What ’s a diagnosis about? COVID-19 and beyond
By MICHEL ACCAD Last month marked the 400th anniversary of the birth of John Graunt, commonly regarded as the father of epidemiology.  His major published work, Natural and Political Observations Made upon the Bills of Mortality, called attention to the death statistics published weekly in London beginning in the late 16th century.  Graunt was skeptical of how causes of death were ascribed, especially in times of plagues.  Evidently, 400 years of scientific advances have done little to lessen his doubts!  A few days ago, Fox News reported that Colorado governor Jared Polis ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - May 28, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: COVID-19 Medical Practice Physicians Diagnosis MICHEL ACCAD Source Type: blogs

Corona times: Clinical cardiology gets up from graveyard, for a while !
Surprised to see many of my colleagues, physicians and fellows are beaming with a new pride even in this troubled corona times. Paradoxically, I could see some fresh clinical sense in their approach to problems as well. Each one of them had a story to tell. Sir, I could suddenly diagnose heart failure for the first time with my eyes and ears without NT- Pro BNP or E/E’ . I agree with you sir, textbooks seem to be right. There was indeed basal rales and JVP was elevated. I was astonished I could diagnose CHF clinically! Suddenly, I found, I have acquired the rare expertise of giving fitness to an emergency appendect...
Source: Dr.S.Venkatesan MD - May 18, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: dr s venkatesan Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Corona times: Clinical cardiology wakes up from deep coma, for a while !
Surprised to see many of my colleagues, physicians and fellows are beaming with new pride even in this troubled corona times. Paradoxically, I could see some fresh clinical sense in their approach to problems as well. Each one of them had a story to tell Sir, I could suddenly diagnose heart failure for the first time with my eyes and ears without NT- Pro BNP or E/E’ . I agree with you sir, textbooks seem to be right. There was indeed basal rales and JVP was elevated. I was astonished I could diagnose CHF clinically! I feel proud, that I have acquired the rare expertise of giving fitness to an emergency appendectomy...
Source: Dr.S.Venkatesan MD - May 18, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: dr s venkatesan Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

It is OK to be scared, but it is not OK to let our own anxieties harm our patients
“Our current guidelines from the hospital and our national societies are if the patient is not at risk for a major cardiac event in the next week we should defer surgery.”  The words hang in the now virtual air of the hospital’s weekly multidisciplinary endocarditis conference.  The young wo man whose case we are discussing has […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 28, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/sami-el-dalati" rel="tag" > Sami El-Dalati, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Conditions Cardiology COVID-19 coronavirus Infectious Disease Source Type: blogs

Tender lesion in endocarditis – MCQ – Answer
Tender lesion in endocarditis – MCQ – Answer Which of these lesions in endocarditis are tender? – Correct answer: a) Osler nodes Osler nodes are small tender lesions noted in the pads of fingers and toes. They are caused by infected microemboli. Janeway lesions are slightly elevated, non tender hemorrhagic lesions on the palms and soles. Splinter hemorrhages are linear hemorrhages seen on the nail beds. Back to question (Source: Cardiophile MD)
Source: Cardiophile MD - March 27, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis Tags: Medicine MCQ - CVS Source Type: blogs

Tender lesion in endocarditis – MCQ
Tender lesion in endocarditis – MCQ Which of these lesions in endocarditis are tender? a) Osler nodes b) Janeway lesions c) Splinter hemorrhages d) All of the above Post your answer as a comment below (Source: Cardiophile MD)
Source: Cardiophile MD - March 26, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis Tags: Medicine MCQ - CVS Source Type: blogs

Do patients addicted to drugs truly have capacity?
Is it time to rethink how we determine the capacity of our patients who are addicted to drugs?   I recently began debating this question after I took care of a young woman with endocarditis.  She had a long history of IV drug abuse that had led to the development of endocarditis.  She had been admitted […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 4, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/gregory-jasani" rel="tag" > Gregory Jasani, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Conditions Emergency Medicine Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

A 40-something with chest pain. Is this inferior MI?
This was sent by a Saleh Hatem, an avid reader of the blog.The patient presented with chest pain:There is a narrow complex tachycardia.Is there inferior ST Elevation?Here was my interpretation:What appears to be ST Elevation in inferior leads is really a P-wave that is contiguous with the QRS. (The next bump over is a T-wave that looks like a P-wave!).Since the P-wave is not inverted, it is NOT retrograde, and therefore it is a native sinus beat.  This sinus beat does conduct, but there is severely prolonged PR interval (severe first degree AV block), with a PR interval of over 400 ms.So: Sinus tachycardia with severe...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - March 4, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

Pricardial effusion associated with Infective Endocarditis : Incidence , mechansim and clinical Implication.
Pericardial effusion is often detected in patients with Infective endocarditis. Incidence can be as high as 25% . Most often it is mild, can be moderate in few. Mechanism Sympathetic effusion in response to endocardial infection. It’s never more than minimal. (Evidence ? it’s only an assumption) IE related cardiac failure (Raised systemic venous pressure to which pericardial veins drain) Local sepsis, Abcess formation tracks to pericardial space through transmural lymphatics Fungal , granulomatous , Tuberculous IE (Rare) Here IE and PE  share the same pathology Part of systemic sepsis activated Immun...
Source: Dr.S.Venkatesan MD - January 28, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: dr s venkatesan Tags: cardiology -Therapeutics Cardiology -unresolved questions Infrequently asked questions in cardiology (iFAQs) pericardial disease pericardial effusion Pericardium infective endocarditis pericardial effusion in infective endocarditis Source Type: blogs

Pericardial effusion associated with Infective Endocarditis : Incidence , mechansim and clinical Implication.
Pericardial effusion is often detected in patients with Infective endocarditis. Incidence can be as high as 25% . Most often it is mild, can be moderate in few. Mechanism Sympathetic effusion in response to endocardial infection. It’s never more than minimal. (Evidence ? it’s only an assumption) IE related cardiac failure (Raised systemic venous pressure to which pericardial veins drain) Local sepsis, Abcess formation tracks to pericardial space through transmural lymphatics Fungal , granulomatous , Tuberculous IE (Rare) Here IE and PE  share the same pathology Part of systemic sepsis activated Immun...
Source: Dr.S.Venkatesan MD - January 28, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: dr s venkatesan Tags: cardiology -Therapeutics Cardiology -unresolved questions Infrequently asked questions in cardiology (iFAQs) pericardial disease pericardial effusion Pericardium infective endocarditis pericardial effusion in infective endocarditis Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, December 16th 2019
This study shows that CA are released from periventricular and subpial regions to the cerebrospinal fluid and are present in the cervical lymph nodes, into which cerebrospinal fluid drains through the meningeal lymphatic system. We also show that CA can be phagocytosed by macrophages. We conclude that CA can act as containers that remove waste products from the brain and may be involved in a mechanism that cleans the brain. Moreover, we postulate that CA may contribute in some autoimmune brain diseases, exporting brain substances that interact with the immune system, and hypothesize that CA may contain brain markers that m...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 15, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Cancer Survivors have Double the Risk of Suffering a Later Stroke
We present a contemporary analysis of risk of fatal stroke among more than 7.5 million cancer patients and report that stroke risk varies as a function of disease site, age, gender, marital status, and time after diagnosis. The risk of stroke among cancer patients is two times that of the general population and rises with longer follow-up time. The relative risk of fatal stroke, versus the general population, is highest in those with cancers of the brain and gastrointestinal tract. The plurality of strokes occurs in patients older than 40 years of age with cancers of the prostate, breast, and colorectum. Patients of any ag...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 9, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Evacuating the Nefarious Subungual Hematomas
​Subungual hematomas can be a terror. They are painful, ugly-looking, nefarious, and sometimes confusing. The ultimate goal is to drain the accumulated blood and relieve the painful pressure.The best intervention is easy and straightforward: Leave the nail in place, and evacuate the blood under it. (Hand Surg. 2012;17[1]:151; Am J Emerg Med. 2006;24[7]:875; Emerg Med J. 2003;20[1]:65, http://bit.ly/2mHV1cO.) Then, provide excellent discharge information without prescribing antibiotics.A subungual hematoma in a 21-year-old man who slammed his thumb in a car door about 12 hours before ED arrival. Photo by M. Roberts.Distal...
Source: The Procedural Pause - November 1, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Even Low Levels of Infection Can Cause Cardiac Dysfunction in Older Individuals
We examined how mycobacterial infection and inflammaging catalyze the decline in cardiovascular function in the elderly. Young (3 months) and old (18 month) female C57BL/6 mice were infected with a sub-lethal dose of Mycobacterium avium (M. avium), an NTM. We observed no differences in the M. avium bacterial numbers in the lung, liver, or spleen between young and old M. avium infected mice. However, through the course of M. avium infection, old mice developed severe dysrhythmia and developed pericarditis. Moreover, the hearts of M. avium infected old mice had increased cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis, expression of pro-infla...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 9, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, July 15th 2019
In conclusion, we show here that sEVs are responsible for mediating paracrine senescence and speculate that they could be involved in inducing bystander senescence during therapy-induced senescence or aging. In fact, when compared to soluble factors, sEVs have different biophysical and biochemical properties as they have a longer lifespan than do soluble factors and they are more resistant to protease degradation. The idea that blocking sEV secretion could be a potential therapeutic approach to alleviate senescence "spreading" during chemotherapy-induced senescence or in aging tissues presents itself as a very at...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 15, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Applying Bacterial Homing Strategies to Target Stem Cells to Heart Tissue
Most classes of therapy benefit from some form of targeting or selectivity, helping to direct them to the tissue of interest, and away from other places where they might cause side-effects. Cells are difficult to work with, but they are also much more capable of selective targeting, since they can migrate. Many types of cell reliably find their way from one part of the body to another in the course of their functions, but where no suitable mechanism exists in human biochemistry, it is sometimes possible to look elsewhere. Here, researchers adapt a bacterial targeting system and apply it to the stem cells that might be used...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 10, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Artificial Bacterial Protein Allows Stem Cells to Home to the Heart
Researchers at the University of Bristol have developed a way to make stem cells move toward heart tissue when they are injected intravenously. The treatment could improve the efficacy of stem cell therapies for heart disease, which are currently hampered when most injected cells are filtered out of circulation by organs such as the lungs and spleen. Stem cell therapies have enormous promise for regenerative medicine, including treatments to heal damaged cardiac tissue. However, so far, simply injecting cells intravenously or even into the heart tissue itself hasn’t worked all that well. Stem cells tend to be remo...
Source: Medgadget - July 8, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Cardiac Surgery Cardiology Genetics Rehab Source Type: blogs

Benjamin Sacks
(1896 - 1971) was an American physician. 1924 - Along with Emanuel Libman defined atypical verrucous valvular lesions in patients with SLE (Libman–Sacks endocarditis) The post Benjamin Sacks appeared first on Life in the Fast Lane • LITFL • Medical Blog. (Source: Life in the Fast Lane)
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - January 31, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Gary Zhang Tags: Cardiology Eponym Benjamin Sacks Libman-Sacks endocarditis Source Type: blogs

Medicine MCQ Test Series 1
This Medicine MCQ Test Series contains 20 questions which can be attempted over 40 seconds each. After submission, answers and discussion will be displayed. Medicine MCQ Test Series 1 Time limit: 0 Quiz-summary 0 of 20 questions completed Questions: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Information ...
Source: Cardiophile MD - January 27, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis Tags: Medicine MCQ - CVS Source Type: blogs

Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 261
Just when you thought your brain could unwind on a Friday! Time to GUESS THE DISEASE challenge for Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 261 The post Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 261 appeared first on Life in the Fast Lane. (Source: Life in the Fast Lane)
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - November 30, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neil Long Tags: FFFF antiphospholipid syndrome APS Benjamin Sacks Catastrophic APS Cyclophosphamide Emanuel Libman endocarditis Glucocorticoids IVIG Libman-Sacks endocarditis Livedo reticularis plasma exchange Salmonella shrinking lung syndrom Source Type: blogs

Thoughts on a 23-year-old athlete dying from the Lemierre Syndrome
K-State football team to honor rower Samantha Scott, who died of Lemierre’s Syndrome  Every time I read such a story my heart breaks, a small piece each time. More physicians have become aware of the Lemierre syndrome. We must also educate patients and families that sore throats in adolescents and young adults can become life threatening. Why did she die?  The article does not have enough detail to develop a firm conclusion.  I can speculate on several reasons from multiple discussions with both survivors and families of adolescents who died.  We also have some unpublished survey data that informs...
Source: DB's Medical Rants - November 3, 2018 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: rcentor Tags: Medical Rants Source Type: blogs

Is cardiac valves really (a)vascular structures ?
Though heart is known primarily as a pump, it is the four cardiac valves that ensures the critical , non-stop unidirectional flow that sustain the circulation . It is to be recalled these valves originate in the very early days of cardiac development when the primitive heart tube loops , even as the chambers expand from primitive ventricle. Mesenchymal differentiation controlled by various genes that cleaves the valve from myocardial tissue. While heart by itself is the supreme vascular organ ,  its surprising  few structures inside the heart , like the valves are quiet avascular ( or is it really so ?)...
Source: Dr.S.Venkatesan MD - October 18, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: dr s venkatesan Tags: cardiac embryology Embryology : Heart valve development Infective endocarditis : Pathology valvular heart disease blood supply to heart valves hematogenous spread of infective endocarditis how bacteria reach mitral valve in infective endocardi Source Type: blogs

Music is creating beauty in the most surprising of places
“Good morning, Mr. S! How are you feeling today?” I ask as I step into his hospital room. Yesterday, Mr. S was admitted for infective endocarditis and has been tolerating antibiotic treatment well. I am a medical student on my acute cardiology rotation taking care of him. “I’m feeling fine,” he says, and I proceed to ask about how he slept, if he’s experiencing any chest pain, palpitations, shortness of breath, abdominal pain, or problems going to the bathroom. He seems to have all these answers memorized, saying no to my questions. I perform a physical exam and decide that he is doing a...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 11, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/glenna-wong" rel="tag" > Glenna Wong < /a > Tags: Education Cardiology Hospital-Based Medicine Source Type: blogs

It ’s time for hospitalists to be engaged with opioid use disorders
Alvin is a 42-year-old man who was never really given a chance. His parents both had severe alcohol use disorder. At age 12, his parents encouraged him to skip school to sell marijuana in order to fund their drinking. As his parents began using various illicit drugs, Alvin started selling larger amounts of marijuana to foot their bill. Eventually, marijuana was not profitable enough. Alvin, then 16 years old, turned to crack cocaine. A year later, he was arrested with enough drugs in his possession to justify a criminal charge for dealing. Alvin spent the next 20 years in and out of prison. He had never been in a physical ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 5, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/rich-bottner" rel="tag" > Rich Bottner, PA-C < /a > Tags: Conditions Hospital-Based Medicine Hospitalist Source Type: blogs

Fever with polyarthralgia – Medicine MCQ – CVS – Answer
Fever with polyarthralgia – Medicine MCQ – CVS – Answer Medicine MCQs – CVS: on Amazon Kindle Store Person presents with fever of 2 weeks and polyarthralgia. Which of the following findings will you specifically look for in the hands: Correct answer: c) Splinter hemorrhages From the point of view of cardiovascular system, prolonged fever with polyarthralgia could be a manifestation of infective endocarditis. Rheumatic fever seldom presents as prolonged fever. Striking manifestation is usually polyarthritis in rheumatic fever. Heberden’s nodes are seen in osteoarthritis. Cyanosis has...
Source: Cardiophile MD - September 4, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

LITFL Review 342
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 342nd LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chunk of FOAM. Readers can subscribe to LITFL review RSS or LITFL review EMAIL subscription The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week A wonderf...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - July 29, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marjorie Lazoff, MD Tags: LITFL review LITFL R/V Source Type: blogs

Tropical Travel Trouble 011 Tonsillitis and the Bull
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog aka Tropical Travel Trouble 011 Peer Reviewers: Dr Jennifer Ho, ID physician QLD, Australia and Dr Mark Little, ED physician QLD, Australia. You are working in far North Queensland and encounter a 20 year old Indigenous man with tonsillitis on your ED short stay ward round. He has been receiving IV penicillin and metronidazole overnight but is deteriorating and now cannot open his mouth beyond 1.5cm, and has a swollen neck (some might say ‘Bull neck&r...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - July 25, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Amanda McConnell Tags: Clinical Cases Tropical Medicine antitoxin bull neck c. diphtheriae c.ulcerans DAT pseudomembrane vaccine Source Type: blogs

Tropical Travel Trouble 011 Tonsillitis and the Bull
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog aka Tropical Travel Trouble 011 Peer Reviewers: Dr Jennifer Ho, ID physician QLD, Australia and Dr Mark Little, ED physician QLD, Australia. You are working in far North Queensland and encounter a 20 year old Indigenous man with tonsillitis on your ED short stay ward round. He has been receiving IV penicillin and metronidazole overnight but is deteriorating and now cannot open his mouth beyond 1.5cm, and has a swollen neck (some might say ‘Bull neck&r...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - July 25, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Amanda McConnell Tags: Clinical Cases Tropical Medicine antitoxin bull neck c. diphtheriae c.ulcerans DAT pseudomembrane vaccine Source Type: blogs

Acute severe AR – Cardiology MCQ – Answer
Most common cause of acute severe aortic regurgitation: Correct answer: b) Infective endocarditis Though acute rheumatic fever can produce aortic regurgitation, usually mitral regurgitation is the dominant lesion in acute rheumatic carditis. Aortic dissection can cause acute aortic regurgitation if the dissection flap reaches the level of the aortic valve. Myocardial infarction can cause acute mitral regurgitation if a papillary muscle is severely ischemic or ruptures, but not aortic regurgitation. Most common cause of chronic aortic regurgitation in the Western world is degenerative disease of bicuspid or trileaflet ...
Source: Cardiophile MD - June 14, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis, MD, DM, FACC, FRCP Edin, FRCP London Tags: Cardiology MCQ DM / DNB Cardiology Entrance Source Type: blogs

Acute severe AR – Cardiology MCQ
Most common cause of acute severe aortic regurgitation: a) Aortic dissection b) Infective endocarditis c) Rheumatic fever d) Myocardial infarction Please post your answer as a comment below. Correct answer will be published on: Jun 14, 2018 @ 13:32 (Source: Cardiophile MD)
Source: Cardiophile MD - June 12, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis, MD, DM, FACC, FRCP Edin, FRCP London Tags: Cardiology MCQ DM / DNB Cardiology Entrance Source Type: blogs

Loeffler endocarditis
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - June 10, 2018 Category: Internal Medicine Tags: cardiovascular Source Type: blogs

What are the sites of vegetations in VSD with endocarditis?
Locations of vegetations in endocarditis depends on direction of the blood flow jet which causes jet lesions at the site which it impinges, causing damage to the endothelium. It is at this region that small thrombi can form and become a nidus for vegetations. In ventricular septal defect (VSD), there is a left to right jet from the left ventricle to right ventricle. The smaller the size of the VSD, higher the pressure gradient between the two ventricles and greater the velocity of the jet and chance for jet lesion. For the same reason, endocarditis is more common in small VSD and rare in large VSD. When there is a jet, th...
Source: Cardiophile MD - May 25, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis, MD, DM, FACC, FRCP Edin, FRCP London Tags: General Cardiology Source Type: blogs

Etiological types of prosthetic valve dysfunction
Prosthetic valve thrombosis Pannus formation – growth of fibrotic tissue from the annulus region into the prosthetic valve, hindering proper movement of the valve leaflets Degeneration of the bioprosthetic valve Prosthetic valve endocarditis formation of vegetation which hinder proper valve function The post Etiological types of prosthetic valve dysfunction appeared first on Cardiophile MD. (Source: Cardiophile MD)
Source: Cardiophile MD - May 24, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis, MD, DM, FACC, FRCP Edin, FRCP London Tags: General Cardiology Source Type: blogs

The unscientific lure of antibiotics
Although my father did not discover penicillin, he helped do the research showing its effectiveness in curing infective endocarditis. As an internist, he then became enamored with the role antibiotics could play in treating infections. Growing up, my siblings and I can attest to his unbridled enthusiasm, as every time we contracted a cold, we would get a shot of the wonder mold in our butts. The fact that colds were caused by viruses and not bacteria did little to dissuade him from the utility of the treatment. When I finally developed a rash after another shot, I celebrated the fact that the painful solution would never e...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 22, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/david-mokotoff" rel="tag" > David Mokotoff, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Infectious Disease Primary Care Source Type: blogs

Stop shaming those with addiction
He was younger than I was — still in his twenties — but the patient had already had his chest opened twice. Deadly bloodstream infections contracted from sharing needles had destroyed his heart valves on two separate occasions. And now six months out from his most recent operation, he was back with fever and chills: ominous signs of another infection. That was years ago. The opioid epidemic hadn’t yet been declared a public health emergency. I had just begun my training in cardiology, and he was the first such patient that I had ever taken care of. In the ensuing years, there would be many more like him: ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 19, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/akshay-pendyal" rel="tag" > Akshay Pendyal, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Emergency Medicine Primary Care Source Type: blogs

Lake Louise criteria – Cardiology MCQ
Lake Louise criteria is for the diagnosis of: a) Myocardial infarction on echocardiography b) Endocarditis on blood culture c) Myocarditis on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging d) None of the above Please post your answer as a comment below. Correct answer will be published on: May 19, 2018 @ 18:18 The post Lake Louise criteria – Cardiology MCQ appeared first on Cardiophile MD. (Source: Cardiophile MD)
Source: Cardiophile MD - May 17, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis, MD, DM, FACC, FRCP Edin, FRCP London Tags: Cardiology MCQ DM / DNB Cardiology Entrance Source Type: blogs

LITFL Review 331
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 331st LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chunk of FOAM. Readers can subscribe to LITFL review RSS or LITFL review EMAIL subscription The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week One of th...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - May 14, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marjorie Lazoff, MD Tags: LITFL review LITFL R/V Source Type: blogs

LITFL Review 315
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 315th LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chunk of FOAM. The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week Rob Macsweeney of Critical Care Reviews posts the 2 hour livestream of the ADRENAL...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - January 22, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marjorie Lazoff, MD Tags: Education LITFL review Source Type: blogs

Risk factors which can affect the outcome of CABG
(Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting) Age and gender: advanced age and female gender have less favourable outcome. Previous cardiovascular events: prior cardiovascular surgery, interventions, myocardial infarction, stroke or transient ischemic attacks. Cardiovascular variables: left ventricular function, hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias. Diabetes mellitus, chronic renal disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Complexity of disease: number of vessels involved, severity of associated valvular stenosis or regurgitation and endocarditis if any. Hemodynamic status and urgency of surgery. Pulmonary hypertensi...
Source: Cardiophile MD - January 6, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis, MD, DM, FACC, FRCP Edin, FRCP London Tags: Cardiac Surgery Source Type: blogs

The challenge of “ evidence based ” sore throat guidelines
In 2007, Matthys and colleagues published a classic article: Differences Among International Pharyngitis Guidelines: Not Just Academic Jan Matthys, Marc De Meyere, Mieke L. van Driel, An De Sutter Ann Fam Med. 2007 Sep; 5(5): 436–443. doi: 10.1370/afm.741 PMCID: PMC2000301 RESULTS We included 4 North American and 6 European guidelines. Recommendations differ with regard to the use of a rapid antigen test and throat culture and with the indication for antibiotics. The North American, French, and Finnish guidelines consider diagnosis of group A streptococcus essential, and prevention o...
Source: DB's Medical Rants - October 23, 2017 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: rcentor Tags: Medical Rants Source Type: blogs

LITFL Review 302
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 302nd LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chunk of FOAM. The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week The ALIEM AIR Series delivers another amazing collation of the best resources in FO...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - October 16, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marjorie Lazoff, MD Tags: Education LITFL review Source Type: blogs

Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 204
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Just when you thought your brain could unwind on a Friday, you realise that it would rather be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF…introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 204. Question 1 Richard Doll published an epidemiology paper in 1950. What had he discovered? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer expand(document.getElementById('ddet1398470481'));expand(document.getElementById('ddetlink1398470481')) The link between smoking a...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - September 8, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neil Long Tags: Frivolous Friday Five addison's disease bubo bubonic plague cancer endocarditis JF Kennedy Libman Sacks moritz roth richard doll roth spots SLE smoking Source Type: blogs

7 ways to combat compassion fatigue
This is the patient’s eight admission over the course of two weeks. The patient is a heroin abuser and has bacteremia and endocarditis. Their heart valve is failing and they are in and out of congestive heart failure. Every day, dozens of medical professionals converge on the patient to give treatment and advice. And every day after hearing that advice, the patient leaves the hospital against medical advice and goes to use IV drugs. They wind up back in the hospital out of fear or panic, or they are brought back in after overdosing by the police. The cycle continues. In this common daily scenario, it is very easy as ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 18, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/jenny-hartsock" rel="tag" > Jenny Hartsock, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Cardiology Hospital-Based Medicine Infectious Disease Primary Care Source Type: blogs

What it ’s like to be a doctor in the heroin capitol of the U.S.
I am a practicing hospitalist physician in Dayton, Ohio. Dayton has emerged in the last year as the city with the highest per capita death rate from opioid overdoses. When we measure the number of deaths here we talk about how many there are per day, not per week or month. We have been inundated with heroin and other products laced with fentanyl or carfentanil. Every other drug, including marijuana, is laced with an opiate in this city. Dealers stand on street corners and throw baggies of heroin into passing cars who have the windows open — free of charge — to get new customers hooked. A routine dose of Narcan ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 19, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/jenny-hartsock" rel="tag" > Jenny Hartsock, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Medications Source Type: blogs

Hours out of the OR for valve replacement surgery: patient with paced rhythm becomes hemodynamically unstable
Conclusions: ACO in VPR is an uncommon condition. The MSC showed good Sens for diagnosis of ACO in the presence of VPR, especially among patients with high peak cTn, and Spec was excellent. These methods and results are consistent with studies that have used the MSC to diagnose ACO in LBBB. (Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog)
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - May 19, 2017 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

Small muscular ventricular septal defect – echocardiogram
Echocardiogram in apical 5 chamber view shows the mosaic colour jet of a small ventricular septal defect (VSD) near the apex. The cardiac chambers are not dilated. The small defect is difficult to see on two dimensional echocardiography, though it is easily detected clinically with a pan systolic murmur and Doppler echo documents the high velocity jet across the VSD. LV: Left ventricle; RV: right ventricle; Ao: Aorta; LA: Left ventricle; Pulm vein: Pulmonary vein. Continuous wave (CW) Doppler interrogation shows the inter-ventricular pressure gradient as 81 mm Hg, which is consistent with a restrictive VSD. Small muscular...
Source: Cardiophile MD - December 11, 2016 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis, MD, DM, FACC, FRCP Edin, FRCP London Tags: Cardiology Echocardiogram Library Echocardiography Source Type: blogs

MKSAP: 47-year-old man with a bicuspid aortic valve
Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 47-year-old man is evaluated during a routine examination. He has no symptoms. Medical history is significant for a bicuspid aortic valve. He is not taking any medications. On physical examination, he is afebrile, blood pressure is 130/70 mm Hg, pulse rate is 56/min, and respiration rate is 15/min. Cardiac examination reveals a grade 1/6 diastolic murmur at the left lower sternal border. Echocardiogram shows a bicuspid aortic valve with moderate aortic regurgitation, normal left ventricular systolic fu...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - December 3, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/mksap" rel="tag" > mksap < /a > Tags: Conditions Heart Source Type: blogs

12 Percent of People Will Be Diagnosed With This Life-Threatening Heart Disease
The post below first appeared on HuffPost Healthy Living on April 20. Jen Hyde, a 30-year-old poet and artist living in Brooklyn, has a congenital heart defect. By the age of 25, Hyde had two open-heart surgeries, including a heart valve replacement. “I know that heart disease is the number one killer of women in America,” Hyde said. “I’m currently in great shape, but part of staying this way means building a strong relationship with my cardiologist so that the care I receive is preventative, not reactive.” Hyde is not alone in suffering from heart health issues — in the U.S., cardiova...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - April 25, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Chronic Conditions Source Type: blogs