Fight Aging! Newsletter, January 16th 2023
Conclusions Implanted Hair Follicle Cells Produce Remodeling of Scar Tissue Assessment of Somatic Mosaicism as a Biomarker of Aging The Gut Microbiome of Centenarians https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2023/01/the-gut-microbiome-of-centenarians/ The state of the gut microbiome is arguably as influential on health as exercise. Various microbial species present in the gut produce beneficial metabolites, such as butyrate, or harmful metabolites, such as isoamylamine, or can provoke chronic inflammation in a variety of ways. An individual can have a better or worse microbiome, assessing these and other...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 15, 2023 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

A High Level View of Efforts to Modulate Inflammaging and Immunosenescence of the Aged Immune System
Change and disruption in the immune system is an important component of degenerative aging. Broadly, the immune system becomes ever more inflammatory (inflammaging) while also becoming ever less effective (immunosenescence). The immune system is not only responsible for defending against invasive pathogens and destroying errant cells, but it is also tightly integrated into the normal processes of tissue maintenance and operation. When immune cells become inflammatory, they abandon the range of tasks needed to keep tissues functional. Short-term inflammation is necessary in response to injury and infection, but unresolved, ...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 11, 2023 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, October 10th 2022
Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 9, 2022 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Interventions Testing Program Results for Rapamycin and Arcabose in Combination
The Interventions Testing Program (ITP) at the National Institute on Aging (NIA) performs rigorous, expensive assessments of the ability of various (usually pharmaceutical) interventions to slow aging in mice. Conducting a study with rigor in this context means the use of large numbers of mice spread across multiple facilities, with careful control of the environment in order to minimize both known and unknown confounding factors in life span studies. Most of the interventions tested over the past twenty years of the ITP, on the basis of earlier studies suggesting that they may slow aging, in fact fail to extend life in mi...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 6, 2022 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, November 15th 2021
This article will review the relationship between diabetes mellitus and AD as it relates to tau pathology. More understanding of the link between diabetes mellitus and AD could change the approach researchers and clinicians take toward both diseases, potentially leading to new treatments and preventative strategies in the future. Signaling from White Fat Tissue Contributes to Age-Related Hair Follicle Dysfunction https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2021/11/signaling-from-white-fat-tissue-contributes-to-age-related-hair-follicle-dysfunction/ Changes in fat tissue behavior in the skin take place with age,...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 14, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Reviewing the Literature on Prevention of Cellular Senescence in Stem Cells
In today's open access paper, the authors report on a literature search for efforts to reduce cellular senescence in stem cell populations. The majority of the work they list, involving the assessment of pharmacological agents that can influence the onset of cellular senescence, has taken place in cell cultures, an environment that has very little relevance to what happens in stem cell niches in a living organism. Stem cells in a petri dish undergo very different rates of replication, have different stresses and signals, are not subject to interactions with supporting cells of the niche, and so forth. Thus I'd be in...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 9, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, April 19th 2021
In conclusion, airway pressure treatment and adherence are independently associated with lower odds of incident AD diagnoses in older adults. Results suggest that treatment of OSA may reduce risk of subsequent dementia. (Source: Fight Aging!)
Source: Fight Aging! - April 18, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Cap-Independent Translation of mRNA as a Common Mechanism of Longevity
Researchers here show that increased levels of cap-independent translation (CIT) of messenger RNA (mRNA) take place in a diverse set of interventions known to modestly slow aging in mice, suggesting it to be a common phenomenon in these shifts of metabolism towards a slower pace of aging. CIT is a process that in part drives the movement of mRNA, produced from genetic blueprints, into ribosomes for the production of proteins. Since protein levels determine cell behavior, the way in which translation of mRNA into proteins takes place is important. The work here makes a compelling case to link altered CIT levels to mTORC1 in...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 12, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, April 12th 2021
In conclusion, the MR exhibited the protective effects against age-related behavioral disorders, which could be partly explained by activating circulating FGF21 and promoting mitochondrial biogenesis, and consequently suppressing the neuroinflammation and oxidative damages. These results demonstrate that FGF21 can be used as a potential nutritional factor in dietary restriction-based strategies for improving cognition associated with neurodegeneration disorders. Senescent T Cells Cause Changes in Fat Tissue that are Harmful to Long-Term Health https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2021/04/senescent-t-cells-cause...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 11, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

The Latest Data from the Interventions Testing Program: Nicotinamide Riboside has No Effect on Mouse Life Span
The Interventions Testing Program (ITP) at the National Institute on Aging runs very rigorous, costly life span studies in large numbers of mice, picking a few interventions to test each year. The usual outcome is that a treatment with some interesting past results is found to have absolutely no effect on life span when run through the rigor of the ITP process. We should all bear this in mind whenever modest life span extension in mice is reported by researchers elsewhere in the community. Based on past ITP data, a great many such results are the result of chance or poor experimental design. Will the ITP ever get ar...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 9, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, September 14th 2020
This study is the first to provide a direct link between this inflammation and plaque development - by way of IFITM3. Scientists know that the production of IFITM3 starts in response to activation of the immune system by invading viruses and bacteria. These observations, combined with the new findings that IFITM3 directly contributes to plaque formation, suggest that viral and bacterial infections could increase the risk of Alzheimer's disease development. Indeed, researchers found that the level of IFITM3 in human brain samples correlated with levels of certain viral infections as well as with gamma-secretase activ...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 13, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Hormone Therapy in Postmenopausal Women Correlates with Lesser Senescent Cell Signaling
This study examined whether menopausal hormone therapies, in the form of oral conjugated equine estrogens (oCEE) and transdermal 17β-estradiol (tE2), altered the circulating levels of a specific set of SASP proteins in women who had undergone natural menopause. Growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF15), tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1), FAS, and macrophage inflammatory protein 1α (MIP1α) were measured in serum. Results were compared among menopausal women participating in the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study randomized to either placebo (n = 38), oral conjugated equine estrogen (oCEE, n = 37), or tra...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 11, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Wearable Sweat Sensor Made from Microbial Nanocellulose
Researchers in Brazil have developed a wearable sweat sensor made from microbial nanocellulose. The natural polymer provides a breathable interface with the underlying skin and allows sweat to travel through for electrochemical analysis using printed electrodes. The system can measure a wide variety of metabolites and biomarkers present in sweat, and could be useful for monitoring conditions such as diabetes. Wearable sensors are developing apace, and hold significant promise in monitoring various biomarkers. However, developing materials that interface well with the skin is a challenge, with many sensors, including pla...
Source: Medgadget - August 18, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Materials Medicine Sports Medicine Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, July 20th 2020
This study was the first to demonstrate a causal relationship between glial senescence and neurodegeneration. In this study, accumulations of senescent astrocytes and microglia were found in tau-associated neurodegenerative disease model mice. Elimination of these senescent cells via a genetic approach can reduce tau deposition and prevent the degeneration of cortical and hippocampal neurons. Most recently, it was shown that clearance of senescent oligodendrocyte progenitor cells in AD model mice with senolytic agents could lessen the Aβ plaque load, reduce neuroinflammation, and ameliorate cognitive deficits. This...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 19, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Repetitive Element Activity is Reduced in Mice Subject to Interventions that Modestly Slow Aging
Today's open access paper is a companion piece to a recent discussion of repetitive element activity as a potential biomarker of biological aging. In today's paper, the authors note that a number of interventions that modestly slow aging in mice also reduce the activity of repetitive elements in the genome. Many forms of repetitive element are the remnants of ancient viruses, sequences that are capable of copying themselves into new locations in the genome, but are normally suppressed. A fair amount of attention has been given to retrotransposons, one category of repetitive elements, in the context of aging in recent years...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 14, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs