Live the Wheat Belly lifestyle, get off prescription medications
Take a look at the list of medications people have been able to stop by following the Wheat Belly lifestyle. These represent medications prescribed by doctors to, in effect, “treat” the consequences of consuming wheat and grains. They prescribe drugs to treat inflammation, swelling, skin rashes, gastrointestinal irritation, high blood sugars, airway allergy, joint pain, high blood pressure, leg edema and other abnormal effects caused by wheat and grains. The list includes anti-inflammatory and pain medication, acid reflux drugs, injectable and oral drugs for diabetes, numerous anti-hypertensive agents, asthma i...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - October 27, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates autoimmune blood sugar bowel flora cholesterol Gliadin gluten-free grain-free grains Inflammation undoctored Weight Loss wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Depression: Common medication side effect?
This study is especially thought-provoking, given that more and more people are taking medications with depression or suicidal thoughts as possible side effects. The CDC just released updated data showing a troubling recent rise in suicide rates, and that 54% of those who die from suicide do not have a known mental health disorder, so this is an important public health issue. That said, it is important to note: in this study, people who used these medications were more likely to be widowed and have chronic health problems, both of which are associated with a higher risk of depression. And many (but not all) of these medica...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - July 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Monique Tello, MD, MPH Tags: Anxiety and Depression Drugs and Supplements Health Source Type: blogs

Might Depression Be Linked to One of These Popular Medications?
If you’re taking beta blockers, certain kinds of anxiety drugs, certain types of painkillers (including ibuprofen), proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) (used to treat acid reflux), ACE inhibitors (used to treat high blood pressure), or anti-convulsant drugs, you may be at greater risk for depression. That’s according to a new, large-scale study published earlier this week in JAMA. However, this was a correlational study, so it can’t say that these medications actually cause depression or not. It may be that people with greater health problems are more likely to take one of these medications and be depressed abo...
Source: World of Psychology - June 15, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: Depression General Medications Psychiatry Research Drugs cause depression popular medications Source Type: blogs

Why is magnesium so important?
One of the six core strategies in the Undoctored Wild, Naked, and Unwashed program for health and weight loss is restoration of magnesium. Magnesium deficiency is alarmingly common in today’s world. Why? Our reliance on filtered water that has had all of the magnesium removed, the reduced content of magnesium in modern crops, and the widespread use of proton pump inhibitors—-drugs prescribed to treat acid reflux and ulcers while reducing magnesium absorption. Remember those darned phytates in wheat and other grains that bind magnesium and other positively charged minerals in the intestinal tract, preventing ab...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - July 18, 2017 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Undoctored Wheat Belly Lifestyle a fib constipation Dr. Davis grain-free grains health healthcare heart rhythm hydrochlorothiazide kidney stones oxalate sudden death Source Type: blogs

Pharmaceutical Product Hopping: A Proposed Framework For Antitrust Analysis
Skyrocketing drug prices are in the news. Overnight price increases have riveted the attention of the public, media, and politicians of all stripes. But one reason for high prices has flown under the radar. When drug companies reformulate their product, switching from one version of a drug to another, the price doesn’t dramatically increase. Instead, it stays at a high level for longer than it otherwise would have without the switch. Although more difficult to discern than a price spike, this practice, when undertaken to prevent generic market entry, can result in the unjustified continuation of monopoly pricing, bur...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - June 1, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Michael Carrier and Steve Shadowen Tags: Costs and Spending Drugs and Medical Innovation antitrust drug reformulations Hatch-Waxman Act prescription drug prices product hopping Source Type: blogs

Did Big Pharma BUY Big Media?
Healthcare is at the top of the list of societal problems in the U.S. Healthcare interactions are unsatisfying to most people, costs are out of control and cost every American nearly $10,000 per person per year while bleeding 17.5% of GDP, more than any other nation on earth for a system that ranks low or last  in quality compared to other developed countries. For a problem as big as healthcare, big enough to cripple the entire economy in addition to bankrupting more and more Americans, you would think that media reporting would be filled with debate, criticisms, and in-depth coverage about the problems in healthcare....
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - May 2, 2017 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Undoctored abc bias big pharma cbs cnn drug industry fox gluten grains health healthcare illness media nbc pharmaceutical tv wheat Source Type: blogs

H. pylori, a true stomach “bug”: Who should doctors test and treat?
In 1982, two Australian scientists discovered that a certain bacterium, Helicobacter pylori, was a common cause of persistent stomach inflammation and stomach ulcers. This realization revolutionized ulcer treatment. While fairly common, this infection usually causes no symptoms, but it can sometimes lead to ulcers in the stomach or the very first part of the small intestine (duodenum), and to certain types of stomach cancer. There is also evidence linking H. pylori infection to other conditions like iron-deficiency anemia and vitamin B12 deficiency. The bacteria are thought to spread through contaminated water, vomit, or f...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - April 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Wynne Armand, MD Tags: Digestive Disorders Health Infectious diseases Tests and procedures Source Type: blogs

Wellbeing: The Interdependencies of the Body, Mind & Spirit
By JIM PURCELL In 1891, Dr. Luther Gulick proposed a red triangle as the YMCA symbol. In his words, the equal sides of the triangle stood for “man’s essential unity– body, mind and spirit– each being a necessary and eternal part of man, being neither one alone but all three.” True then, and equally true today, it highlights what is missing from most traditional approaches to wellness–the mental, emotional, and spiritual components. Hardly surprising given the remarkable resistance mental illness treatments encounter. The term “mental illness” usually refers to recognized ment...
Source: The Health Care Blog - February 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Diabetes, Inc.
For Big Pharma and others who profit from human disease, type 2 diabetes is the gift that keeps on giving. Approaching one trillion dollars in worldwide costs, type 2 diabetes is largely a man-made condition. For the majority of people, type 2 diabetes (and, to a substantial degree, type 1 diabetes also) is created by: Cutting dietary fat and cholesterol–as advised the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the USDA, the American Diabetes Association, the American Heart Association, and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Increased consumption of grains–that raise blood sugar higher than table sugar,...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - November 14, 2016 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle blood sugar diabetes gluten grains HbA1c low-carb low-fat Source Type: blogs

Memo To The President: The Pharmaceutical Monopoly Adjustment Act Of 2017
Since 1980, Congress has enacted many laws granting pharmaceutical manufacturers monopolies that no other industry enjoys. These extra monopolies were created with the expectation that monopoly profits would spur greater investment in research to find important new drugs. In fact, they have caused US consumers to pay higher prices for medicines for longer periods of time while making the pharmaceutical industry far more profitable than any other industry. I believe the next president and Congress should take several key steps, which I outline below, to roll back these costly, unnecessary monopolies. The Current Landscape C...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - September 13, 2016 Category: Health Management Authors: Alfred Engelberg Tags: Costs and Spending Drugs and Medical Technology Health Policy Lab Bayh-Dole Act Big Pharma Gilead Hatch-Waxman Act johnson & johnson pfizer Source Type: blogs

Oh So Quietly, Evidence of Bad Health Care Corporate Leadership Accumulates - Three AstraZeneca Settlements
While the news media is distracted by seemingly more spectacular issues, we hear the steady drip, drip, drip oflegal cases suggesting just how systemically bad the leadership of big health care organizations is.  From February 2015 to now, for example, there have been three cases involving multinational pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca.Settlement of Allegations of Kickbacks to Give AZ Drugs Preferred Status in FormulariesFirst, in February 2015, reported in most detail by Ed Silvermanin the Wall Street Journal,AstraZeneca has agreed to pay the federal government $7.9 million to settle allegations the drug maker paid k...
Source: Health Care Renewal - September 8, 2016 Category: Health Management Tags: AstraZeneca bribery deception impunity kickbacks legal settlements Source Type: blogs

CMS Releases New Prescription Drug Cost Data
On August 18, 2016, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) released new prescription drug data, physician-level data on prescriptions for drugs paid for by Medicare Part D in 2014. This new data set “describes the specific medications prescribed for 38 million Medicare Part D enrollees, who represent about 70 percent of all Medicare beneficiaries.” This is the second annual release of the data. According to Niall Brennan, CMS Chief Data Officer, “With this data release, patients, researchers and providers can access valuable information about the Medicare prescription drug program. Today&rs...
Source: Policy and Medicine - September 1, 2016 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs

Digitizing Self-Healthcare with Google, Pfizer, Under Armour, Walgreens and WebMD
How can digital technologies enable self-healthcare in novel ways? This was the theme of a meeting sponsored by Pfizer Consumer Healthcare and hosted by Google, with the title, “Advancing Consumer Health through New Technology and Next Generation OTC Healthcare” held on 12th April 2016 at Google offices in Manhattan’s Chelsea neighborhood. Pharmaceutical brand drugs switching to over-the-counter packaged goods, the Cellscope Otoscope used by parents checking their young children’s earaches, connected shoes and earbuds for athletic enhancement, and omni-channel retail shopping….these are ...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - April 20, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Rx Source Type: blogs

Is Your Antacid Medication Ruining Your Gut?
Proton Pump Inhibitors are a class of Antacid Medication that are so common and considered to be so safe that they were even declassified as prescription drugs and are now available over-the-counter so that anyone can use them if they happen to have heartburn. With names like Omeprazole, Nexium, and Prilosec, the ‘little purple pill’ is advertised everywhere on billboards and TV ads with barely a mention that their might be consequences to suppressing stomach acid. There are consequences of any Acid Reflux Medication, however, like the Side Effects of Omeprazole and other proton pump inhibitors can lead to oste...
Source: Immune Health Blog - March 2, 2016 Category: Nutrition Authors: Kerri Knox, RN Tags: Digestive Health Infections Source Type: blogs

Can Your Antacid Cause Alzheimer’s Disease?
Can your antacid really cause Alzheimer’s Disease? Recent research suggests that, indeed, proton pump inhibitors, some of the most common drugs for reducing feelings of heartburn, can cause an increase in the ‘beta amyloid’ deposits in the brain that are indicative of Alzheimer’s Disease. This is in addition to some of the other serious Proton Pump Inhibitor Side Effects, like osteoporosis, magnesium deficiency and  heart rhythm problems; Antacid Medications can Even Ruin Your Gut. These problems can occur even when these heartburn relieving drugs are taken for short amounts of time. All too of...
Source: Immune Health Blog - February 26, 2016 Category: Nutrition Authors: Kerri Knox, RN Tags: Brain Health/ Neurologic Digestive Health Vitamin B12 alzheimers disease causes cause alzheimer's disease cause of alzheimers disease causes of alzheimers omeprazole side effects proton pump inhibitors proton pump inhibitors cause alzhei Source Type: blogs

Can Your Antacid Cause Alzheimer ’s Disease?
Can your antacid really cause Alzheimer’s Disease? Recent research suggests that, indeed, proton pump inhibitors, some of the most common drugs for reducing feelings of heartburn, can cause an increase in the ‘beta amyloid’ deposits in the brain that are indicative of Alzheimer’s Disease. This is in addition to some of the other serious Proton Pump Inhibitor Side Effects, like osteoporosis, magnesium deficiency and  heart rhythm problems; Antacid Medications can Even Ruin Your Gut. These problems can occur even when these heartburn relieving drugs are taken for short amounts of time. All too of...
Source: Immune Health Blog - February 26, 2016 Category: Nutrition Authors: Kerri Knox, RN Tags: Brain Health/ Neurologic Digestive Health Vitamin B12 alzheimers disease causes cause alzheimer's disease cause of alzheimers disease causes of alzheimers omeprazole side effects proton pump inhibitors proton pump inhibitors cause alzhei Source Type: blogs

Can Your Antacid Cause Alzheimer ’s Disease?
Can your antacid really cause Alzheimer’s Disease? Recent research suggests that, indeed, proton pump inhibitors, some of the most common drugs for reducing feelings of heartburn, can cause an increase in the ‘beta amyloid’ deposits in the brain that are indicative of Alzheimer’s Disease. This is in addition to some of the other serious Proton Pump Inhibitor Side Effects, like osteoporosis, magnesium deficiency and  heart rhythm problems; Antacid Medications can Even Ruin Your Gut. These problems can occur even when these heartburn relieving drugs are taken for short amounts of time. All too of...
Source: Immune Health Blog - February 26, 2016 Category: Nutrition Authors: Kerri Knox, RN Tags: Brain Health/ Neurologic Digestive Health Vitamin B12 alzheimers disease causes cause alzheimer's disease cause of alzheimers disease causes of alzheimers omeprazole side effects proton pump inhibitors proton pump inhibitors cause alzhei Source Type: blogs

Matthew’s incredible Wheat Belly transformation
Remember Matthew? I previously shared his story and photos, including his 80-pound weight loss and change in cholesterol values. But there is much more to his story that he has been sharing on the Official Wheat Belly Facebook page. Because the changes he described were so extensive, I’ve collected his comments here. Put together, Matthew’s health transformation is nothing short of astounding. He previously told us that hypertension and pre-diabetes have reversed with now normal blood pressure and blood sugars. But just read on and see how much more happened. Matthew’s experience is a terrific example of ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - November 27, 2015 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Success Stories acid reflux allergy asthma cholesterol cramps gerd gluten grains heartburn IBS indigestion spastic colon Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

‘Growth Clouds’ On The Horizon For Health Spending?
I was honored to work with the National Health Expenditures (NHE) Team in the CMS Office of the Actuary throughout 1995-2012, and I am honored again to have the opportunity to provide some thoughts on long-range spending trends in the U.S. Many health policy experts have referred to these accounts as the “gold standard” for comprehensive and authoritative information about the cost of health care in the United States, and the NHE Team’s articles on both the historical and projected NHE accounts routinely appear at the top of Health Affairs’ “most frequently read” list. The current focus ...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - November 23, 2015 Category: Health Management Authors: Richard Foster Tags: Costs and Spending Drugs and Medical Technology Featured Health Professionals Hospitals Medicaid and CHIP Medicare Payment Policy Aging Cadillac tax Nurses PCORI physician assistants Physicians States Source Type: blogs

How a Simple Little Pill Ended Up Costing 99 Percent More Than Its Ingredients
By DEVON HERRICK A recent New York Times article profiled a pair of ultra-expensive pain medications designed to go easy on the stomach. Common pain relievers, like aspirin, ibuprofen and naproxen are prone to irritate the stomach if taken repeatedly throughout the day. A newer class of pain medication, called cox-2 inhibitors, are the preferred pain relievers for those who cannot take nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on a long term basis. Celecoxib, the generic version of Celebrex, is now available at a cost of about $2 per tablet, but that can add up to about $700 to $1000 per year. More than ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - November 4, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Simon Nath Tags: THCB aspirin Devon Herrick Duexis Ibuprofen Naproxen New York Times Vimovo Source Type: blogs

How a Simple Little Pill Ended Up Costing 1000 Percent More Than Its Ingredients
By DEVON HERRICK A recent New York Times article profiled a pair of ultra-expensive pain medications designed to go easy on the stomach. Common pain relievers, like aspirin, ibuprofen and naproxen are prone to irritate the stomach if taken repeatedly throughout the day. A newer class of pain medication, called cox-2 inhibitors, are the preferred pain relievers for those who cannot take nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on a long term basis. Celecoxib, the generic version of Celebrex, is now available at a cost of about $2 per tablet, but that can add up to about $700 to $1000 per year. More than ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - November 4, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Simon Nath Tags: THCB aspirin Devon Herrick Duexis Ibuprofen Naproxen New York Times Vimovo Source Type: blogs

How Government Policy Promotes High Drug Prices
It is a bedrock principle of capitalism that as competition erodes profits on established products, enterprises will invest in innovation to earn higher profits from new products. US law governing prescription pharmaceutical markets abandons that principle and gives every new drug a long-term monopoly that prohibits competition. It also discourages competition between medicines based on comparative price or effectiveness. High prices and slow innovation cycles are the inevitable result and will remain so unless Congress makes fundamental changes in existing law. According to the Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association, it...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - October 29, 2015 Category: Health Management Authors: Alfred Engelberg Tags: Costs and Spending Drugs and Medical Technology Featured Payment Policy Quality 21st Century Cures Act Big Pharma Comparative Effectiveness FDA generic drugs Hatch-Waxman Act Prescription Drugs Source Type: blogs

What medications have you been able to stop on the Wheat Belly lifestyle?
I posed this question on the Wheat Belly Facebook page recently and received an overwhelming response. Here, I share a partial list of the responses: medications people have been able to stop by following the Wheat Belly lifestyle. Just take a look at this incredible list: these represent medications prescribed by doctors to, in effect, “treat” the consequences of consuming wheat and grains. They prescribe drugs to treat the inflammation, swelling, skin rashes, gastrointestinal irritation, high blood sugars, airway allergy, and other abnormal effects all caused by wheat and grains. The list includes anti-infl...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - October 6, 2015 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle asthma cholesterol diabetes drugs gluten grains hypertension prescription medication reflux Source Type: blogs

A drug to treat a drug to treat a drug . . .
Stacy shared her story of wheat- and grain-free success after experiencing the all-too-common disaster called modern healthcare. “I had been having gastrointestinal problems off and on for quite a while (a year or so). I would have days where I could barely function. Since I am a middle-aged woman, I kept thinking it was a combination of hormonal issues and ‘something I ate’–turns out it was! On June 22nd, everything came to a head and I was absolutely miserable. Long story short, the EGD showed I had gastritis and my scans and colonoscopy confirmed I had ileitis. The gastroenterologist put me on N...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - October 3, 2015 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle colitis gastritis gluten grains ileitis Source Type: blogs

Data-Mining Study Explores Health Outcomes from Common Heartburn Drugs
Results of a data-mining study suggest a link between a common heartburn drug and heart attacks. Credit: Stock image. Scouring through anonymized health records of millions of Americans, data-mining scientists found an association between a common heartburn drug and an elevated risk for heart attacks. Their preliminary results suggest that there may be a link between the two factors. For 60 million Americans, heartburn is a painful and common occurrence caused by stomach acid rising through the esophagus. It’s treated by drugs such as proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) that lower acid production in the stomach. Taken by ...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - August 12, 2015 Category: Research Authors: Srivalli Subbaramaiah Tags: Computers in Biology Pharmacology Big Data Bioinformatics Drug Response Medicines Source Type: blogs

Do proton pump inhibitors cause heart attacks?
This study used a technique called “data-mining” to extract information from years of electronic medical records (EMRs) and included about 70 thousand patients in their primary analysis.  They describe the data-mining technique in the article, which seems to boil down to assigning a mathematical function to certain defined variables (patients taking PPIs) and an outcome (heart attack) to see if the two events are associated. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 18, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Meds GI Heart Source Type: blogs

Do heartburn drugs cause osteoporosis? A gastroenterologist answers.
Every week, I am asked by patients if their heartburn medicine causes osteoporosis. The most effective heartburn medicines are called proton pump inhibitors, or PPIs. If you watch more than an hour of TV per week, then you have seen ads for some of them. Nexium, Prilosec, and Protonix are three examples of these medicines. Many of them are now available over-the-counter at reduced dosages. Patients today are incredibly informed, and sometimes misinformed, about their medical conditions and their treatments. Most of their information is from the internet, and it’s easy for patients to become unwittingly trapped in the...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 7, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Meds Endocrinology GI Source Type: blogs

The Digital Doctor: Is Natural Language Processing the Breakthrough We’ve Been Waiting For?
By BOB WACHTER, MD Natural language processing might seem a bit arcane andtechnical – the type of thing that software engineers talk about deep into the night, but of limited usefulness for practicing docs and their patients. Yet software that can “read” physicians’ and nurses’ notes may prove to be one of the seminal breakthroughs in digital medicine. Exhibit A, from the world of medical research: a recent studylinked the use of proton pump inhibitors to subsequent heart attacks. It did this by plowing through 16 million notes in electronic health records. While legitimate epidemiologic quest...
Source: The Health Care Blog - June 23, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: THCB Source Type: blogs

Medco Will Pay $7.9 Million to Resolve Kickback Allegations Related To Formulary Placement; Follows Astra Zeneca’s $7.9 Million Payout Earlier This Year
Medco Health Solutions Inc., a wholly-owned subsidiary of the pharmacy benefit manager Express Scripts Holding Company, has agreed to pay $7.9 million to settle allegations that it engaged in a kickback scheme in violation of the False Claims Act, the Justice Department announced on Wednesday.  Medco provides pharmacy benefit management (PBM) services to clients who receive subsidies under the Medicare Retiree Drug Subsidy program. PBMs such as Medco act as intermediaries between pharmaceutical manufacturers and third-party payers to administer a plan’s prescription drug benefits. PBMs use the pur...
Source: Policy and Medicine - May 22, 2015 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan Source Type: blogs

Doris: Acid reflux, acne, tremor gone!
Doris shared the photos and some of the many health benefits she experienced while living the Wheat Belly lifestyle: “I started my journey March 28th, 2014. I’m just shy of turning 48 years old. I began this lifestyle change to lose weight but have since changed my outlook. “In 2012, my doctor wanted to put me on cholesterol medication. Thankfully, he gave me time to get it fixed with diet. He advised me to continue with my low fat eating! I had already been doing this for years, falling on and off the wagon and binging until I hurt and couldn’t sleep from going to bed with a tummy so full. &ldquo...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - May 21, 2015 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Success Stories acid reflux acne binging cholesterol heartburn tremor Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

Physician Payments Sunshine Act: Vermont Gift Ban and Disclosure Law Update
This report outlines the number of samples and expenditures, listed by manufacturer. 2014 Reports Due April 1, 2015 As a reminder, 2014 disclosures for expenditures and samples from January 1 – December 31, 2014 are due by April 1, 2015, using the following documents:  2014 Expenditures Disclosure Form and 2014 Samples Disclosure Form Vermont’s Prescribed Products Gift Ban and Disclosure Law As a background, Vermont law bans most gifts and requires manufacturers of prescribed products, including pharmaceuticals, biological products, and medical devices, to “disclose allowable expenditu...
Source: Policy and Medicine - February 25, 2015 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan Source Type: blogs

The Need For Publicly Funded Trials To Get Unbiased Comparative Effectiveness Data
Comparative effectiveness research was one of the hotly debated components of the Affordable Care Act. The pharmaceutical industry is marketing driven, with pharmaceutical companies spending more on marketing than they do on research and development. The need for a marketing edge can also drive drug development. As illustrated by the discussion below of Gazyva and Nexium, drugs can be developed at higher doses than the drugs they are intended to replace. When the newer, higher-dose drugs are tested against the older, lower-dose drugs, the trials are intended to show that the newer, higher dose drugs are superior to the old...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - February 20, 2015 Category: Health Management Authors: Robert Bohrer Tags: All Categories Business of Health Care Comparative Effectiveness Innovation Pharma Policy Research Source Type: blogs

AstraZeneca Pays $7.9 Million To Resolve Kickback Allegations Related to PBM Formulary Placement
AstraZenaca last week settled with the Department of Justice over allegedly offering kickbacks to Medco Health Solutions, a pharmacy benefits manager, in exchange for Medco maintaining AstraZeneca’s drug Nexium in favorable status on its formulary. AstraZeneca settled the allegations for $7.9 million.  A drug’s listing as “brand-preferred” on a pharmacy benefit manager’s formulary crucial to a brand. Pharmaceutical companies want to be on a formulary so that when a physician writes a prescription for Nexium, for example, the patient can get it covered under their insurance when they ...
Source: Policy and Medicine - February 18, 2015 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan Source Type: blogs

The $500 Billion Medicare Slowdown: A Story About Part D
A great deal of analysis has been published on the causes of the health care spending slowdown system-wide — including in the pages of Health Affairs. Much attention in particular has focused on the remarkable slowdown in Medicare spending over the past few years, and rightfully so: Spending per beneficiary actually shrank (!) by one percent this year (or grew only one percent if one removes the effects of temporary policy changes). Yet the disproportionate role played by prescription drug spending (or Part D) has seemingly escaped notice. Despite constituting barely more than 10 percent of Medicare spending, ou...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - October 21, 2014 Category: Health Management Authors: Loren Adler and Adam Rosenberg Tags: All Categories Hospitals Medicare Payment Pharma Physicians Policy Spending Source Type: blogs

Clever Hospitals Find Another Way to Snag New Patients
Last month, I wrote about a hospital system in Colorado that had discovered a way to cross market its more profitable emergency room services if a patient first came to its urgent care center. Pretty clever! Then recently I came across another health care marketing trick close to home and just as sly. As I sat on a New York subway one sizzler of a day, an ad for an ice cream cone grabbed my attention. Ice cream! Hot day! After a closer read, I realized the ad was not touting ice cream but the Center for Advanced Digestive Care, a part of New York Presbyterian, one of the city’s most prestigious hospitals and well kno...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - August 19, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

What’s In Our Medicine Cabinets?
By HANS DEUVEFELT, MD  Recently published statistics show that the top-grossing medication in the U.S. for 2013 was the antipsychotic Abilify (aripiprazole) with over $6 billion in sales, narrowly beating out the previous few years’ winner, Nexium. The past decade’s dominating pharmaceuticals have been Lipitor (atorvastatin) for high cholesterol and Nexium (esomeprazole) for acid reflux. Nexium […] (Source: The Health Care Blog)
Source: The Health Care Blog - June 20, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: THCB Abilify Drug sales Medicalization Nexium Pharmaceutical sales Viagra Source Type: blogs

Sarah no longer counts calories
Sarah relates this story of how, after years of struggle with health and weight, she finally found the answer. Her story is especially interesting as she worked in the weight loss industry. “I have struggled all my life with my weight and food was always my comforter. “In my late 30′s, I managed to lose 40 kg [88 lbs] and reach my goal weight with a major weight loss company in which I became a consultant. But, if I was previously fat and unhappy, I was now thin and unhappy. My years of chronic low-fat dieting led me to develop binge eating disorder. I felt like such a fraud and I was struggling to main...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - April 29, 2014 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

No Longer Count Calories And Lose Weight Like Sarah
Sarah relates this story of how, after years of struggle with health and weight, she finally found the answer. Her story is especially interesting as she worked in the weight loss industry. “I have struggled all my life with my weight and food was always my comforter. In my late 30′s, I managed to lose 40 kg [88 lbs] and reach my goal weight with a major weight loss company in which I became a consultant. But, if I was previously fat and unhappy, I was now thin and unhappy. My years of chronic low-fat dieting led me to develop binge eating disorder. I felt like such a fraud and I was struggling to maintain my...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - April 29, 2014 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Pharmalot... Pharmalittle... The Weekend Nears
And so, yet another working week will soon draw to a close. Not a moment too soon, yes? As always, this is our treasured signal to daydream about weekend plans. Our agenda is rather modest, although we do look forward to spending time not only with our full roster of short people but some of the Pharmalot ancestors. We also hope to catch up on sundry tasks and catch up on some reading. Why not, you know? But what about you? Given the upcoming holiday break, perhaps this marks the beginning of a longer stretch than usual. Presumably, all sorts of activities and possibilities are in store. Spending time with special people o...
Source: Pharmalot - December 20, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs

Pharmalot... Pharmalittle... The Weekend Nears
And so, another working week is about to draw to a close. As you may recall, this is our treasured signal to daydream about weekend plans, atlhough we are getting an early start, since we have another use-it-or-lose it day at hand. What does this mean? We will post a couple of stories and then off we go. In any event, our weekend agenda is modest. We plan to attend yet another soccer match played by short people and then hang with some old friends. And then there are those leaves to rake. But what about you? Anything groovy planned? This is a lovely time of year to enjoy the outdoors, of course. You could boost the economy...
Source: Pharmalot - November 15, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs

Ranbaxy whistleblower reveals how he exposed massive pharmaceutical fraud
(CBS News) Among the drugs prescribed to Americans, 80 percent are generic drugs, and 40 percent of drugs are now made overseas in countries such as China and India where U.S. oversight is weaker. Recently, CBS News' senior correspondent John Millerhas been looking at one of those companies -- Ranbaxy. Dinesh Thakur, an American-educated chemical engineer, was hired by Ranbaxy, back in 2003. He would later become a whistleblower, exposing massive fraud by the generic pharmaceutical giant, a company that sold Americans drugs like the generic version of Lipitor. His information led to Ranbaxy pleading guilty to seven f...
Source: PharmaGossip - November 6, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: insider Source Type: blogs

Jerry C.
Jerry’s story may be short, but it’s just another example of how powerful removing grains from your diet, and body, can really be. – Dr. Perlmutter. I have had heartburn/GERD most of my life. I started the Paleo diet in May of this year and immediately removed all grains from my diet. Within a week all of my heartburn/GERD was gone. I no longer take Nexium. I have lost over 25 pounds, walk 4 miles each day and overall feel better than I have in many years. Who would have though removing grains from my diet would cure my heartburn/GERD?! -Jerry C. The post Jerry C. appeared first on Dr. Davi...
Source: Renegade Neurologist - A Blog by David Perlmutter, MD, FACN - October 29, 2013 Category: Neurologists Authors: gbadmin Tags: Success GERD Heartburn Nexium Paleo Source Type: blogs

Purple Haze: How the Purple Pill is Fighting Maine on Cheap Canadian Imports
In case you haven't heard, the pharmaceutical industry -- i.e., PhRMA -- is suing Maine, attempting to block a new law that goes into effect today. "The law, the first of its kind, sanctions the direct purchase of mail-order drugs from some foreign pharmacies. It has ignited a court battle with the pharmaceutical industry and set the stage for a broader fight over access to less-costly medication" (see here for the story plus a copy of PhRMA's complaint and Maine's motion to dismiss). PhRMA contends that the practice could expose residents to tainted or counterfeit medication. "It's not a safety issue,"...
Source: Pharma Marketing Blog - October 9, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Tags: PurpleZone AstraZeneca Drug Importation Purple Pill counterfeit medicine Source Type: blogs

Pharmalot... Pharmalittle... Good Morning
Rise and shine, everyone. The middle of the week is here, which is, generally, a busy time. Our morning, in fact, got off to an usually interesting start thanks to National Public Radio and WNYC, a local affiliate, which called us to discuss the Merck reorganization (you can listen here). We do this sort of thing, now and again, in case you were not aware. We are also available for conferences, bar mitzvahs and satires. While you ponder the possibilities, here are some tidbits to start the day. Hope you have a smashing time at work and do stay in touch... J&J Says Dispute With Boehringer May Cause Doxil Shortage (Bloom...
Source: Pharmalot - October 2, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs

Pharmalot... Pharmalittle... Good Morning
Greetings, everyone. How are you today? A warm sun and crisp breeze are enveloping the Pharmalot corporate campus this morning, where the official mascots are chasing bunnies and the short people are hustling off to their schoolhouses. Busy, busy. And so are we. This calls, of course, for our mandatory cup of stimulation. After all, it is still early in the week. Without some stimulation, we may not make it through the next few days. Perhaps you relate. In any event, here are the tidbits. Have a productive day and keep us in mind when something interesting comes up... Aesica Pharma Is Fined After Worker Is Sprayed With Che...
Source: Pharmalot - September 24, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs

Pharmalot... Pharmalittle... Good Morning
Hello, everyone, and welcome to another working week. Yes, the weekend has come and gone, although we hope you had a chance to relax and refresh yourselves, because that familiar routine of meetings and deadlines and what-not has resumed. This calls, of course, for a cup or two of needed stimulation and, as always, we invite you to join us. Our flavor today is Pumpkin Spice. Meanwhile, here is the usual menu of tidbits to get you going. We hope you have a grand day and drop us a line if you hear something interesting... FDA Grants Breakthrough Status To Glaxo And Genmab Leukemia Drug (Pharma Times) Merck Settles False Viox...
Source: Pharmalot - September 16, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs

Just When You Thought Meta Tags Were Safe, Along Comes Twitter's "Ad Card"
You might recall this post I made three years ago: "Who's in Charge of Your 'Invisible' Metadata? WARNING: Don't Invoke the 'Invisibility Rule'".In that post I pointed out that Google automatically grabs meta data or "tags" (invisible text that describes the content of the web page) from Rx product web sites when generating the content for natural search results. Meta data text is written by the web developer, but it is visible to the Google search engine, which republishes it verbatim as if it owns the content without getting permission from the web developer.If you are an unscrupulous pharma marketer,...
Source: Pharma Marketing Blog - September 10, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Tags: AstraZeneca social media meta data Source Type: blogs

AZPurpleZone: A Nexium Branded YouTube Channel. "Unusual" for Pharma? Yes. "Engaging Social Media?" No!
"AstraZeneca believes that it is important to share information with patients by engaging with them online," says Ken Graham, Commercial Business Leader, GI, AstraZeneca, in a post to AZ Health Connections Blog (here). "To that end, AstraZeneca recently launched a NEXIUM YouTube channel." It's called "AZPurpleZone."According to AZ's own "white paper" on social media (see attachment to this post), social media is the "catch-all term for internet activities that engage or encourage engagement through online discussions or interactions. While static websites are often the first 'on...
Source: Pharma Marketing Blog - July 17, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Tags: YouTube AstraZeneca social media Nexium Source Type: blogs