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Home Remedies: Stop a nosebleed in 4 steps
Most nosebleeds aren't serious and will stop on their own or by following self-care steps. Seek emergency medical care?if nosebleeds: Follow an injury, such as a car accident Involve a greater than expected amount of blood Interfere with breathing Last longer than 30 minutes even with compression Occur in children younger than age 2 ?Don't [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - October 18, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Posterior nosebleed: Causes and how to stop them
What is a posterior nosebleed and how can you stop a posterior nosebleed? What is the difference between a posterior and anterior nosebleed? (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - August 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Ear, Nose and Throat Source Type: news

What caused my nosebleed? DR MARTIN SCURR gives answers
Every week, DR MARTIN SCURR answers your health questions. This week a patient asks what might have caused their heavy ten-day nosebleed (file pic) which led to surgery. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How to stop a nosebleed - GP reveals why you are doing THIS wrong
NOSEBLEEDS can be caused by a number of different things - such as injury to the nose, temperature or blowing the nose too hard. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - July 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Skating On Thin Ice
Treatment TermsChildren's health Sub-Title Life-Threatening Condition Discovered After Fall During Hockey Game Author Burgetta Wheeler Overview Colby Heath was a growing teenage boy, so his penchant for sleep didn't concern his mother. Nor did his occasional nosebleeds. Yet, as Colby's family now knows, those were clues that something was horribly wrong. Hero Imageskating_on_thin_ice_3.jpg Preview Image Content Blocks Header Playing Hockey was Risk Factor for Congenital Liver Abnormality Content“He went from being a seemingly healthy kid who plays hockey to a kid who needs aliver transplant...
Source: dukehealth.org: Duke Health News - June 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: klh85 at duke.edu Source Type: news

Pediatric Liver Transplant for Teen Hockey Player
Treatment TermsChildren's healthLiver transplant CategoriesAdvanced treatments Sub-Title Rare Liver Condition Discovered After Fall During Hockey Game Author Burgetta Wheeler Overview Colby Heath was a growing teenage boy, so his penchant for sleep didn't concern his mother. Nor did his occasional nosebleeds. Yet, as Colby's family now knows, those were clues that something was horribly wrong. Hero Imageskating_on_thin_ice_3.jpg Preview Image Content Blocks CTA HeaderLiver Transplants at Duke CTA LinkLearn more Section Features Call To Action Header Playing Hockey was Risk Factor for Congenit...
Source: dukehealth.org: Health Tips - June 15, 2017 Category: Primary Care Authors: klh85 at duke.edu Source Type: news

What Causes Anemia?
Discussion One of the most common problems in pediatrics is anemia. It is defined as “a lower than normal value for the related measurements of hemoglobin, hematocrit, and number of red blood cells”, usually 2 standard deviations below the normal for age. Normal hematological values change with age. For a discussion of which values are used click here. The most common type of anemia in childhood is iron deficiency which is commonly caused by inadequate stores (e.g. premature infant), inadequate intake (e.g. poor nutrition) or blood loss (e.g. menses). Anemia screening is recommended at age 9-12 months, and for...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - May 15, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Thousands Face Lead Hazards as Trump Eyes Budget Cuts Thousands Face Lead Hazards as Trump Eyes Budget Cuts
Laicie Manzella lived in a rundown house on Buffalo ’ s east side when three of her children tested with dangerously high levels of lead in their blood. Her oldest son suffered nosebleeds, body rashes and a developmental disorder requiring speech therapy.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - April 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pediatrics News Source Type: news

Hundreds More Lead Hotpsots Are Identified As Trump Prepares To Gut Programs
BUFFALO, New York (Reuters) - Laicie Manzella lived in a rundown house on Buffalo’s east side when three of her children tested with dangerously high levels of lead in their blood. Her oldest son suffered nosebleeds, body rashes and a developmental disorder requiring speech therapy. Checking her apartment, county health inspectors found 15 lead violations, all linked to old paint in this blue collar city plagued by lead poisoning. A Reuters investigation found at least four city zip codes here where 40 percent of children tested from 2006 to 2014 had high lead levels, making Buffalo among the most dangerous lead hots...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A father ’s hope for his son’s life
Juan and Fredy in 2017. Juan was looking forward to having his son, Fredy, 14, finally come home to live with him. The teenager had been living under the care of his grandmother since he was a toddler. But on that long-awaited homecoming day, Juan was quickly jarred from feeling great joy to grave concern. “When I saw his face, one side looked very different from the other and his lip was swollen,” says Juan. “He admitted right away that his face had been hurting.” Juan remembered that the last time he’d seen his son — more than one year ago — Fredy’s face had looked slightly...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - April 12, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Kat J. McAlpine Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Dr. Cameron Trenor Dr. Carolyn Rogers Dr. Darren Orbach Dr. Reza Rahbar Dr. Salim Afshar interventional radiology juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma tumor Source Type: news

Dealing with nosebleeds in children
Though they’re not usually a serious medical concern, nosebleeds in children can be frightening and socially disabling. Nosebleeds at school, friends’ houses or birthday parties can be quite disruptive, as many people are scared of blood and often nobody really knows what to do about it. What causes nosebleeds?  Almost all nosebleeds are caused by a drying of the nasal mucosa. The inside of our noses is lined by mucosa — the same moist tissue that lines our mouth — and just like in our mouths, constant airflow around that mucosa can dry and irritate it. Considering the fact that we breathe thro...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - March 16, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Dr. David Roberson Tags: Kids' Safety Parenting David Roberson General Pediatric Otolaryngology Program nosebleeds in children Sports & exercise Source Type: news

Your NEJM Group Today: Confusion & Epistaxis Case / End-of-Life Discussions in Primary Care / Virginia Rheumatology Opportunity (FREE)
By the Editors Here's today's offering from NEJM Group:NEJM Clinical Practice Center: Case record: A 73-year-old man with a history of heart failure, pulmonary hypertension, … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - March 13, 2017 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Labetalol in acute cocaine toxicity: is it safe?
3 out of 5 stars Acute Toxicity from Topical Cocaine for Epistaxis: Treatment with Labetalol. Richards JR et al. J Emerg Med 2017 Mar;52:311-313. Abstract There has long been a debate among toxicologists — still unresolved — as to whether it is safe to use a beta-blocker to treat cocaine-related hypertension and tachycardia. The (theoretical) concern is that since cocaine is both an α- and a β-agonist, blocking the β-receptors could lead to unopposed α stimulation with increased severe hypertension. Some authors contend that in this setting, labetalol would be safe since it blocks bot...
Source: The Poison Review - March 1, 2017 Category: Toxicology Authors: Leon Gussow Tags: Medical beta blocker cocaine epistaxis labetalol safety toxicity Source Type: news

The Drive To Dismantle ‘Obamacare’
Writing on Inauguration Day, I find it difficult to divert my attention from what is starting and all that is ending, or at risk of it. Since it’s generally ill advised to write about one thing while thinking about another, I feel compelled to choose a topic in that domain. The assault on the Affordable Care Act, or “Obamacare,” is the obvious choice. The one problem for me and you alike in this area is the volume of ink (or number of electrons) already directed at it. Are there novel things left to say? I believe there are, and surprisingly perhaps, at a very fundamental level. The co...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Great Science Fiction Isn’t Just About Facts. It’s About Imagination.
Warning: if you haven’t watched “The OA” but plan to, we don’t recommend spoiling it by reading this post. When Andy Weir first self-published The Martian ― a book that troubles itself with scientific accuracy, but not, say, the color of its protagonist’s hair ― it was a quick hit. His 99-cent ebook sold 35,000 copies before publishers took notice and Crown Publishing bought the rights. The rest is history. Or a version of it, starring Matt Damon. The book made it to The New York Times’ bestseller list, an impressive feat for a title belonging to the thought-to-be esoteric subg...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 6, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

5 Tips For Getting The Most Out Of Your Humidifier
Static hair, nosebleeds and cracked skin are all signs that dry, cold winter weather has arrived. Great. People with seasonal allergies may notice other discomforts like irritated sinuses or eczema, too, according to Anju Peters, an allergist and immunologist at Northwestern Memorial Hospital.  One solution that can provide relief? The humidifier. Basically, it’s a small machine that puts moisture back in the air, Peters explained. “You may feel more comfortable breathing. Your nose might feel better. And your skin might feel better,” she said. They can be really helpful for people who live...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 21, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

5 Tips For Getting The Most Out Of Your Humidifier
Static hair, nosebleeds and cracked skin are all signs that dry, cold winter weather has arrived. Great. People with seasonal allergies may notice other discomforts like irritated sinuses or eczema, too, according to Anju Peters, an allergist and immunologist at Northwestern Memorial Hospital.  One solution that can provide relief? The humidifier. Basically, it’s a small machine that puts moisture back in the air, Peters explained. “You may feel more comfortable breathing. Your nose might feel better. And your skin might feel better,” she said. They can be really helpful for people who live...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 21, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic PathWays: What's the diagnosis?
This week's case highlights platelet aggregation studies from a 27-year-old woman with a history of easy bruising, nosebleeds and heavy menstrual bleeding. What diagnosis can be determined from the peripheral smear? View the case and make your diagnosis. Learn more about Mayo Clinic PathWays. (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - November 15, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Home Remedies: Are nosebleeds a nuisance?
Nosebleeds, also called epistaxes (ep-ih-STAK-seez), involve bleeding from the inside of your nose. The lining of your nose contains many tiny blood vessels that lie close to the surface and are easily damaged. The two most common causes of nosebleeds are dry air ? when your nasal membranes dry out, they're more susceptible to bleeding [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - November 3, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Health Tip: Prevent Frequent Nosebleeds
-- Frequent nosebleeds often are triggered by dry air. So they may be preventable. The Seattle Children's Hospital offers these prevention strategies: Run a humidifier if the air tends to be dry. This helps keep tissues in the nose moist. Apply a... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - November 3, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

Health Tip: Prevent Frequent Nosebleeds
Title: Health Tip: Prevent Frequent NosebleedsCategory: Health NewsCreated: 11/3/2016 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 11/3/2016 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Kids Health General)
Source: MedicineNet Kids Health General - November 3, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Source Type: news

Von Willebrand Disease: the Under-the-Radar Bleeding Disorder
Constant nosebleeds, persistent bruising and super-heavy periods are signs you shouldn ’t dismiss. (Source: U.S. News - Health)
Source: U.S. News - Health - October 7, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lisa Esposito Source Type: news

Salt-Based Spray May Help Chronic Nosebleeds
Saline as good as medications for condition called hemorrhagic telangiectasia, study finds (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - September 6, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Salt-Based Spray May Help Chronic Nosebleeds
TUESDAY, Sept. 6, 2016 -- A simple salt-based spray is as effective as medicated sprays in controlling chronic nosebleeds, a new study contends. " This research highlights that there could be a benefit even in the simplest of interventions, " said... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - September 6, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

Make the Diagnosis: Questionable Bleeding
(MedPage Today) -- Case Findings: A 19-year-old man presented at the ED vomiting blood. He mentioned that he had several nosebleeds that week, but didn't think anything of it as he frequently suffered from nosebleeds. " It runs in the family. My dad gets them all the time too, he said. Upon exam, his physician noticed an oral red macule on his tongue and slight conjunctival injection. What is your diagnosis? (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - August 23, 2016 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Q and A: Nosebleeds Usually Nothing to Worry About
DEAR MAYO CLINIC: Are recurring nosebleeds anything to worry about? I seem to have them more often lately. What ’s the best way to stop a nosebleed quickly? ANSWER: Most people experience a nosebleed at one time or another. They tend to happen more often in younger children and older adults. Bleeding often results from a [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - August 8, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Nose problems: illustrated
Problems affecting the nose including epistaxis, polyps, carcinoma and septal perforation. (Source: GP Online Education)
Source: GP Online Education - June 21, 2016 Category: Primary Care Tags: 15.4 ENT and Facial Problems Source Type: news

New, Natural ED Treatment
There is a new natural therapy for erectile dysfunction. That comes as a big surprise to most patients who suffer from ED — because they’ve been told again and again their only solution is a Big Pharma booster like Viagra, or that they should just accept their condition as a part of aging. Common ED Beliefs ED has become so common, it’s the accepted norm in men of “a certain age.” It now affects 30 million men in America. But it shouldn’t. Age is not the issue. It’s the most natural thing in the world to have sex well into your 70s and 80s. ED Causes Your doctor has probably told ...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - May 26, 2016 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Al Sears Tags: Men's Health Source Type: news

What Causes Vomiting?
Discussion Regurgitation is a passive expulsion of ingested material out of the mouth. It is a normal part of digestion for ruminants such as cows and camels. Nausea is an unpleasant abdominal perception that the person may describe as feeling ill to the stomach, or feeling like he/she is going to vomit. Anorexia is frequently observed. Nausea is usually associated with decreased stomach activity and motility in the small intestine. Parasympathetic activity may be increased causing pale skin, sweating, hypersalivation and possible vasovagal syndrome (hypotension and bradycardia). Retching or dry heaves is when there are sp...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - May 2, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

What You Need to Know About Inhalant Abuse & Addiction
It usually takes both considerable money and effort for an addict to acquire their drug of choice. After all, with the exception of alcohol, most addictive substances are either controlled or illegal. Unfortunately, there is one category of drugs that is not only legal, it’s widely available and affordable — inhalants. Inhalant abuse is the deliberate sniffing of common household products with the purpose of getting high. More than 22.9 million Americans have experimented with inhalants at some point in their lives, but the percentage of usage is highest among children ages 12-15. Addiction to inhalants is part...
Source: Psych Central - March 17, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Liz Greene Tags: Addictions Children and Teens Disorders Family General Parenting Substance Abuse Treatment aerosol blood vessels Brain Brain Damage Central Nervous System cyclohexyl nitrite Diethyl ether halothane Heart Rate huffing In Source Type: news

What it’s like to be in otolaryngology: Shadowing Dr. Gillespie
As a medical student, do you ever wonder what it’s like to be an ear, nose and throat (ENT) physician? Here’s your chance to find out. Meet Christina Gillespie, MD, an ENT specialist and featured physician in AMA Wire’s® “Shadow Me” Specialty Series, which offers advice directly from physicians about life in their specialties. Read her insights to help determine whether a career in otolaryngology might be a good fit for you. “Shadowing” Dr. Gillespie Specialty: Otolaryngology Practice setting: Group practice (but I served in the U.S. Army as an ENT physician for 14 ye...
Source: AMA Wire - February 8, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Lyndra Vassar Source Type: news

Months Long Gas Leak Sickens California Community
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Laura Gideon and her family endured the sickening stench from an out-of-control natural gas leak for about a month before they could no longer tolerate the nausea, headaches and nosebleeds. After she went to the emergency room in November vomiting and with a severe migraine, Gideon, her husband and their two children abandoned the only home they'd ever known together in the upscale Los Angeles suburb of Porter Ranch. They moved in with her parents about 10 miles away to await a fix that could still be months away. "We're in mourning now," she said. "We didn't ever want to leave. W...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - January 11, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: General News Source Type: news

California Residents Fear Long-Term Impact of Gas Leak
When Robyn Shapiro’s 18-month-old son started suffering from nosebleeds last fall, she knew it was time to leave her home in Porter Ranch, the Los Angeles neighborhood where thousands of residents say they have been sickened by a massive natural gas leak. Shapiro, 43, moved her family 15 miles away in early December and said her son’s health quickly improved. “We’re out of that air, and all of a sudden my son’s not having respiratory problems,” she said. Shapiro and her family are among the more than 1,600 people who have left Porter Ranch since the Southern California Gas Co. discovered...
Source: TIME: Top Science and Health Stories - January 11, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Katie Reilly Tags: Uncategorized California climate change Environment Source Type: news

Why Is It Called Christmas Disease?
Discussion Too much or too little causes the important homeostatic balance of life to be upset. This is true of the interactions between the circulatory and hematology systems of the body and their important function in ensuring that the circulatory system plumbing is not leaking (i.e. bleeding) and also not getting plugged up (i.e. thrombosis). A healthy system has adequate numbers of functional platelets, and protein synthesis of the factors needed for a balanced hemostasis system. An adequate amount of Vitamin K is needed for some factors activity. Additionally the absence of any drugs that interfere with platelets or t...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - December 14, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

What It’s Like to Be Inpatient with Dissociative Identity Disorder: Part 1
I’m sitting in an ambulance. The blonde­ paramedic gazes at me in the blue light, asking me if it is all right that the proper lights are off. I suppose something in my face alarms her enough to gasp: “Is it too dark?” I reassure her with a shake of my head that no, it isn’t too dark. I feel childlike in my Adventure Time leggings and sweatshirt/­tunic. I never noticed the white lines on ambulance windows were full of glitter. One of the littles hops up to front in a gush of joy. Glitter, of all things, glitter! I swallow a glomp of air and push her back in the garden with the rest. L peeks ...
Source: Psych Central - December 12, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Lilu Tags: Caregivers Children and Teens Disorders Dissociation Dissociative General Personal Stories Psychiatry Psychology Treatment Depression Dissociative Identity Disorder Hospitalization Mental health crisis Multiple Personalities Source Type: news

Yoga for Better Sleep
Yoga is a gentle and restorative way to wind down your day. A national survey found that over 55% of people who did yoga found that it helped them get better sleep. Over 85% said yoga helped reduce stress. You can use supportive props like bolsters, blankets, and blocks to make poses comfortable so that you can stay in the pose for longer and continue to breathe. Your breath is key to be able to relax in these poses. Breath in yoga is equally important—if not more important—as the physical pose. Use a gentle and calming yoga breath technique called Ujjayi Breath, also known as Ocean Breath or Victorious Breath....
Source: New Harvard Health Information - December 4, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Marlynn Wei, MD, JD Tags: Behavioral Health Complementary and alternative medicine Exercise and Fitness Sleep restorative yoga Source Type: news

Dyspnea, Minor Bleeds Led Causes for Stopping Ticagrelor in TrialDyspnea, Minor Bleeds Led Causes for Stopping Ticagrelor in Trial
"As clinicians we shouldn't underestimate the impact on patients of nosebleeds and bruising," said a PEGASUS TIMI 54 researcher, so before treatment patients should hear about even nonmajor risks. Heartwire from Medscape (Source: theHeart.org)
Source: theHeart.org - November 17, 2015 Category: Cardiology Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

5 Body Parts I Didn't Know Could Get Pregnant
The first time I became pregnant, I prepared myself for the changes I knew would be coming. I started to lather my belly with tummy butter meant to prevent stretch marks, and I bought a pack of Preggie Pops to help with the upcoming nausea. That was the change I was expecting: a baby bump and a few weeks of the pukes. I was wrong. By the end of it, I felt like every part of my body was suffering from some sort of pregnancy symptom, and most of them surprised me. I was pregnant from the top of my head to the bottom of my swollen feet. These were my top five surprisingly pregnant body parts: 1. Brain. My previously quick-wit...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 3, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

HHT: Just a Nosebleed, or Something More?
PITTSBURGH. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- HHT is a genetic disorder of the blood vessels. In severe cases it can lead to sudden bleeding or stroke. Researchers say HHT affects more than one in 5,000 people, but 90 percent of all people with HHT don’t know they have it. Now, new research may unlock the mystery behind the disease and give patients the best chance for treatment and a cure. (Source: Medical Headlines From Ivanhoe.com)
Source: Medical Headlines From Ivanhoe.com - November 3, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why is my husband's nose always bleeding? By Dr Martin Scurr
'My husband is continually getting nosebleeds - he can have up to four or five a day.' Dr Scurr advises. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 27, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Vietnamese 51-year-old loses his eyes, nose and cheeks to mystery disease
WARNING GRAPHIC CONTENT: Huynh Van Dat, from Saigon, began suffering nosebleeds in 2004, but slowly the disease ate away at his face, leaving him blind and bedridden. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 23, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The heartbreaking story of the man with no face: Vietnamese 51-year-old loses his eyes, nose and cheeks to mystery disease which has left him in utter agony 
WARNING GRAPHIC CONTENT: Huynh Van Dat, from Saigon, began suffering nosebleeds in 2004, but slowly the disease ate away at his face, leaving him blind and bedridden. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 23, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

UPMC-University of Pittsburgh Named Center of Excellence for Rare...
Frequent nosebleeds are often the first sign of HHT, which can cause sudden, catastrophic bleeding.(PRWeb September 02, 2015)Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/09/prweb12938378.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - September 2, 2015 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

School’s Wi-Fi Making Son Sick, Parents Say In Lawsuit
SOUTHBORO (CBS) — A boarding school in central Massachusetts is being sued by parents who claim the school’s Wi-Fi signal is making their son sick. The Worcester Telegram & Gazette reports that the unidentified plaintiffs have filed a lawsuit against the Fay School in Southboro. The parents say their 12-year-old son has “Electromagnetic Hypersensitivity Syndrome” and has suffered headaches, nosebleeds and nausea since the school activated a stronger wireless signal in 2013. The family is seeking $250,000 in damages and wants the school to switch to Ethernet cable Internet or turn down the Wi-Fi ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - August 25, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: nealjriley Tags: Health Local News Syndicated Local Southboro Wi-Fi Source Type: news

The drugs work: the truth about statins and SSRIs
Pharmacology can get a bad rap in the press. Professors George Davey Smith and David Nutt fight the case for statins and SSRIs.In a public lecture hosted by the British Association for Psychopharmacology and Bristol’s MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit (where I work), Professors George Davey Smith and David Nutt stripped away the sensationalisation and misinformation around statins and SSRIs. They come from very different fields, George is an epidemiologist and David a psychiatrist, but both fields can help us understand the efficacy and safety of drug treatments.George took on the topic of statins. George is a perfec...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 31, 2015 Category: Science Authors: Suzi Gage Tags: Science Drugs Mental health Statins Society Source Type: news

Nose balloon could be used to treat glue ear
ConclusionThis RCT aimed to assess the use of autoinflation as a treatment for glue ear. More than 300 children were included in the study and were randomly assigned to receive autoinflation, in addition to usual care for up to three months, or usual care alone. The use of autoinflation does appear to show some promise at one and three months, and the side effects were generally mild. However, this will only provide a solution for children who are able to perform the technique and do this regularly. This means it may not be a suitable treatment for everyone.This study's main strength is that it included a representative sa...
Source: NHS News Feed - July 28, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pregnancy/child Medical practice Source Type: news

Teen's Nosebleed Leads to Relatives Diagnosed With Illness
A trip to the doctor for a nosebleed lead to the potentially life-saving diagnoses for three members of a Texas family. (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - July 23, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Teenager's nosebleed saves three lives
Incredible chain of events led from a nosebleed to lifesaving treatments for a Texas girl and her parents (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - July 21, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How a teen's nosebleed saved her parents' lives
A Texas teenager's nosebleed led to a diagnosis of kidney disease, which caused both of her parents to get tested as potential organ donors (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - July 21, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news