First Attempt Success Rates of Endotracheal IntubationsFirst Attempt Success Rates of Endotracheal Intubations
Find out about the factors associated with first-attempt success of emergency endotracheal intubation. Emergency Medicine Journal (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - December 4, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Emergency Medicine Journal Article Source Type: news

Video Laryngoscopy Improves Intubating SuccessVideo Laryngoscopy Improves Intubating Success
In fellowship training programs, urgent endotracheal intubation improves when a video laryngoscope is used. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - November 14, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pulmonary Medicine News Source Type: news

The Role of Videolaryngoscopy in Orotracheal IntubationThe Role of Videolaryngoscopy in Orotracheal Intubation
How effective are videolaryngoscopes in oral endotracheal intubation? BMC Anesthesiology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - April 15, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Anesthesiology Journal Article Source Type: news

Success With First-Pass Attempts of Endotracheal IntubationSuccess With First-Pass Attempts of Endotracheal Intubation
A retrospective and observational study looking at first-pass success of endotracheal intubation and the frequency of adverse events. American Academy of Emergency Medicine (Source: Medscape Emergency Medicine Headlines)
Source: Medscape Emergency Medicine Headlines - February 5, 2013 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Emergency Medicine Article Source Type: news

Nebulized naloxone in opiate intoxication
3.5 out of 5 stars Use and efficacy of nebulized naloxone in patients with suspected opioid intoxication. Baumann BM et al. Am J Emerg Med 2013 Jan 21.  [Epub ahead of print] Abstract The use of intravenous naloxone to reverse opiate effects is associated with many potential adverse events, some well-known and others not sufficiently recognized. Even relatively small doses of IV naloxone can cause acute withdrawal, severe agitation, and emesis. If the patient has another CNS depressant on board — such as ethanol — he may vomit but not be alert enough to protect the airway. In addition, acute withdrawal is sometimes ...
Source: The Poison Review - February 2, 2013 Category: Toxicology Authors: Leon Tags: Medical naloxone narcotic overdose nebulized opiate opioid Source Type: news