A Physician Letter Essay Sample
You're reading A Physician Letter Essay Sample, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. From: Dr. Abu Salim Idris (Consultant Neurologist at KPJ Tawakkal Hospital/ MMC NO 23250 / nsr 124687/) To: Whom it may concern I Am writing regarding the health of my patient, name: MOHAMED YAHYA RASHEED AL JUMA, Passport NO: VP3153200 (OMAN), D.O.B: 01/07/1991 The above-mentioned patient was born on the 1st day of July 1991 in Oman and a student at the KDU University in Malaysia. The student is set to go back for hi...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - July 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: elan peter Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Is lactose intolerance really SIBO?
Evidence is growing demonstrating that intolerance to lactose is really just yet another manifestation of SIBO, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. In a small Australian study, for instance, of 10 elderly people with lactose intolerance, 90% had SIBO (by lactulose H2 breath testing); eradication of SIBO reversed lactose intolerance in all initially SIBO-positive participants. Likewise, in an Italian study, lactose intolerance was associated with SIBO; eradication of SIBO resulted in most people being freed from lactose (as well as fructose and sorbitol) intolerance. It is part of the disruption of the digestive process ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - July 9, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: SIBO a2 dairy grain-free lactose wheat belly Source Type: blogs

H2 Breath Detection: Game-Changer for Gastrointestinal Health
Anyone who remembers the days before finger stick blood glucose meters became available to people with diabetes will recall how awful life was for diabetics. All they had was urine dipsticks which were sloppy, yielded only crude non-quantitative feedback on blood sugars, and gave you a gauge of what blood sugars were in the recent past, not the present. It meant that dosing insulin or diabetes drugs was grotesquely imprecise and accounted for many episodes of hypoglycemic coma and acceleration of diabetic complications. It was not uncommon in those days, for instance, for a type 1 diabetic to be blind and experience kidney...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - June 20, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: SIBO bowel flora Inflammation probiotic undoctored wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Is an opioid really the best medication for my pain?
As physicians, many of our daily practices involve administration of substances that are shrouded in mystery. Certain medications, specifically opioids, have been part of tragic news stories, and have turned young children into orphans, happy spouses into widows and widowers, and once-aspirational youth into memories. The CDC reports that on average, 130 people die each day from an opioid overdose. With such harrowing statistics, why take opioids in the first place? Well, if used appropriately, opioids can significantly improve pain with relatively tolerable side effects. A short-term course of opioids (typically 3 to 7 da...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - June 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Salim Zerriny, MD Tags: Addiction Pain Management Source Type: blogs

Eight years of Wheat Belly successes
I was looking back over the last 8 years since the first Wheat Belly book was released. It’s been 8 years of astounding, truly breathtaking stories of success over weight issues, health, and physical transformations that skeptics even today claim are impossible. It’s been a virtual avalanche of wonderful stories. Although I’ve seen all of them, often more than once, I could not help but be overcome with satisfaction and pride for the many, many spectacular photos and stories people have shared. So I thought it would be fun to re-post a small sample of some of these stories dating back from the start of th...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - June 6, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Success Stories grain-free Inflammation Source Type: blogs

“ What if I just ignore my SIBO? ”
By just engaging in the basic strategies in the Wheat Belly Total Health, Wheat Belly 10-Day Grain Detox, or Undoctored programs, many mild cases of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, SIBO, reverse. These efforts thereby restore your ability to ingest prebiotic fibers without diarrhea, bloating, gas, abdominal discomfort, joint pain, and dark emotional feelings. Many people thereby are relieved of irritable bowel syndrome symptoms, fibromyalgia, or restless leg syndrome, or have greater power in reversing autoimmune conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis. Unfortunately, not everybody enjoys reversal of SIBO with our b...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - May 27, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: SIBO grain-free probiotic undoctored wheat belly Source Type: blogs

‘ At Least You Don ’ t Have … ’ How to Be Supportive of Someone with Chronic Illness
I was speaking with someone recently who has a series of chronic and painful conditions; some of which are noticeable and some ‘invisible’. What is particularly distressful is that people sometimes say to her, “At least you don’t have cancer.” How dismissive is that? I know they are trying to help her feel better about what she does have and perhaps even attempt to minimize the impact, but it is not compassionate or helpful. There are diagnoses such as fibromyalgia, lupus, diabetes, arthritis or neuropathy which some people have to navigate. It might mean taking naps on an as-needed basis, en...
Source: World of Psychology - May 15, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Edie Weinstein, MSW, LSW Tags: Chronic Pain Health-related Inspiration & Hope Personal Arthritis Chronic Illness Diabetes Fibromyalgia Lupus Lyme disease neuropathy peer support Source Type: blogs

Awareness and Social Media Fundamentals for Patient Communities – #HITsm Chat Topic
We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 5/17 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Amanda (@LALupusLady) on the topic of “Awareness and Social Media Fundamentals for Patient Communities”. May is Lupus Awareness Month, Fibromyalgia Awareness Month, Mental Health Awareness Month, Arthritis Awareness […] (Source: EMR and HIPAA)
Source: EMR and HIPAA - May 14, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: John Lynn Tags: #HITsm Communication and Patient Experience Healthcare IT #HITsm Topics Amanda Green Healthcare Social Media LALupusLady Patient Communities Patients Source Type: blogs

Options to Opioids: How to Manage Chronic Pain Without Prescribing Pain-Killers
You're reading Options to Opioids: How to Manage Chronic Pain Without Prescribing Pain-Killers, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. While there is considerable debate as to how much blame doctors should be assigned for the ongoing opioid crisis, there is little doubt they can do something to curtail it -- that instead of prescribing drugs that have been found to be highly addictive they can resort to alternate forms of pain management. Doctors’ prescription of powerful painkillers like OxyContin is frequ...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - May 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: DrStanleyMatthew Tags: health and fitness addiction health and wellness opioids self improvement Source Type: blogs

Sana Health wins the 2019 Brainnovations Pitch Contest
Pleased to announce the Winner of the Brainnovations Pitch Contest held yesterday, during Day 2 of the 2019 SharpBrains Virtual Summit, after a fascinating session with our “Sharp Tank” and a very close vote. Let’s congratulate Richard Hanbury and Sana Health! And thank you very much to the Judges for your great questions and comments and feedback to the Finalists! Winner: Sana Health Summary pitch: Sana is a neuromodulation device for pain, addiction and anxiety. The device uses pulses of light and sound to guide the user into a deep state of relaxation, and increase neuroplasticity. We have completed s...
Source: SharpBrains - May 9, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Alvaro Fernandez Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness Peak Performance Technology Source Type: blogs

Prescription Drugs That Block Weight Loss
A number of drugs prescribed to treat common conditions, such as hypertension, allergies, depression, inflammation, and diabetes, block your ability to lose weight. Several of these drugs actually cause weight gain, and most doctors fail to inform their patients of such side effects. Among the drugs that block weight loss are: Beta-blockers: metoprolol, atenolol, carvedilol, and propranolol  Antidepressants: amitriptyline (Elavil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), doxepin, paroxetine (Paxil), trazodone, and others Steroids: prednisone and hydrocortisone (but not inhaled or nasal steroids for allergies) Antihistamines: diphen...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - May 7, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates blood sugar drugs failed weight loss fatigue weight loss hypertension insulin prescription drugs undoctored wheat belly Wheat Belly Total Health Source Type: blogs

An experimental study of pharmaceutical cannabis in fibromyalgia
This study is one of the growing number of studies beginning to examine the effects of cannabinoids on pain, and offers a tiny window into what might be happening. Note: the study was performed in collaboration with the cannabis producer, and one of the authors is an employee of this company. Although his role was only to comment on the protocol and final version of the paper, it’s worth noting this relationship. The study question In this study, the researchers were looking to understand the analgesic effect of inhaled pharmaceutical-grade cannabis as a plant rather than an extract, using four different variet...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - May 6, 2019 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: BronnieLennoxThompson Tags: Chronic pain Coping strategies News Pain conditions Research cannabis experiment fibromyalgia Source Type: blogs

Finalists named to take part in the Brainnovations Pitch Contest next week
Excited to announce the three groundbreaking startups that will get to pitch their idea and solutions at the Brainnovations Pitch Contest on May 8th, during Day 2 of the 2019 SharpBrains Virtual Summit (May 7–9th). These are the selected Finalists, together with their summary elevator pitch. Please join us in celebrating their work so far and in wishing them all the best at the pitch contest! Finalist: eQuility Elevator pitch: Our vision is to develop digital therapies healing mind and body, leveraging innovation in consumer technology to deliver advanced, non-drug clinical interventions for a wide range of conditio...
Source: SharpBrains - May 3, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Alvaro Fernandez Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness Peak Performance Technology BrainPatch digital therapeutics eQuility neuromodulation neuroplasticity Sana Health Source Type: blogs

Pacing, pacing, pacing …
If there’s one pain management and rehabilitation strategy that keeps me awake at night, it’s pacing. Living with persistent pain, I loathe the idea of pacing because I know everyone “booms and busts” from time to time, and few people like the idea of planning every single aspect of every single day as they come to grips with modifying their daily routines. BUT it’s one of the most popular strategies in textbooks, self-help books, and in treatment so there must be something in it, right? Vexed definitions One of the problems with the whole pacing concept is defining what we mean by it. I...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - April 29, 2019 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: BronnieLennoxThompson Tags: 'Pacing' or Quota Chronic pain Clinical reasoning Coping Skills Coping strategies Occupational therapy Pain conditions Physiotherapy Research Science in practice activity management activity pacing pain management pain rehabilita Source Type: blogs

Podcast: There ’s More to Trauma than PTSD
 Most of us are familiar with post-traumatic stress disorder. PTSD (deservedly) gets a lot of attention, largely focused on soldiers returning from service. But trauma comes in many forms, and most people have experienced it in one form or another. In this episode, learn about the differences between PTSD and other forms of trauma, how to identify it, and what can be done about it.   Subscribe to Our Show! And Remember to Review Us! About Our Guest Robert T. Muller, Ph.D., is the author of the psychotherapy book, “Trauma & the Struggle to Open Up:  From Avoidance to Recovery &...
Source: World of Psychology - April 18, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Show Tags: General PTSD The Psych Central Show Trauma Gabe Howard Vincent M. Wales Source Type: blogs

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) may not be what you thought
At least 50% of people diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome, IBS, actually have small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, SIBO. If SIBO is not addressed directly, it can lead to numerous other health conditions such as fibromyalgia, diverticular disease, even colon cancer. Identify and confirm whether your IBS is really SIBO, then learn how to take action to correct it and be relieved of both IBS symptoms and the long-term consequences of SIBO. The post Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) may not be what you thought appeared first on Dr. William Davis. (Source: Wheat Belly Blog)
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - April 12, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: IBS SIBO Aire autoimmune bowel flora hydrogen breath test Inflammation irritable bowel syndrome microbiota prebiotic probiotic small intestinal bacterial overgrowth undoctored wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Intensive 2-Hour SIBO Workshop
Join us Tuesday evening, March 12th, at 8 pm EST/ 7 pm CST/6 pm MT/5 pm PT for my Undoctored SIBO Workshop: A 2-hour in-depth exploration of SIBO that I shall present via live video broadcast. The cost to attend is $55. An unprecedented number of people now have small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, SIBO, an intestinal condition that has reached epidemic proportions. SIBO causes or worsens numerous health conditions such as fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome, ulcerative colitis, restless leg syndrome, ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease. If you have any of these conditions or have diabetes (typ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - March 5, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates Source Type: blogs

8 Health Risks of Untreated Depression
Medication side-effects can seem unbearable at times: dry mouth, nausea, dizziness, constipation. Certain prescriptions can also increase our risks for developing chronic conditions like thyroid disease and diabetes. Three years ago, I decided that the pills’ side-effects weren’t worth the relief they brought, so I slowly weaned off all my medication. I then plummeted into a severe depression that ended up taking a far greater toll on my health than the nuisance of my drugs. You may be justifiably concerned about how your mood stabilizer and antidepressant are altering your biochemistry, but also consider the g...
Source: World of Psychology - March 5, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Therese J. Borchard Tags: Depression General Medications Antidepressant Cognitive Decline Diabetes Mood Stabilizer Source Type: blogs

Depth Electrodes or Digital Biomarkers? The future of mood monitoring
Stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG) vs.Mindstrong HealthMood Monitoring via Invasive Brain Recordings or Smartphone SwipesWhich Would You Choose?That's not really a fair question. The ultimate goal of invasive recordings is one of direct intervention, by delivering targeted brain stimulation as a treatment. But first you have to establish a firm relationship between neural activity and mood. Well, um, smartphone swipes (the way you interact with your phone) aim to establish a firm relationship between your “digital phenotype” and your mood. And then refer you to an app for a precision intervention. Or to your t...
Source: The Neurocritic - February 19, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: The Neurocritic Source Type: blogs

Got pain? Get better sleep
The cell phone blares out reveille. Your eyes open reluctantly and you realize it’s morning, having only gone to bed four hours earlier because of a late-night party. You creak out of bed to ready yourself for work, arthritic joints hurting much more than usual. A painful day lies ahead even after taking ibuprofen. Does this sound familiar? If it does, you are not alone. Nearly 70% of Americans report getting insufficient sleep on a regular basis, and approximately 20% of Americans suffer from chronic pain. Recently, the intersection between these two conditions has become more apparent. The association between sleep...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - February 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Stuart Quan, MD Tags: Fatigue Pain Management Sleep Source Type: blogs

Ten reasons to NEVER eat gluten-free processed foods
. It saddens me: As popular as the Wheat Belly books and lifestyle have been, there are still millions of people who say things like “Oh, that Wheat Belly thing is just about being gluten-free.” They couldn’t be more wrong and have clearly not read any of the books. Yes, you can be gluten-free and consume foods that naturally have no gluten, gliadin, wheat germ agglutinin, amylopectin A, phytates, and the rest of the toxic components contained in wheat and related grains. You can eat apples, bacon, eggs, and salmon that are naturally gluten-free. You can drink water or tea that is gluten-free. No problems...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - February 1, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates gluten gluten-free grain-free grains wheat belly Source Type: blogs

SIBO Workshop: A 2-hour in-depth exploration of SIBO
Join us Wednesday evening, February 6th, at 8 pm EST/ 7 pm CST/6 pm MT/5 pm PT for my Undoctored SIBO Workshop: A 2-hour in-depth exploration of SIBO that I shall present via live video broadcast. The cost to attend is $55. (I will also be giving a SIBO Workshop for Undoctored Inner Circle members on Tuesday, February 5th at the same time slot.) An unprecedented number of people now have small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, SIBO, an intestinal condition that has reached epidemic proportions. SIBO causes or worsens numerous health conditions such as fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome, ulcerative colitis, and...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - January 31, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates bowel flora Inflammation microbiota probiotic silo small intestinal bacterial overgrowth undoctored Source Type: blogs

Five things I learned about pain this year
Our definitions of pain matter more to researchers and people who like to philosophise about pain than to people experiencing pain. At the same time, definitions do matter because when the IASP definition of pain was first established, the distinction between the neurobiological underpinnings of pain – and the experience – was clear. And this matters because neurobiology is only part of the picture. (Chekka & Benzon, 2018; Cohen, Quintner & van Rysewyk, 2018; Reuter, Sienhold & Sytsma, 2018; Tesarz & Eich, 2017; Williams & Craig, 2016)The idea of “tribes” in pain and pain managem...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - December 23, 2018 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: BronnieLennoxThompson Tags: Pain conditions Professional topics diagnosis Education interprofessional lived experience silos social sociology tribes Source Type: blogs

Tackling Alzheimer ’s Biomarkers Using Machine Learning: Interview with IQuity CEO, Dr. Chase Spurlock
Losing one’s memories, and therefore one’s identity, must be a terrifying experience. With a global estimate of almost 50 million people living with dementia, predicted to rise to more than 130 million by 2050, the burden of Alzheimer’s and dementia are indisputable. While there are still no approved drugs for the treatment of Alzheimer’s, there is an urgency for developing diagnostic tests and the identification of biomarkers that enable the early detection of the disease. In light of this need, diagnostic technology company IQuity (pronounced I-Q-witty) has recently received a grant from the Natio...
Source: Medgadget - November 16, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Mohammad Saleh Tags: Diagnostics Exclusive Genetics Geriatrics Medicine Neurology Source Type: blogs

Obesity, diabetes, SIBO . . . and hate?
Lactobacillus reuteri is an endlessly fascinating microorganism that can inhabit the human intestinal tract. This is the bacterial species we have been cultivating in our L. reuteri yogurt using the two strains, ATCC PTA 6475 and DSM 17938, that boost hypothalamic release of oxytocin and thereby smooths skin wrinkles, accelerates healing, turns off appetite, builds muscle, preserves bone density, and yields other spectacularly beneficial effects. Animals such as pigs, mice, dogs, sheep, cows, and birds have abundant quantities of L. reuteri (of various strains) in their guts, but only 4% of modern humans hav...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - November 3, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates autoimmune lactobacillus probiotic reuteri undoctored Weight Loss wheat belly yogurt Source Type: blogs

Now NOT to have high blood pressure
Patient suffers from hypertension. Woman is measuring blood pressure with monitor. The average American’s lifetime risk for developing high blood pressure is 90%, even using the lax definition of hypertension in clinical studies (that typically don’t label a BP high unless it is 140/90 mmHg or higher, even though we know that, for example, risk for stroke and cardiovascular begin to rise with a systolic, or top, value of only 115 mmHg). Here’s a checklist that, if followed, allow the majority of people with high blood pressure (BP) to reduce both systolic and diastolic values over time and be freed of the...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - October 31, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle gluten grains high blood pressure hypertension undoctored Source Type: blogs

How NOT to have high blood pressure
Patient suffers from hypertension. Woman is measuring blood pressure with monitor. The average American’s lifetime risk for developing high blood pressure is 90%, even using the lax definition of hypertension in clinical studies (that typically don’t label a BP high unless it is 140/90 mmHg or higher, even though we know that, for example, risk for stroke and cardiovascular begin to rise with a systolic, or top, value of only 115 mmHg). Here’s a checklist that, if followed, allow the majority of people with high blood pressure (BP) to reduce both systolic and diastolic values over time and be freed of the...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - October 31, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle gluten grains high blood pressure hypertension undoctored Source Type: blogs

To help restore healthy bowel flora, eat no GMOs
One of the most potentially harmful aspects of genetically-modified crops, or GMOs, are that such crops are often engineered to be resistant to specific herbicides or pesticides. A farmer therefore can spray an herbicide to kill weeds, while the GM crop plant survives. But it means that the plant now has herbicide residues in it. Or it may contain its own built-in pesticide such as Bt toxin, expressed by the plant because the gene for this pest-resistant compound has been spliced into the plant’s genetic code. So GMO crops pose a double-whammy: the crop itself with new genetically-programmed components, especially pr...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - October 29, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates dysbiosis Inflammation prebiotic probiotic sibo small intestinal bacterial overgrowth wheat belly Source Type: blogs

OCD and Physical Pain
I don’t think it comes as a surprise to many that physical pain and mental pain often seem to be connected. I often hear from people with severe obsessive-compulsive disorder who also suffer from debilitating physical pain. And it’s not unusual, once their OCD is treated, for their physical symptoms to subside or even disappear completely. Sometimes the pain those with OCD experience is directly related to compulsions they perform. For example, some people with OCD are compelled to perform extensive rituals while showering, perhaps twisting and turning in particular ways for a specific amount of time. This migh...
Source: World of Psychology - October 26, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Janet Singer Tags: Anxiety and Panic Caregivers OCD Personal Phobia Avoidance Chronic Pain Compulsions Fibromyalgia Obsessions Rituals stiff joints Source Type: blogs

The Wheat Belly Timeline: The First Few Weeks
With all our talk of opiate withdrawal syndromes accompanied by nausea, headache, fatigue, and depression, it can be daunting, even terrifying, to people who face the prospect of tossing all wheat and grains into the trash bin, vowing to never let a Danish, donut, or dish of pasta cross your lips again. So it may help to lay out a timeline of what and when various changes can develop in the Wheat Belly wheat- and grain-free lifestyle. You can expect different symptoms and health conditions to recede at different rates, since they are caused by a variety of different mechanisms. For instance, the direct gastrointestinal tox...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - October 26, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle acid reflux detoxification grains IBS Inflammation joint pain opiates withdrawal Source Type: blogs

The Remarkable Effects of Yoga in Restoring Healthy Sleep and Better Quality of Life
Conclusion Yoga is indeed helpful in many aspects; its benefits are so rewarding that it seems a one-stop solution for most of our physical, mental, emotional and spiritual challenges. Insomnia is one such aspect that is ruining many people’s lives. Yoga has compelling promises in this regard as well.You've read The Remarkable Effects of Yoga in Restoring Healthy Sleep and Better Quality of Life, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you've enjoyed this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. (Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement)
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - October 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: smithwillas Tags: health and fitness Source Type: blogs

Amanda ’ s spectacular Wheat Belly success
Amanda began the process overweight, depressed, struggling with energy, muscle and joint pains, pre-diabetic, hypertensive, and with polycystic ovary syndrome, reliant on numerous medications even in her 20s and early 30s. As you can see now, after starting with the Wheat Belly 10-Day Grain Detox, she is now slender and free of ALL her health problems and off ALL her medications. “The pic on the left is me in my 20’s, 27 to be exact. This was before I ever started my journey. “That smile was masking physical and emotional pain, suicidal ideation, PCOS, depression, hypothyroidism, ADD symptoms, fibromyalg...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - October 23, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates blood pressure diabetes fibromyalgia grain-free grains hypertension Inflammation joint pain polycystic ovary pre-diabetes pros undoctored Weight Loss wheat belly Source Type: blogs

What happened to the grasshoppers?
When I was a kid, grasshoppers were everywhere. I walked through a field every day to get to school and grasshoppers were everywhere, jumping back and forth across my path, frequently banging off my legs. At night in summer, the backyard was filled with fireflies that we’d chase and capture in jars to watch up close. And there were butterflies of many colors and varieties everywhere, flitting from flower to flower. Today, I don’t see any grasshoppers. In fact, I haven’t seen one in over 40 years. I saw one—just one—firefly this past summer in my backyard. And I can count the number of butterie...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - October 22, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Agribusiness bowel flora Inflammation microbiota prebiotic probiotic wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Unexpected Lessons Learned From the Wheat Belly Lifestyle
In the seven years since the original Wheat Belly book hit bookstores and turned the nutritional world topsy-turvy and millions of people have engaged in a grain-free lifestyle, many unique lessons have been learned. Even though I had engaged the practices of this lifestyle for a number of years and in thousands of people before I broadcast these ideas through books, expanding the audience to many more people yielded feedback on an enormous scale, new lessons that even surprised me. Among the new lessons learned along the way: Plantar fasciitis—I did not expect to have so many people report that this painful conditi...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - October 17, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates bowel flora gluten gluten-free grain-free grains Inflammation Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

Encouraging self-compassion may help people with chronic pain live more active, happier lives
This study suggests mindfulness (which was not linked with greater activity) may also be useful in decreasing depression, but by other means, possibly through creating distance from unhelpful thoughts that may arise around pain or the experience of disability.  As cross-sectional research, we can’t draw clear causal conclusions from the new findings, but they do help us refine our understanding of which mechanisms are more likely to increase pain acceptance. The findings may also help pain management professionals focus their methods, providing people with the ground from which they can build and sustain a life ...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - October 17, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Health Source Type: blogs

Encouraging self-compassion may help people with chronic pain lead more active, happier lives
This study suggests mindfulness (which was not linked with greater activity) may also be useful in decreasing depression, but by other means, possibly through creating distance from unhelpful thoughts that may arise around pain or the experience of disability.  As cross-sectional research, we can’t draw clear causal conclusions from the new findings, but they do help us refine our understanding of which mechanisms are more likely to increase pain acceptance. The findings may also help pain management professionals focus their methods, providing people with the ground from which they can build and sustain a life ...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - October 17, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Health Source Type: blogs

On “ us ” and “ them ” : what if we ’ re one of “ them ” ?
Over the past few years I’ve been pondering the presumed gap between people living with pain and the people who “treat” or work with them.  Most of my readers will know that I live with widespread pain (aka fibromyalgia) or pain that is present in many parts of my body, and the associated other symptoms like DOMS that last for weeks not a day or two, and increased sensitivity to heat, cold, pressure, chilli, sound and so on. I first “came out” with my pain about 15 years ago: that is, I first disclosed to people I worked with that I had this weird ongoing pain – and finally joined...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - October 7, 2018 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: BronnieLennoxThompson Tags: Chronic pain Professional topics Research Therapeutic approaches inclusion inequality Source Type: blogs

Does your poop float?
There are a number of explanations for poops that float, some benign, some not. If you talk to your doctor or explore online discussions about this, you will encounter talk of malabsorption (i.e., inadequate digestive breakdown of various components of diet), pancreatic insufficiency (e.g., inadequate production of pancreatic digestive enzymes due to prior pancreatitis), lactose or fructose intolerance, or excessive consumption of sugars and/or carbohydrates that increase gas content of stools. But an extremely common and important cause is rarely mentioned: small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, or SIBO. Recall that SIBO ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - September 25, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates autoimmune bowel flora dysbiosis fibromyalgia grain-free malabsorption psoriasis sibo small intestinal bacterial undoctored Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: More Mayo, Please …
By David Tuller, DrPH Two years ago, the Mayo Clinic referred Lisa Alioto, a patient diagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome, to a three-day rehabilitation program–a mini-version of a multi-week program designed for those with a grab-bag of chronic pain and related conditions. These conditions, as listed on the Mayo website, include fibromyalgia, chronic back pain, […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - August 20, 2018 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Do you get brain fog with probiotics?
We may now have an explanation for the people who experience brain fog with probiotic use. We already know that intolerance to prebiotic fibers within the first 60 minutes of ingestion have small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, SIBO. If you experience excessive gas, bloating, abdominal discomfort, or diarrhea within the first hour of consuming, say, inulin, a raw white potato, or legumes, it is virtually certain that you have SIBO that must be addressed if you desire full recovery of health. Recall that uncorrected SIBO can account for fibromyalgia, IBS, restless leg syndrome, psoriasis, and marked long-term potential for...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - August 4, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates Source Type: blogs

Dirty mouth
While watching the morning news (you know, the tidbits of news aired between direct-to-consumer drug ads), a commercial came on claiming that a new mouthwash kills 99.9% of all bacteria in the mouth, good-looking young people gazing at each other with inviting smiles. Now why would you do that? Why would you wipe clean a bodily orifice that is meant to be teeming with microorganisms? The human gastrointestinal tract, as well as the airway, vagina, skin, and other body parts, are all meant to be colonized with microorganisms. It represents an important symbiotic relationship: we support their health and they support ours. ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - July 18, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates bowel flora cavities decay dental grain-free Inflammation teeth Source Type: blogs

The fecalization of America
I’ve been lately discussing the issue of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, or SIBO, a situation in which bowel microorganisms (especially of the undesirable Enterobacteriaceae variety such as E. coli and Shigella) ascend up from the colon and colonize the ileum, jejunum, duodenum, and stomach. This has numerous health implications that are only beginning to be appreciated: irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), fibromyalgia, psoriasis and other skin rashes, restless leg syndrome, diverticular disease, heightened body-wide inflammation, increased risk for colon cancer—SIBO is either synonymous with these condition...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - July 10, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates bowel flora dysbiosis Inflammation microbiota prebiotic probiotic sibo small intestinal bacterial overgrowth undoctored wheat belly Source Type: blogs

I Started a New Blog
I started this blog when I was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2007. Blogging really helped me cope with my cancer and its treatment.However my life has moved on. I have blogged about it in the past - that my life was changing - breast cancer is no longer the main focus in my life.My chronic ailments have replaced that focus. While breast cancer never really goes away it turns more to be chronic illness than a terminal one, unless metastases appear. So I have a total of four chronic illnesses - breast cancer, thyroid cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, and fibromyalgia. I also have chronic physical ailments - bone spur, desiccat...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - June 25, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: ailments blogging breast cancer chronic conditions Source Type: blogs

Assessing problems with sleep & persistent pain
Problems with sleep affect most of us from time to time. We know we might find it difficult to get off to sleep because of a busy mind, a different bedroom, changes to our schedule – but for most of us, sleep returns to our normal fairly quickly. For some of us, though, sleep problems continue for weeks, months or even years. And for people living with persistent pain, sleep can be one of the most difficult things to deal with, yet it’s also one of the most common (McCracken & Iverson, 2002). Studies of sleep problems in people with fibromyalgia show abnormal sleep continuity as well as changes in sleep arc...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - June 11, 2018 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: BronnieLennoxThompson Tags: Chronic pain Clinical reasoning Coping Skills Coping strategies Health Pain conditions Therapeutic approaches acceptance Assessment biopsychosocial science treatment Source Type: blogs

Thriving with an Invisible Chronic Illness
You have a chronic illness that is debilitating and requires meticulous management. Which is hard enough. But you also have an invisible illness—like fibromyalgia, diabetes, Lyme disease, IBS, or something very rare. On the outside, on most days, you look fine, even perfectly healthy. But on the inside, you’re struggling with unbearable migraines, knock-you-off-your-feet fatigue, dangerous digestive issues, severe pain and much more. Because people don’t see these symptoms, they misunderstand what’s going on, which leads you to feel judged and lonely. And these people might include everyone from med...
Source: World of Psychology - May 13, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Disorders General Health-related Inspiration & Hope Mental Health and Wellness Self-Help Chronic Illness Chronic Pain Coping Skills Resilience Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: May 12th-International ME Awareness Day
By David Tuller, DrPH Saturday, May 12th, is International ME Awareness Day. (It’s also International Fibromyalgia Awareness Day, and the same for Gulf War Illness and Multiple Chemical Sensitivity. But here we’re mostly focused on the first.) This day in the calendar was adopted years ago as an opportunity to promote the visibility of neuro-immune […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - May 11, 2018 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

When You ’re a Highly Sensitive Mom
When you’re highly sensitive, being a mom can sharpen your sensitivities. After all, kids are loud and boisterous and messy. Which can be uncomfortable and overwhelming, making the desire to retreat somewhere quiet even more acute and urgent. But, of course, retreating isn’t exactly possible when you’re a parent. In general, when you’ve got kids, there’s very little alone time. And, of course, alone time is vital for highly sensitive people (HSPs) in order to recover and recharge. We are already overstimulated. You also constantly feel like you’re short on time, and there’s always ...
Source: World of Psychology - May 4, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Anxiety and Panic General Habits Happiness Mental Health and Wellness Parenting Self-Help Stress Women's Issues Highly Sensitive Person Motherhood Source Type: blogs

Aerobic exercise or tai chi for fibromyalgia – which is better?
Follow me on Twitter @RobShmerling Fibromyalgia is a common condition that causes chronic body-wide pain and affects millions of people. The cause is unknown, and medications approved to treat it often aren’t effective, cause side effects, or both. To say we need better treatments for fibromyalgia is an understatement. Non-medication treatment of fibromyalgia — especially exercise — is an essential part of treatment. But the last thing people with this condition want to do is exercise! Their pain and fatigue, so typical of this disease, make physical activity more wishful thinking than reality for most fi...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - April 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Exercise and Fitness Health Pain Management Source Type: blogs

Aerobic exercise or tai chi for fibromyalgia — which is better?
Follow me on Twitter @RobShmerling Fibromyalgia is a common condition that causes chronic body-wide pain and affects millions of people. The cause is unknown, and medications approved to treat it often aren’t effective, cause side effects, or both. To say we need better treatments for fibromyalgia is an understatement. Non-medication treatment of fibromyalgia — especially exercise — is an essential part of treatment. But the last thing people with this condition want to do is exercise! Their pain and fatigue, so typical of this disease, make physical activity more wishful thinking than reality for most fi...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - April 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Exercise and Fitness Health Pain Management Source Type: blogs

Neurostimulation Enhanced by Digital Health: Interview with CEO of NeuroMetrix
Neurostimulation has the capacity to stop pain signals from traveling up to the brain, but to mask the pain effectively and for long periods of time clinicians have turned to implants. That is because conventional TENS (Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation) devices don’t have the strength and focus to comfortably quell pain in long intervals. NeuroMetrix, a publicly traded company based in Waltham, MA, has developed technologies that overcome many of the limitations of TENS devices, allowing the firm’s main product, the Quell Wearable Pain Relief device, which we tested out a few years ago, to fight pain...
Source: Medgadget - April 4, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Exclusive Medicine Orthopedic Surgery Pain Management Source Type: blogs