Robot Lengthens Disconnected Bowels to Restore a Contiguous Gut
A number of congenital conditions result in missing parts of the gastrointestinal tract, such as esophageal atresia, while a few others can necessitate surgical removal of a part of the bowel that then has to be reconnected. Fragile and precious newborns are perhaps the most common patients for procedures requiring bowel regeneration and reconnection. In terms of esophageal atresia, the current standard of care, known as a Foker process, puts the child into an induced coma so that body movement doesn’t hamper the disconnected ends of a malformed esophagus from being pulled together by sutures attached to the back. N...
Source: Medgadget - January 17, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Surgery Source Type: blogs

Flourish Magnetic Device for Non-Surgical Treatment of Esophageal Atresia
The FDA is now allowing the introduction of Cook Medical‘s Flourish Pediatric Esophageal Atresia Anastomosis device as a non-surgical option for treatment of esophageal atresia, a birth defect in which the esophagus is not connected to the stomach due to a poorly formed esophagus. Two catheters with magnetic tips are positioned at the ends of the disconnected esophagus, one delivered transorally and the other via a gastric catheter through the stomach. The magnetic tips pull at each other and eventually push through the tissue to have the catheters meet each other. The child’s natural ability to heal allows th...
Source: Medgadget - May 16, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: GI Pediatrics Surgery Source Type: blogs