Fight Aging! Newsletter, February 14th 2022
In conclusion, this first examination of the effects of age and the ageing process on the small intestinal microbiome demonstrates that the duodenal microbiome changes with increasing age, with significant decreases in duodenal microbial diversity due to increased prevalence of phylum Proteobacteria, particularly coliforms and anaerobic taxa. Given the key roles of small intestinal microbes in nutrient absorption and host metabolism, these changes may be clinically relevant for human health during the ageing process. Naked Mole Rats Exhibit Minimal Cardiac Aging https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2022/02/nake...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 13, 2022 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Continued Exploration of Age-Related Differences in the Human Gut Microbiome
In conclusion, this first examination of the effects of age and the ageing process on the small intestinal microbiome demonstrates that the duodenal microbiome changes with increasing age, with significant decreases in duodenal microbial diversity due to increased prevalence of phylum Proteobacteria, particularly coliforms and anaerobic taxa. Given the key roles of small intestinal microbes in nutrient absorption and host metabolism, these changes may be clinically relevant for human health during the ageing process. (Source: Fight Aging!)
Source: Fight Aging! - February 8, 2022 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Simple Color Change Test Identifies Wound Infections
Researchers at the University of Bath in the UK, along with outside collaborators, have developed a simple color change test that rapidly indicates whether a wound is infected with harmful bacteria. The test works by detecting virulence factors released by the bacteria, which prompt a simple color change in a solution. The test could help clinicians to determine whether to prescribe antibiotics, and may help to avoid unnecessary prescribing. As the test can be administered at the point of care, and does not require expensive and time-consuming laboratory analysis, it may be very useful in low-resource or remote regions. ...
Source: Medgadget - November 5, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Dermatology Diagnostics Materials Plastic Surgery uniofbath wound care Source Type: blogs

Food Intolerances: A Warning of Bad Things Ahead
I’ve recently discussed how the majority of food intolerances, whether to FODMAPs, histamine, nightshades, fructose, etc., are really manifestations of dysbiosis and SIBO. Here is another way to view these phenomena: Food intolerances are your body’s signal to you that serious deterioration in your health is coming. In other words, if all you do is choose to reduce or eliminate the offending food, you are still left with the massive disruption of your intestinal microbiome that caused the food intolerance in the first place, along with increased intestinal permeability and endotoxemia. So say you eliminate ferm...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - November 1, 2021 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Open microbiota prebiotic probiotic sibo small intestinal bacterial super gut undoctored wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, August 23rd 2021
In this study, we used the UK Biobank (n = 440,185) to resolve previous ambiguities in the relationship between serum IGF-1 levels and clinical disease. We examined prospective associations of serum IGF-1 with mortality, dementia, vascular disease, diabetes, osteoporosis, and cancer, finding two generalized patterns. First, IGF-1 interacts with age to modify risk in a manner consistent with antagonistic pleiotropy; younger individuals with high IGF-1 are protected from disease, while older individuals with high IGF-1 are at increased risk for incident disease or death. Second, the association between IGF-1 and risk ...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 22, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Fecal Microbiota Transplant from Young Mice Improves Cognitive Function in Old Mice
The gut microbiome shifts with age, reducing beneficial populations and increasing harmful populations that contribute to chronic inflammation. Today's research materials can be added to other examples in which an intervention to restore a more youthful gut microbiome in old animals results in improved function, both through a reduction in inflammation and increased production of beneficial metabolites such as butyrate, that promotes increased levels of BDNF and neurogenesis, among other effects. It is a challenge to pick apart which of the mechanisms are most influential, but restoring a more youthful gut microbiome is cl...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 18, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

To help restore healthy bowel flora, eat no GMOs
One of the most potentially harmful aspects of genetically-modified crops, or GMOs, are that such crops are often engineered to be resistant to specific herbicides or pesticides. A farmer therefore can spray an herbicide to kill weeds, while the GM crop plant survives. But it means that the plant now has herbicide residues in it. Or it may contain its own built-in pesticide such as Bt toxin, expressed by the plant because the gene for this pest-resistant compound has been spliced into the plant’s genetic code. So GMO crops pose a double-whammy: the crop itself with new genetically-programmed components, especially pr...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - October 29, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates dysbiosis Inflammation prebiotic probiotic sibo small intestinal bacterial overgrowth wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Surfaceskins Excrete Alcohol on Every Push to Prevent Spread of In-Hospital Infections
Hospital acquired infections continue to be a major source of patient morbidities. Hand washing guidelines, ubiquitously available alcohol sanitizers, and keeping patients away from each other has helped reduce the spread of nosocomial infections. Nevertheless, much more needs to be done to prevent hospitals themselves from being vectors that spread infections that walk through their doors. A spin-off of the University of Leeds in the U.K., called Surfaceskins, has developed a textile material that releases alcohol onto its surface any time someone touches it. The technology has been implemented in the form of pushpads tha...
Source: Medgadget - October 10, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Critical Care Medicine Public Health Source Type: blogs

Glyphosate: not JUST a carcinogen
One of the most potentially harmful aspects of genetically-modified crops, or GMOs, are that such crops are often engineered to be resistant to an herbicide. A farmer therefore can spray the herbicide to kill weeds, while the GM crop plant survives. But it means that the plant now has herbicide residues in it. So GMO crops pose a double-whammy: the crop itself with new genetically-programmed components, especially proteins, coupled with an herbicide. Glyphosate is the most widely applied herbicide in the world, in part because GM corn and soy have been engineered to be glyphosate-resistant. So much glysphosate is being use...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - October 12, 2015 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle bowel flora gluten glyphosate gmo grains herbicide microbiota soy Source Type: blogs

Would you buy used makeup? Episode 103
Support the Beauty Brains by signing up for a free trail at Audible.com. Would you buy used makeup? Link Have you heard of this company, Glambot? It’s a startup company that is apparently sells a million dollars a year of pre-owned makeup. The company, which was founded in 2013 by CEO Karen Horiuchi, buys used makeup and resells it online. They clean and sanitize every product before resale. (They use heat or alcohol to sterilize containers or in some cases to “remove layers of product to get down to a fresh one.” Here are their guidelines: They only buy products on their “accepted brand” list which cover...
Source: thebeautybrains.com - October 6, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Randy SchuellerDiscover the beauty and cosmetic products you should use and avoid Source Type: blogs

Enterococcus faecalis
is a gram positive, catalase negative bacteria that is an increasing worry for clinicians as a cause of hospital-acquired infections. It is a normally occurring bacteria in the intestines, bile ducts, and genitourinary system. However, when there is local overgrowth due to other flora being suppressed (especially by cephalosporins) it causes clinically important urinary and biliary tract infections. Interestingly, Enterococcus faecalis has an outer capsule that prevents it from being degraded by bile salts. Of particular worry is the ability of Enterococcus faecalis to enter the bloodstrean and colonize heart valves in su...
Source: Inside Surgery - March 15, 2015 Category: Surgery Authors: Editor Tags: Infectious Disease cephalosporins enterococcus UTI vancomycin resistant Source Type: blogs

Healthcare Update Satellite — 09-15-2014
This study should be required reading in every emergency medicine residency in this country. In fact, the concepts in the studies should be tested on the emergency medicine board exams. Now if the study only compared the type of a patient’s insurance with the likelihood of emergency department recidivism. How else can the media try to tarnish this guy’s reputation? The doctor who oversaw Joan Rivers’ fatal endoscopy was once *sued* 10 years ago. Gasp. The former patient’s attorneys are really trying to create their 15 minutes of fame. They alleged that 10 years ago the patient received no informed ...
Source: WhiteCoat's Call Room - September 15, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: WhiteCoat Tags: Healthcare Update Source Type: blogs

Gowns and gloves in the ICU: Part of the infection control solution
It’s good to see health care providers continue to work on strategies to reduce health care acquired infections. Handwashing is a key component —but hospitals struggle to achieve compliance and are now turning to patients to be the bad cop, much to my dismay. A simple new strategy in intensive care units is showing promise: having doctors and nurses where gloves and gowns with all patients, not just those who are known to have antibiotic resistant bacteria. It takes more time and costs a bit of money, but seems to cut down dramatically on MRSA infections without generating adverse events. The study is important...
Source: Health Business Blog - October 8, 2013 Category: Health Managers Authors: dewe67 Tags: Research antibiotic resistant bacteria intensive care units MRSA infections Source Type: blogs