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Nerve implant 'restores consciousness' to man in vegetative state
Stimulation of the vagus nerve allows patient who has been in a vegetative state for 15 years to track objects with his eyes and respond to simple requestsA 35-year-old man who had been in a vegetative state for 15 years has shown signs of consciousness after receiving a pioneering therapy involving nerve stimulation.The treatment challenges a widely-accepted view that there is no prospect of a patient recovering consciousness if they have been in a vegetative state for longer than 12 months.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 25, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Neuroscience Medical research Source Type: news

FDA clears Second Sight IDE trial of next-gen Orion cortical visual prosthesis
Second Sight Medical (NSDQ:EYES) said today it won FDA investigational device exemption to initiate a feasibility clinical study of its Orion cortical visual prosthesis system. The conditional approval gives the Sylmar, Calif.-based company clearance to enroll up to 5 patients at 2 US sites, but requires that the company conduct additional device testing and “address outstanding questions” within 45 days, it said. “This is an exciting milestone for the company given the potential of Orion to provide useful vision to millions of blind individuals worldwide who have no other option today. We are deligh...
Source: Mass Device - August 28, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Clinical Trials Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Optical/Ophthalmic Prosthetics second-sight-medical Source Type: news

Abbott launches trial of transcatheter tricuspid repair device, eyes CE Mark
Abbott (NYSE:ABT) said today it enrolled the 1st patient in a clinical trial of a minimally invasive, clip-based transcatheter valve repair system for treating patients with severe tricuspid regurgitation, looking to eventually support CE Mark approval in the European Union. The 1st patient in the trial was enrolled at the Abbott Northwestern Hospital by Dr. Paul Sorajja of the Minneapolis Heart Institute, the Abbot Park, Ill.-based company said. The transcatheter tricuspid valve repair system is built off of technology which has been tested with the company’s MitraClip system, designed to treat mitral valv...
Source: Mass Device - August 9, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Cardiac Implants Cardiovascular Clinical Trials Replacement Heart Valves Abbott Source Type: news

Simulations signal early success for fractal-based retinal implants
(University of Oregon) Computer simulations of electrical charges sent to retinal implants based on fractal geometry have University of Oregon researchers moving forward with their eyes focused on biological testing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 27, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Second Sight Medical enters Russian market
Second Sight Medical (NSDQ:EYES) said today it entered the Russian market, with the 1st patient treated with its Argus II Retinal Prosthesis System in Moscow. The Argus II induces visual perception in blind patients with retinitis pigmentosa by stimulating of the retina’s remaining cells with electrical pulses, which allows for the perception of light patterns to the brain, the Sylmar, Calif.-based company said. The 1st implant was performed at the Federal State Institution & Clinical Research Center of the Federal Medico-Biological Agency at the end of June 2017 by a team of surgeons, with Dr. Paulo Stanga ...
Source: Mass Device - July 26, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Optical/Ophthalmic second-sight-medical Source Type: news

Researchers use magnetic implants to treat 'dancing eyes'
Scientists are using magnetic implants inserted behind the eye to treat nystagmus, a condition causing involuntary eye movements, or dancing eyes. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - June 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Magnets used to control flickering eyes
A case study has shown how magnetic implants in the eye can successfully control the movement of the eye. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - June 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

7 medtech stories we missed this week: June 23, 2017
[Image from unsplash.com]From Guardant suing Foundation Medicine to Interson receiving 510(k) clearance for ultrasound probes, here are 7 medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. Guardant levels false advertising suit against Foundation Medicine Guardant Health announced in a June 22 press release that it has filed a lawsuit against Foundation Medicine for false advertising and unfair competition. Guardant Health is claiming that Foundation Medicine’s advertising causes harm to Guardant Health and its patients because it misleads oncologists about the sensitivity and accuracy of...
Source: Mass Device - June 23, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: 510(k) Business/Financial News Clinical Trials Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Implants Neurological Regulatory/Compliance Ultrasound EndoStim Foundation Medicine Inc. Guardant Health Interson Lee's Pharmaceutical Meditech Med Source Type: news

Model With Rare Genetic Disorder Is A Brilliant Example Of Inclusion
This world is a diverse one, so it’s refreshing when the fashion industry reflects that reality. And Seattle-based model Melanie Gaydos is hoping to add to that effort. Gaydos, 28, was born with ectodermal dysplasia, a genetic disorder that can interfere with the proper growth of the hair, nails, teeth, skin and glands. Her involvement in the fashion community is helping people like her to see a place for them in the highly stylized world of modeling. A post shared by Melanie Gaydos (@melaniegaydos) on May 17, 2017 at 5:12pm PDT Fewer than 200,000 people in the United States experience the rare condition,&...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

2 Massachusetts Women, Thousands Nationwide Say Breast Implants Made Them Sick
BOSTON (CBS) – Just a few months ago, the idea of lacing up her sneakers and going out for a run was impossible for Meghan Sullivan. “It got to a point where I couldn’t get out of bed anymore. I was in that much pain,” she said. The single mother from Hingham says she broke out into a terrible rash, her face was swollen, she had joint pain and barely had the energy to take care of her 7-year-old son. “It was hard. It was emotional. It was scary for me. I couldn’t live normally,” she said with tears welling up in her eyes. Kaylee Silcox of Quincy was just 24 when she got sick. &ldqu...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - May 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local News Syndicated Local breast implant illness Dr. Mallika Marshall Source Type: news

Second Sight shares drop on Q1 miss
Shares in Second Sight Medical (NSDQ:EYES) have dropped today after the medical device maker missed expectations on Wall Street with its 1st quarter results. The Sylmar, Calif-based company posted losses of $7.5 million, or 16¢ per share, on sales of $1 million for the 3 months ended March 31, seeing losses grow 29.8% while sales shrunk 4.2% compared with the same period during the prior year. Analysts on Wall Street were expecting to see losses per share of 14¢, which Second Sight medical came in just above. “With a focus on execution and our centers of excellence strategy, we had strong implant volume dur...
Source: Mass Device - May 4, 2017 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News MassDevice Earnings Roundup second-sight-medical Source Type: news

We Know How To Curb Epidemics. Can Alzheimer's Be Next?
I travel a lot, which means I spend much of my time in airports waiting to catch a flight. I use most of that time to work or catch up on email, but sometimes, when it’s really early in the morning or really late at night, I just sit at the gate and watch the people go by. And not too long ago I saw something that broke my heart. It was a couple my age, maybe a few years older. They were making their way to the gate. They were ordinary-looking folks, but as I looked at them closely I noticed that something wasn’t quite right. The man seemed confused, disoriented, distressed. The woman seemed stricken, sad. She ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

PVR and Steroid Implants -- A Good Fit? PVR and Steroid Implants -- A Good Fit?
Have dexamethasone implants changed the treatment landscape of proliferative vitreoretinopathy? Dr Sophie Bakri'eyes'the latest research.Medscape Ophthalmology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - April 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Ophthalmology Viewpoint Source Type: news

Terumo taps DeRyke as CV CEO | Personnel Moves – April 7, 2017
Terumo Corp. (TYO:4543) said yesterday it tapped Rob DeRyke as its new CV group prez & CEO, effective April 1, 2017, succeeding a retiring Mark Sutter. Prior to his appointment, DeRyke operated as Terumo CV group electromechanical systems division prez, the company said. “Under his leadership, Rob brought stability and improved profitability to the business,” Terumo Corp prez & CEO Shinjiro Sato said in a press release. DeRyke joined Terumo in 2012 as corporate quality VP, and has 25 years of experience in med device and pharmaceuticals, the company said. He has previously held positions at Ba...
Source: Mass Device - April 7, 2017 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: MassDevice staff Tags: Business/Financial News Active Implants AdvaMed Alphatec Holdings Inc. Anika Therapeutics Inc. Apollo Endosurgery Aurora Spine Baxter Biocorp Biogen Idec Biolase Technology Inc Bioventus LLC Bonesupport Clal Biotech Delcath Sys Source Type: news

VisionCare launches new clinical trial for telescope implant
VisionCare, Inc. said this week that the FDA approved its investigational device exemption for a new clinical trial in the U.S. evaluating its telescope implant in patients with end-stage macular degeneration. The Saratoga, Calif.-based company’s implantable miniature telescope, which was developed by Israeli inventor Dr. Isaac Lipshitz, is contraindicated for patients with previous intraocular or corneal surgery of any kind. This new clinical trial will study the effectiveness of the telescope implant in patients who were previously implanted with an intraocular lens. “The average patient, at least in Nor...
Source: Mass Device - January 13, 2017 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Clinical Trials Implants Optical/Ophthalmic Surgical VisionCare Ophthalmic Technologies Source Type: news

Reflections on the Future of Medicine
Recently, I traveled through China. I climbed mountains, hiked through forests, crossed deep valleys. I visited cities of every size. I floated across lakes and traveled beautiful shorelines churning with life. As a man of a certain age, I began to compare the permanence of the timeless landscape with the evanescence of my own existence. Yet, as a scientist, I knew these reflections were flawed. Scientists are trained to think in terms of aeons, millenia, and lifetimes. Consider the paradox. Is it the solid mountain or fragile the forest that is permanent? Is it the massive shoreline cliffs or the teeming shore life that...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 9, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Presbia announces 2-year Microlens data from PMA trial
Presbia (NSDQ:LENS) touted interim data today from its U.S. pivotal clinical trial, which it hopes will eventually support pre-market approval from the FDA for its Flexivue Microlens. The company is 2 years into the 3-year long trial and said that it anticipates submitting final data to the FDA in September 2017. The company’s lens is intended to correct presbyopia, farsightedness that is often age-related. Presbia’s custom lenses are implanted in the patient’s non-dominant eye in the hopes of helping the patient see near objects more clearly. To place the microlens in a patient’...
Source: Mass Device - December 23, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Clinical Trials Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Implants Optical/Ophthalmic Regulatory/Clearance Presbia Source Type: news

Blind patients to get bionic eyes in 2017: NHS to pay for 10 people to be fitted with eyes
THE NHS will pay for 10 people with an inherited form of blindness to be fitted with "bionic eye" implants. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - December 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Aesthetics at the International Dental Show (IDS) 2017: Ceramic innovations inspire
Precoloured veneering ceramics - infiltration method, staining techniques - economic production options for aesthetic restorations - a central theme of IDSPeople, who have beautiful eyes and lovely teeth, are beautiful. Because that is what the eye of the onlooker perceives first. The proportions have to be right and form a harmonious whole. As far as teeth are concerned, the dental industry has created a host of innovative methods and products over the past decades, which narrow the gap more and more between a high ideal and the achievable reality. These include modern diagnosis and therapy options (i.e. face scanners, ba...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - September 14, 2016 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Why Taller People May Be Better At Judging How Far Away Things Are
Tall people are better than short people at gauging how far away they are from objects in the middle distance, a new study reports. The researchers say the results are evidence for the idea that people’s spatial perception abilities are influenced by their height, and develop over time. The human brain depends on a certain model to provide “the best guess of where objects could be located,” said study co-author Teng Leng Ooi, a professor of optometry at The Ohio State University. That model, or “intrinsic bias,” is typically revealed when people have very little information about where an obje...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 6, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

MassDevice.com +5 | The top 5 medtech stories for August 18, 2016
Say hello to MassDevice +5, a bite-sized view of the top five medtech stories of the day. This feature of MassDevice.com’s coverage highlights our 5 biggest and most influential stories from the day’s news to make sure you’re up to date on the headlines that continue to shape the medical device industry. Get this in your inbox everyday by subscribing to our newsletters.   5. HeartWare recalls some HVAD implantable heart pumps on electrical fault risk HeartWare International this week recalled some of its HVAD implantable heart pumps on the risk of electrical faults from driveline contamination. The ...
Source: Mass Device - August 18, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: MassDevice Tags: News Well Plus 5 Source Type: news

Should Women Have Breast Implants Removed?
It was a story with a bit of irony, as well as ominous health warnings. Crystal Hefner, the 30-year-old wife of Playboy magazine mogul Hugh Hefner, announced in a story in People magazine last month that she'd had her breast implants removed because they were making her sick. Hefner posted a photo of her post-surgery self on Instagram with the caption, "Using 2016 to reclaim my health and embrace and love myself for the real me." The former model, now a DJ, was diagnosed a few months back with Lyme disease. Her symptoms included intolerance to foods and beverages as well as back, neck, and shoulder pain. Hefn...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 2, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

MassDevice.com +5 | The top 5 medtech stories for July 14, 2016
Say hello to MassDevice +5, a bite-sized view of the top five medtech stories of the day. This feature of MassDevice.com’s coverage highlights our 5 biggest and most influential stories from the day’s news to make sure you’re up to date on the headlines that continue to shape the medical device industry. Get this in your inbox everyday by subscribing to our newsletters.   5. Endotronix raises $32m Series C for wireless heart monitor Endotronix said today that it raised a $32 million Series C round for the wireless heart monitor it’s looking to commercialize. Participants in the round included...
Source: Mass Device - July 14, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: MassDevice Tags: News Well Plus 5 Source Type: news

Love Will Be The Death Of Us
Notes On The End Of My Marriage Author's note: This is a sincere attempt to learn the end of a relationship, a final love letter, of sorts. Some of the names have been changed and my former partner has consented its publication. 8.2011 -- The Beginning There is no easy way to masturbate into a small plastic container. I find this out as I approach climax, simultaneously holding the container in place while stoking my erection with the other hand. Truth be told, I don't actually masturbate very often -- perhaps something about the act I continue to find shameful. Suddenly: a rush of white light and a moment of fleeting ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 25, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Surgery-obsessed model Pixee Fox gets implants to make her eyes 'cartoon green' 
Pixee Fox, 26, from North Carolina, has just had her 19th cosmetic procedure after dreaming of changing her eye colour since she was a little girl. She has also had cosmetic surgery totalling over £80,000. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 2, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Presbia touts 6-month data for Flexivue microlens
Presbia (NSDQ:LENS) today reported interim data from a U.S. pivotal trial of its Flexivue microlens, touting an average gain of 5 lines of uncorrected near visual acuity and 99% maintenance of binocular uncorrected distance vision. The company reports a total of 421 subjects have been implanted with the Flexivue microlens in the trial, which is being carried out as the company seeks FDA premarket approval. Presbia said it is planning for a final PMA module submission in September 2017. An average gain of 5 lines of uncorrected near visual acuity in treated eyes, as well as a 99% rate of maintained binocular uncorrected dis...
Source: Mass Device - May 18, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Clinical Trials Optical/Ophthalmic Presbia Source Type: news

New implant set to join fight against U.S. painkiller epidemic
(Reuters) – Two companies are on the cusp of taking a new treatment for opioid addiction to the U.S. market at a time when lawmakers are seeking ways to arrest an epidemic of heroin and painkiller abuse that kills 78 Americans every day. Titan Pharmaceuticals Inc and privately owned Braeburn Pharmaceuticals have together developed a matchstick-sized implant that analysts expect will be approved next month, despite mixed reviews. Implanted into the arm, the treatment is designed to be less vulnerable to abuse or illicit resale than the oral drugs that are currently used to treat opioid addiction. The market for the im...
Source: Mass Device - April 29, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: MassDevice Tags: Pain Management Source Type: news

What to Expect When You're... Still Not Expecting
IVF Isn't About the Journey, It's About the Destination While some women may share their birth stories, I wanted to share our fertility story. Translating my mind's weavings into words on paper has helped me weather numerous storms, but throughout 2015 -- a year marred by a lot of heartbreak and too many hormonal injections -- when I've needed this kind of therapy the most, I maintained silence on a subject that hit me like a piece of fallen scaffolding. Instead, I relied heavily on the physical support of my husband, family and friends, all for whom I am extremely grateful. With each setback along this grueling and at ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Many Lens Implant Patients May Develop Cataracts Within 10 YearsMany Lens Implant Patients May Develop Cataracts Within 10 Years
Many patients who get lens implant surgery to correct vision problems may develop cataracts or elevated pressure around the eyes within 10 years after the procedures, a Swiss study suggests. Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Ophthalmology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Ophthalmology Headlines - March 7, 2016 Category: Opthalmology Tags: Ophthalmology News Source Type: news

Many lens implant patients may develop cataracts within 10 years
(Reuters Health) - Many patients who get lens implant surgery to correct vision problems may develop cataracts or elevated pressure around the eyes within 10 years after the procedures, a Swiss study suggests. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - March 4, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

RIP medical device pioneer Alfred Mann | Personnel Moves
Alfred Mann, a medical device entrepreneur who helped develop several groundbreaking technologies, died yesterday at age 90, shortly after stepping down from a pair of companies he founded. Mann founded 17 companies over his 70-year career, in industries ranging from aerospace to medtech, according to the L.A. Times. After Johns Hopkins University researchers in 1969 asked him to help create a longer-lasting pacemaker, Mann turned his eye from the aerospace industry to medtech, according to the Times. In later years he founded several medical device companies, including MiniMed, which Medtronic (NYSE:MDT) acquired for...
Source: Mass Device - February 26, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Business/Financial News Abiomed Inc. Advanced Bionics LLC ConMed Corp. Corindus Vascular Robotics Gynesonics Hansen Medical Inc. LifeImage mannki Medtronic MedX Health Penumbra Inc. Personnel Moves Second Sight Medical Products I Source Type: news

Behind the Headlines' Top Five of Top Fives 2015
In this study, researchers wanted to see why this is and if there could be any human applications.Researchers collected white blood cells from African and Asian elephants. They found that elephants have at least 20 copies of a gene called TP53. TP53 is known to encourage cell "suicide" when DNA is damaged, stopping any potential cancer in its tracks. In contrast, humans are thought to have only a single copy of the TP53 gene.Of course the big question – the elephant in the room, if you will – is how we can boost TP53 activity in humans to stimulate a similar protective effect. The simple answer is: we...
Source: NHS News Feed - December 24, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: QA articles Medical practice Special reports Source Type: news

Behind the Headlines Top Five of Top Fives 2015
In this study, researchers wanted to see why this is and if there could be any human applications. Researchers collected white blood cells from African and Asian elephants. They found elephants have at least 20 copies of a gene called TP53. TP53 is known to encourage cell "suicide" when DNA is damaged, stopping any potential cancer in its tracks. In contrast, humans are thought to have only a single copy of the TP53 gene. Of course the big question – the elephant in the room, if you will – is how we can boost TP53 activity in humans to stimulate a similar protective effect. The simple answer is: we do...
Source: NHS News Feed - December 24, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: QA articles Medical practice Special reports Source Type: news

pSivida surges on Medidur data
Psivida (NSDQ:PSDV) shares surged today after the company said its Medidur drug-device combination met the primary endpoints in a Phase III clinical trial for treating posterior uveitis. Medidur uses the same injectable implant and drug as the Iluvien drug-device combo pSivida licensed to Alimera Sciences (NSDQ:ALIM) for treating diabetic macular degeneration. Iluvien won FDA approval in September 2014. Like Iluvien, Medidur is designed to release the corticosteroid flucinolone acetonide over3 years after being implanted in the back of the eye. Watertown, Mass.-based pSivida said the 129-patient, r...
Source: Mass Device - December 22, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Optical/Ophthalmic Drug-Device Combinations Clinical Trials pSivida Corp. Source Type: news

A happy coincidence for Irish tot with cochlear implants
Roisin and her cousin Mia enjoying a day at the park Editor’s note: The thing about clichés is sometime they are just spot on. “It’s small world after all,” sprung to mind when I heard about how hearing-restoration researcher Jeffrey Holt, PhD, met Roisin Morgan, an Irish toddler with hearing loss, on an Aer Lingus flight from Dublin to Boston. Read Holt’s recount of their meeting, and watch the reunion video. On Dec. 16, 2015, as I boarded my flight from Dublin to Boston, there was a family with a three-year-old daughter. I noticed the little girl had bilateral cochlear ...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - December 22, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jeff Holt Tags: Parenting Research cochlear implant Greg Licameli Jeffrey Holt Otolaryngology Department Source Type: news

12 Amazing Things We Learned About The Human Body In 2015
The human body is a source of mystery. But every year, scientists get just a little better at understanding its secrets.  Of course, 2015 has been no different. In the past year, researchers have created better access to proven therapies, developed futuristic new technologies that may change the way we approach disease and even enacted more complete disease screening processes to keep us healthy.  Read on to learn more. Here’s to more scientific discoveries in 2016!   @media (max-width: 969px) { #desktop { display: none; } } @media (min-width: 970px) { #mobile { display: none; } } #g-body-de...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 22, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Can You Think Yourself Into A Different Person?
For years she had tried to be the perfect wife and mother but now, divorced, with two sons, having gone through another break-up and in despair about her future, she felt as if she’d failed at it all, and she was tired of it. On 6 June 2007 Debbie Hampton, of Greensboro, North Carolina, took an overdose of more than 90 pills – a combination of ten different prescription drugs, some of which she’d stolen from a neighbor’s bedside cabinet. That afternoon, she’d written a note on her computer: “I’ve screwed up this life so bad that there is no place here for me and nothing I can contr...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 19, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

A View From the Losing Side of Health Care
For the last three hours I've been crunching numbers, trying to figure out how not to pay $600 to $800 a month for a health insurance policy that won't cover any medical expenses until I've paid anywhere from $7000 to $9000 in deductibles. Then, even if the deductible is met, I'd only get partial benefits until I pay an out of pocket maximum ranging from $11,000 to $14,000. I'd reach these totals only from a catastrophic health event - a hospitalization, emergency room visit, or devastating diagnosis. I finally conclude that I have no choice. I'll be paying for the promise of a service that I'm not likely to use in 2016. ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 7, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

pSividia eyes knee market, releases earnings
pSivida (NSDQ:PSDV) released its fiscal year earnings for 2015 yesterday and said it’s eyeing an entrance into the orthopedic knee market with a new drug-device implant. The company said it is slated to submit an investigational new drug application with the FDA and begin a study of a new implant using its Durasert technology to treat severe osteoarthritis pain in the knee. Psivida claims the new device would be surgically implanted in the knee and provide sustained delivery of a corticosteroid directly to the joint for approximately 6 months. “With over 10 million cases of knee osteoarthritis and 700,000 knee ...
Source: Mass Device - September 10, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Drug-Device Combinations Implants Surgical pSivida Corp. Source Type: news

Bionic Eyes, Stem Cells and Gene Therapy: 3 Cutting Edge Cures for Blindness
Scientists have long known that while our eyes do most of the heavy lifting of sight—taking in particles of light, bending and refracting them, turning them into electrical impulses—we actually “see” with our brains. Between the eye and the mind, however, a lot can go wrong, and until recently, if someone’s vision started to go or was never there to begin with, there wasn’t much doctors could do about it. Now, thanks to an explosion of new research, scientists at a stage in biology where they “know a heck of a lot about the causes of vision problems,” says Dr. Paul A. Sieving...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 9, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized argus II bionic eye blindness Cure Gene Therapy Research stem cell therapy vision loss Source Type: news

Are you thinking what I’m thinking? The rise of mind control
Mind control still sounds like the stuff of sci-fi movies. But it’s coming closer, with implants that can help people with paralysis and, further off, devices to send thoughts between humansAhundred electrodes are pressed tightly against my scalp and a mixture of salt water and baby shampoo is dripping down my back. The goings-on in my slightly agitated brain are represented by a baffling array of graphs on a screen in front of me. When I close my eyes and relax, the messy spikes and troughs become neat little waves.Next, scientists here at Newcastle University’s Institute of Neuroscience induce small electric ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 22, 2015 Category: Science Authors: Tom Ireland Tags: Neuroscience Internet Medical research Research and development Technology Source Type: news

McGuire to take reins at Second Sight, Greenberg heads board | Personnel Moves
Second Sight Medical‘s (NSDQ:EYES) newly appointed CEO Will McGuire is set to take the reins starting August 18, the company said. Announced in June, former CEO Dr. Robert Greenberg will become chairman of the board at Second Sight, replacing Alfred Mann who will become chairman emeritus, according to the Sylmar, Calif.-based ‘bionic eye’-developing company. “Will brings an immense depth of experience in the life sciences industry that will advance Second Sight’s commercialization of the Argus II retinal prosthesis. After a thorough search process, management and the board of directors are con...
Source: Mass Device - August 13, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Invuity Monteris Medical Personnel Moves Second Sight Medical Products Inc. Volcano Corp. Source Type: news

UCLA–Tel Aviv study suggests REM sleep helps the brain capture snapshots of dream images
When we sleep, we experience our most vivid dreams and vigorous brain activity during the rapid eye movement, or REM phase. Although scientists have long suspected that our eyes flicker in response to what our unconscious mind sees in our dreams, no one has been able to prove it.  Now, an international team of researchers led by UCLA’s Dr. Itzhak Fried is the first to demonstrate that during dreams, our eyes and brains respond similarly to how they react to images when we’re awake. Published in the Aug. 11 online edition of Nature Communications, the findings offer a rare glimpse into the working...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 12, 2015 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Become Who You Are: The World's First Legally Recognized Cyborg May Be Onto Something
Bodies are imperfect. Every combination of flesh, nerves, bones and blood has its particularities and limitations, some of which restrict the experience of its owner more severely than others. For issues that threaten our safety and survival, technology offers a helping hand. Glasses improve vision. Crutches, wheelchairs and prosthetics help with movement. For those with abnormal heart rhythms, there are pacemakers.  But what about the less dire limitations, for example, those that affect your aesthetic perception? How would your life be different if you couldn't see color, if the range of your vision was limited to v...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - July 20, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Second Sight touts 3-year Argus II retinal prosthesis data
Second Sight Medical (NSDQ:EYES) said data from a 3-year study of its Argus II retinal prosthesis system show positive results in previously blind patients. The study, published in Ophthalmology yesterday, examined 30 patients implanted with the Argus II, designed to restore partial vision by stimulating viable retinal cells in patients with severe to profound retinitis pigmentosa, the Sylmar, Calif.-based company said. At 3 years, 29 patients remain implanted with the system and 89% of subjects performed better with the system in visual function tasks, the study reports. Eighty percent of patients benefited from the ...
Source: Mass Device - June 24, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Clinical Trials Implants Optical/Ophthalmic Second Sight Medical Products Inc. Source Type: news

The Early Bird Gets the Sperm ... to the Egg
This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - June 12, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Cataract Basics and Beyond: Why Treatments Are Now Better Than Ever
Kira Manusis, MD Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology Co-Director, Cataract, Cornea and Refractive Surgery New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai __________________________ If you are fortunate to live long enough, you will probably develop a cataract, the leading cause of vision loss in the United States. According to the National Eye Institute, more than half of all Americans develop a cataract by age 80. As our nation's senior population expands, the number of people aged 40 or older with cataracts is expected to double from 24.4 million to about 50 million by 2050. Cataract Basics A cataract is a clouding ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 10, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

I'm Deaf and Gay -- And That's Totally Okay
Ever since I can remember, I have identified as gay. No internal confusion, no coming-out horror story. My label as a gay male, while it came with understandable insecurities, never greatly interfered with my daily life. I might even call myself lucky in that sense. However, a deep part of me never felt truly comfortable among the large heterosexual population surrounding me. Strike one. Now, throw another curveball that is widely but falsely seen as a debilitating condition: being Deaf. Strike two. I grew up with the idea that I had two strikes against me. I have had to face discrimination from all directions: hearin...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 3, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Our patients’ stories: overcoming breast asymmetry
High school can be hard enough on a girl’s self esteem. But for Kate*, typical rites of passage — like shopping for a prom dress — were impossible. After trying on dress after dress that didn’t fit, Kate ultimately settled on something in black, with draped fabric to strategically cover her chest. Alterations made the gown wearable, but Kate still worried about whether her date would notice something that had begun to seem increasingly unusual to her about her body. Kate suffered from severely asymmetrical, or lopsided, breasts. As she moved through puberty, her right breast grew beyond a D cup size...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - May 14, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Guest Blogger Tags: Our patients’ stories Source Type: news