family's health comes before anything else," the world number four said in a statement on Wednesday. "Even though the risk of infection from the Zika virus is considered low, it is a risk nonetheless and a risk I am unwilling to take." The International Golf Federation (IGF) said it was disappoin...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why All Women Need To Travel Solo At Least Once In Their Life
I held my first Women's Wellness Retreat at The Warwick in Fiji in January 2015, located on its very own beach on the famous Coral Coast. Fast forward to mid-2016, and I'm preparing for Retreat No.6 at Warwick Ibah in Ubud, Bali, located on sacred royal grounds. These retreats have attracted women aged between 25-69 from all over the world and from different walks of life. Some have joined me twice, some three times, and some even four, and these are women who initially came to me saying: "I would love to join a retreat but I can't do it alone." "I have never done anything like this before but know I need ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Q&A: Crisis and Climate Change Driving Unprecedented Migration
Owing to demographic drivers, countries are going to become more multi-cultural, multi-ethnic and multi-religious, says William Lacy Swing, Director General of the International Organisation for Migration. Credit: Manipadma Jena/IPSBy Manipadma JenaNAIROBI, Kenya, Jun 6 2016 (IPS)Climate change is now adding new layers of complexity to the nexus between migration and the environment.Coastal populations are at particular risk as a global rise in temperature of between 1.1 and 3.1 degrees C would increase the mean sea level by 0.36 to 0.73 meters by 2100, adversely impacting low-lying areas with submergence, flooding, erosio...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - June 6, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Manipadma Jena Tags: Advancing Deserts Armed Conflicts Climate Change Development & Aid Environment Food & Agriculture Global Global Governance Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Migration & Refugees Source Type: news

Bee populations expanded during global warming after the last Ice Age
Population sizes of the Australian carpenter bee have increased dramatically during the global warming following the last Ice Age. This matches previous studies on bees in North America and Fiji, showing that bees from diverse habitats respond strongly to climate change. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 31, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

One month later: Getting critical services to pregnant women after Fiji’s Cyclone Winston
Language English RAKIRAKI, Fiji – One week after Cyclone Winston devastated the island nation of Fiji, Elenoa Adi, age 33, awoke at 4 a.m. to unexpected birth pangs. It was late February, and the baby wasn’t due until April. Her husband had left their home in Rakiraki Town to travel to Baleisere Village, where they both grew up, because the couple had heard that only two or three homes in the village were left standing in Winston’s wake, and they were concerned about their parents’ well-being. (Source: UNFPA News)
Source: UNFPA News - March 21, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: lscott Source Type: news

Lacking basic necessities, Fiji's children 'at risk' after Cyclone Winston – UNICEF
More than a week after a devastating tropical storm ripped through Fiji, some 40 per cent of the islands' children are “at risk,” with many living without safe drinking water, power or a roof over their heads, the United Nations children's agency says. (Source: UN News Centre - Women, Children, Population)
Source: UN News Centre - Women, Children, Population - March 1, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Fiji: UNICEF steps up response as 'full picture' of Cyclone Winston's impact becomes clearer
As the full picture of the worst cyclone ever to hit Fiji becomes more apparent, the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) estimates that up to 120,000 children across the county may be badly affected. (Source: UN News Centre - Women, Children, Population)
Source: UN News Centre - Women, Children, Population - February 26, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Don't Take It Personally When I Tell You 'No.' I'm Using It On Everyone This Year
We live in a culture of Yes. The common self-help wisdom is that we benefit from seizing opportunities, embracing the unknown, soaring headfirst into the possibilities presented to us. And this is all well and good: yes, do try hiking in Fiji! And yes, accept a date with that handsome Italian who works at the bar you frequent, even if it might make things awkward down the line. A well-timed yes can expand our world in beautiful and unexpected ways. But I am writing now to espouse the power of another simple word: no. In fact, 2015 was my year of no (not as inspiring as Shonda Rhimes' Year of Yes but effective nonetheless) ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 25, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Treating Whole Communities for Scabies Feasible, Effective
(MedPage Today) -- Trial in Fiji finds that ivermectin helped control endemic infection (Source: MedPage Today Infectious Disease)
Source: MedPage Today Infectious Disease - December 9, 2015 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Health and safety of women and children in disaster-prone areas ‘must be a priority,’ says UN relief wing
Disaster response specialists, including from the United Nations and other organizations, gathered in Suva, Fiji this week for the annual Pacific Humanitarian Partnership meeting, where the focus has been on high rates of preventable mortality and morbidity among women and children in the disaster-prone region. (Source: UN News Centre - Women, Children, Population)
Source: UN News Centre - Women, Children, Population - October 29, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Meet the President Trying to Save His Island Nation From Climate Change
For millennia, the people of Kiribati have lived off the land, dwelling on their small islands located in the central Pacific Ocean. But over the last several decades, rising sea levels due largely to climate change have slowly eaten away at the country’s 313 square miles. Without action, the country of 102,000 people may disappear altogether over the next few decades. Kiribati President Anote Tong has been advocating for bold action to address climate change for years, making his pleas around the world. Now, Tong says his country’s citizens won’t be able to remain on the physical islands of Kiribati much...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 9, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Justin Worland Tags: Uncategorized climate change Source Type: news

Art Expedition Accidentally Uncovers Glow-In-The-Dark Sea Turtle
This article originally appeared on artnet News. A marine biologist studying coral reefs off the Solomon Islands in the South Pacific made an amazing discovery this week when he noticed a "bright red-and-green spaceship" approaching his way in the pitch dark waters. The glowing underwater body turned out to be a hawksbill sea turtle, a critically endangered species. While it is known that Hawksbill shells change colors depending on water temperature, the biofluorescent capacities of the marine reptile have never been recorded until now. The scientist, David Gruber, a National Geographic Emerging Ex...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - September 30, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Rugby 'cold therapy' may not work
The Welsh Rugby team might want to ditch cryotherapy sessions ahead of their match against Fiji on Thursday, say medical experts who have evaluated this deep freeze treatment for tired muscles. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - September 29, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New Zealand Deports Man Who Would Have Been First Climate Change Refugee
The man who could have been the world's first climate change refugee just got deported from the country where he had been seeking refuge for the past four years. On Thursday, the New Zealand government sent Ioane Teitiota back to his home island nation of Kiribati, which faces engulfment from rising sea levels and continuous storm cycles. The 811-square-kilometer island nation, located almost halfway between Hawaii and Australia in the Pacific Ocean, is home to just over 100,000 people. Teitiota had been seeking asylum in New Zealand since early 2012, after his family -- himself, his wife and three children ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - September 24, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Blueprint for Oceans in Parrotfish Paradise
The tragedy of the commons is thriving in our oceans. A fisherman aiming to maximize profit or provide for his family contributes to over-harvesting. A community looking to cut costs turns a blind eye to wastes entering coastal waters. Billions of people around the world make rational decisions like these every day based on their historical practices and economic interests -- and it's adding up to gigantic shifts in the abundance and diversity of ocean life. Achieving the United Nation's Sustainable Development Goal #14 will require nothing less than restructuring the relationship between humanity and the oceans. It is ri...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - September 21, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Pacific peoples, violence, and the power and control wheel - Rankine J, Percival T, Finau E, Hope LT, Kingi P, Peteru MC, Powell E, Robati-Mani R, Selu E.
This qualitative project was the first to study values and practices about sexual assault among migrant communities from the Cook Islands, Fiji, Niue, Samoa, Tokelau, Tonga, and Tuvalu in New Zealand. It aimed to identify customs, beliefs, and practices am... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - September 4, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Research Methods, Surveillance and Codes, Models Source Type: news

Moral judgments soften with time and distance, UCLA-led study shows
New research suggests that the human mind is disturbingly flexible about moral judgments. An international team led by UCLA anthropology professor Daniel Fessler studied members of seven disparate societies, from rural New Guinea to urban California. They found that, regardless of where they were from, people judged acts like lying, theft and assault to be wrong — but less wrong if those acts happened far away or long ago, or if an authority figure suggested the acts were acceptable. “This troubling finding helps explain why a blind eye is often turned to atrocities that occur abroad or are sanctioned by influe...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 5, 2015 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

How science can help lessen the impact of storm surges on coastal communities – video
Australian scientists have used the example of the Cook Islands to look at how communities can prepare for violent storm surges. Across the South Pacific, tropical storms bring tidal surges that can devastate low-lying coastal communities. But complex modelling by researchers at the University of New South Wales is helping shed light on just how these wave systems workCatastrophic Science is a science and technology series produced by the University of New South Wales Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 22, 2015 Category: Science Authors: Guardian Staff Tags: Science South Pacific Tonga Samoa Fiji Source Type: news

People Are Asking Google If Climate Change Is Real
This year is shaping up to be the hottest on record.  The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration on Monday released temperature data for June, ranking it as the warmest June in history. As temperatures remain high, people are turning to Google to ask about climate change -- what it is, if it's real and how to stop it, among other queries.  (Though Google's data doesn't necessarily reflect people's attitude toward climate change or other environmental issues, there is a consensus in the scientific community that climate change is happening, that humans are largely responsible for ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - July 21, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Iguana captive breeding program in Fiji posts first positive results
A group of endangered iguanas introduced to the Fijian island of Monuriki two months ago have been tracked down and appear to be healthyScientists have welcomed the first results of a captive breeding program aimed at saving a group of critically endangered Fijian crested iguanas, the first such attempt to reintroduce a species in that country.Some of the iguanas that were introduced to the Fijian island of Monuriki two months ago have been tracked down by scientists and appear to be healthy. Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 14, 2015 Category: Science Authors: Monica Tan Tags: Fiji Asia Pacific Animals World news Wildlife Environment Science Source Type: news

High Hopes for High Seas!
When I took on the role of Pacific Ocean Commissioner in December last year, I was humbled and somewhat daunted at the prospect -- being a highlander from Papua New Guinea growing up far from the sea. However, the ocean is central to everything we do. It is our culture, our livelihood, our economy and, for many, the ocean is the mother of all things. The centrality of the ocean in our lives was underscored at our inaugural Pacific Ocean Alliance meeting held in Suva, Fiji, 25-27 May 2015. As Pacific Ocean Commissioner, it is my job to facilitate this multi-stakeholder alliance of national, regional and international partn...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - June 12, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

U.N. Challenges Asia-Pacific to Be World’s First Region to End AIDS Epidemic
HIV-positive women gather in Kathmandu, Nepal for a skills training. Credit: Bhuwan Sharma/IPSBy Thalif DeenUNITED NATIONS, Jun 5 2015 (IPS)The United Nations has expressed confidence that the Asia-Pacific region, with almost five million people living with HIV, is politically committed towards the elimination of the deadly disease AIDS.Michel Sidibé, executive director of UNAIDS, said the Asia-Pacific region is moving the world forward into new frontiers of development. "Our region has broken many barriers and saved countless lives, showing how developing countries can share responsibility, cooperate and take ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - June 5, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Thalif Deen Tags: Asia-Pacific Development & Aid Gender Global Governance Headlines Health Human Rights IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse LGBTQ Population Poverty & SDGs Women's Health HIV/AIDS Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) Uni Source Type: news

Scientists 'amazed' at spread of typhoid 'superbug'
ConclusionThis study has provided information about the spread of a strain of typhoid called H58, which is commonly antibiotic-resistant, by looking at the genetics of samples collected between 1903 and 2013. It has shown that the strain was likely to have arisen in South Asia and then spread to Southeast Asia and Africa. The strain showed different patterns of antibiotic resistance in different regions – likely driven by different patterns in the use of antibiotics. While this study has not estimated the number of cases or deaths worldwide attributable to this strain specifically, there are reported to be 20-30 mill...
Source: NHS News Feed - May 12, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medical practice Source Type: news

Sendai Conference Stresses Importance of Women’s Leadership
Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe says boosting women’s leadership in disaster risk reduction would be a key element of the country’s new programme of international support. Credit: Jamshed Baruah/IPSBy Jamshed Baruah and Katsuhiro AsagiriSENDAI, Japan, Mar 16 2015 (IPS)Women play a critical role in reducing disaster risk and planning and decision-making during and after disasters strike, according to senior United Nations, government and civil society representatives.In fact, efforts at reducing risks can never be fully effective or sustainable if the needs and voices of women are ignored, they agreed.WFP Exe...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - March 16, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Jamshed Baruah and Katsuhiro Asagiri Tags: Active Citizens Aid Asia-Pacific Civil Society Development & Aid Featured Gender Global Global Governance Headlines Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies Population Poverty & MDGs TerraViva United Nations Women & Climate Chan Source Type: news

When Ignorance Is Deadly: Pacific Women Dying From Lack of Breast Cancer Awareness
Local women's NGO, Vois Blong Mere, campaigns for women's rights in Honiara, capital of the Solomon Islands. Credit: Catherine Wilson/IPSBy Catherine WilsonSYDNEY, Jan 28 2015 (IPS)Women now face a better chance of surviving breast cancer in the Solomon Islands, a developing island state in the southwest Pacific Ocean, following the recent acquisition of the country’s first mammogram machine.But just a week ahead of World Cancer Day, celebrated globally on Feb. 4, many say that the benefit of having advanced medical technology, in a country where mortality occurs in 59 percent of women diagnosed with cancer, depends ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - January 28, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Catherine Wilson Tags: Asia-Pacific Civil Society Development & Aid Editors' Choice Education Featured Gender Global Governance Headlines Health Human Rights Population Poverty & MDGs Projects Regional Categories Women's Health Annals of Global H Source Type: news

Retrospective autopsy based study of fatal road traffic accidents in Fiji - Kalougivaki JJVP, Goundar RPS.
Road Traffic Accidents (RTA) account for 1.7% of global mortality and 91% of the world's fatalities on the roads occur in the low-income and middle-income countries [1]. In middle-income and developing countries like Fiji, the costs incurred as a result of... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - January 5, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Distraction, Fatigue, Chronobiology, Vigilance, Workload Source Type: news

Apollo Hospitals and Fiji National University collaborate for healthcare development in Fiji
India-based Apollo Hospitals has signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) with Fiji National University to develop healthcare in Fiji. (Source: Hospital Management)
Source: Hospital Management - November 24, 2014 Category: Hospital Management Source Type: news

Apollo Hospitals ties up with Fiji varsity for healthcare
The MoU was signed by Joint Managing Director of Apollo Group of Hospitals, Sangita Reddy and Vice-Chancellor of Fiji National University in Fiji. (Source: The Economic Times)
Source: The Economic Times - November 20, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mohamed Nasheed: 'There's Nothing More Conservative Than Conserving The Planet'
For Mohamed Nasheed, former president of the Maldives, stopping carbon emissions and adapting to climate change is a necessity. The Maldives sit at an average height of four feet above sea level, making them extremely vulnerable to rising seas. Nasheed, the the first democratically-elected president of the Maldives, called attention to the issue in 2009 by holding the first ever underwater cabinet meeting. Dressed in scuba gear, Nasheed called on world leaders to cut their carbon emissions. He was also the subject of a 2011 documentary about his work on climate change, called "The Island President." Nasheed at t...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 14, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Youth activists help adolescents beat the odds in remote Vanuatu - 03 October 2014
FIJI, South Pacific – When Bobby Shing’s grandmother died in 2001, it was a turning point. The musician from Aneityum, one of the most remote islands of Vanuatu, was just a child at the time, but he had already fallen into substance abuse. The loss of his grandmother made him realize he wanted to do more with his life. Now 23 years old, he runs a UNFPA-supported music programme that reaches out to vulnerable young people. (Source: UNFPA News)
Source: UNFPA News - November 3, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news