Skin tag removal: Optional but effective
Skin tags are common, benign skin growths that hang from the surface of the skin on a thin piece of tissue called a stalk. They are made up of many components, including fat, collagen fibers, and sometimes nerve cells and small blood vessels. It’s possible that these collagen fibers and blood vessels become wrapped up inside a layer of skin, leading to the formation of a skin tag. The medical term for a skin tag is acrochordon, and they can also be referred to as soft fibromas or fibroepithelial polyps. Skin tags are frequently found in areas of friction on the skin, such as the neck, underarms, under the breast...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - March 23, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kristina Liu, MD, MHS Tags: Cosmetic surgery Health Skin and Hair Care Source Type: blogs

Eight years of Wheat Belly successes
I was looking back over the last 8 years since the first Wheat Belly book was released. It’s been 8 years of astounding, truly breathtaking stories of success over weight issues, health, and physical transformations that skeptics even today claim are impossible. It’s been a virtual avalanche of wonderful stories. Although I’ve seen all of them, often more than once, I could not help but be overcome with satisfaction and pride for the many, many spectacular photos and stories people have shared. So I thought it would be fun to re-post a small sample of some of these stories dating back from the start of th...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - June 6, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Success Stories grain-free Inflammation Source Type: blogs

Abdominal wall mass –MRI Approach
50 yr old lady presents for CEMRI with abdominal wall mass in USG with no history of trauma / fever / surgery.CEMRI shows – Large intense& heterogeneously enhancing altered signal intensity space occupying lesion involving left anterior parietes of abdominal wall extending from supraumbilical to pelvic region with areas of necrosis/ restricted diffusion /predominantly edematous signal components /rectus abdominis not separately identified / properitoneal fat stranding with no intraperitoneal extension / across midline /no definite skin ulceration /regional lymphadenopathy / air /MR demonstrable calcification...
Source: Sumer's Radiology Site - February 24, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Sumer Sethi Source Type: blogs

Neurogenic tumor: Teaching Points
Discussion –Peripheral nerve sheath tumors consist of neurofibromas and schwannomas in the benign category& malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) in malignant category.Imaging features and signs that help to identify and characterize a nerve sheath tumor are, distribution of the tumor along a major nerve, an entering or exiting nerve sign, target sign, a fascicular sign and a split-fat sign.-         Distribution of the lesion along the course of the nerve is most important feature. Benign lesions may be located along the cutaneous or deep nerves, however, th...
Source: Sumer's Radiology Site - February 18, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Sumer Sethi Source Type: blogs

Tuberous Sclerosis : Case Report
DiscussionTuberous sclerosis is an autosomal dominant neurocutaneous syndrome characterized by various abnormalities, including multisystemic hamartomas. Also known as Bourneville disease, named after D ésiré-Magloire Bourneville, the French physician who discovered the potato like appearance of cortical lesions in the brains of patients with this condition.Tuberous sclerosis is the second most common phakomatosis behind neurofibromatosis type 1. It has a prevalence estimated to be 1 in 6000. App roximately one third of cases of tuberous sclerosis are familial the other two thirds of cases are sporadic and du...
Source: Sumer's Radiology Site - July 12, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Sumer Sethi Source Type: blogs

Five Radiology Artificial Intelligence Companies That Somebody Should Build and Invest In
By HUGH HARVEY I’ve previously written comprehensively on where to invest in Radiology AI, and how to beat the hype curve precipice the field is entering. For those that haven’t read my previous blog, my one line summary is essentially this: “Choose companies with a narrow focus on clinically valid use cases with large data sets, who are engaged with regulations and haven’t over-hyped themselves …” The problem is… hardly any investment opportunities in Radiology AI like this actually exist, especially in the UK. I thought it’s about time I wrote down my ideas for what I...
Source: The Health Care Blog - December 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Investing Radiology Source Type: blogs

Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 205
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Just when you thought your brain could unwind on a Friday, you realise that it would rather be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF…introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 205. Question 1 Meigs’ Syndrome resolves after removal of the tumour. What is the classic triad of Meigs’ Syndrome? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer expand(document.getElementById('ddet771338363'));expand(document.getElementById('ddetli...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - September 15, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neil Long Tags: Frivolous Friday Five allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis Argyll Robertson aspergilloma aspergillus Calabar extrinsic allergic alveolitis invasive aspergillosis kartagener's syndrome liver Loa loa worms Meigs syndrome ocular oa Source Type: blogs

Healthcare Update Satellite — 12-16-2014
Answering the important questions … why does the flu vaccine suck this year? Keep a lookout for next month’s issue of EP Monthly which will tell you everything you need to know about influenza diagnosis and treatment. Of course, if you had read the backboard article in EP Monthly’s November issue, you’d already be doing this … Florida fire department abandons use of backboards for most trauma patients. 4 year old boy develops carotid artery dissection and left sided hemiparesis after riding a roller coaster. Fortunately, he had made significant recovery by six months. How scary is that, thou...
Source: WhiteCoat's Call Room - December 17, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: WhiteCoat Tags: Healthcare Update Source Type: blogs

Relationship between Hamartoma and Cancer
In June, 2014, my book, entitled Rare Diseases and Orphan Drugs: Keys to Understanding and Treating the Common Diseases was published by Elsevier. The book builds the argument that our best chance of curing the common diseases will come from studying and curing the rare diseases. The book has an extensive glossary, that explains the meaning and relevance of medical terms appearing throughout the chapters. The glossary can be read as a stand-along document. Here is an example of one term, "hamartoma", excerpted from the glossary.Hamartoma - Hamartomas are benign tumors that occupy a peculiar zone lying between neo...
Source: Specified Life - July 15, 2014 Category: Pathologists Tags: cancer types carcinogenesis common cancers disease genes genetic disease hyperplasia orphan disease orphan drugs rare cancers rare disease tissue overgrowth tumor biology tumor types Source Type: blogs

Lose the wheat . . . climb a mountain
Lisa tells a moving story of a life transformed by wheat elimination: About 3 years ago I was struggling with crazy inflammation: moderate at times, but also spiking and leaving me barely able to walk. I was turning 40 and felt 90. Doctors diagnosed me with “fibromayalgia” and “Auto Immune Disorder–Etiology Unknown” and gave me pain pills and steroids, which I tried but the side effects were terrible. I knew they weren’t the answer, but I had no idea how to figure out what was wrong. I basically suffered for years until I found your book. Within a week–days, really–of stayi...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - October 3, 2013 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat-elimination success stories Source Type: blogs

Tendoachilles tear-MRI
57 year old male,  with history of slipping on the staircase, shows on MRI an apparent tendoachilles discontinuity and disruption of approximately 3 cms in the critical zone of vascularity from the calcaneum (4 cms) with paratendon edema with no retraction of the ends, suggestive of partial tear.  Case by Dr MGK Murthy, Mr Gupta and Mr Venkat Teaching points : Lateral head of the gastrocnemius from the lateral femoral condyle joints the medial head fibres (from medial femoral condyle) at the junction of proximal and mid calf with soleus fibres joining them 3 to 4 cms down to form tendoachilles....
Source: Sumer's Radiology Site - September 6, 2013 Category: Radiologists Authors: Sumer Sethi Source Type: blogs

Drugs to treat fibromyalgia just as likely to harm as help, review finds - ScienceDaily
Among fibromyalgia patients taking either of two commonly prescribed drugs to reduce pain, 22 percent report substantial improvement while 21 percent had to quit the regimen due to unpleasant side effects, according to a new review in The Cochrane Library. People with fibromyalgia suffer from chronic widespread pain, sleep problems and fatigue. The illness affects more than 5 million Americans, 80 percent of whom are women. The cause of fibromyalgia is unknown and currently there is no cure. Using a Quality of Life (QOL) scale for fibromyalgia, the studies reviewed reported QOL ratings lower than 15 on a scale of 0 to 100...
Source: Psychology of Pain - February 27, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs