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What Is Hispanic Heritage Month?
Hispanic Heritage Month is an official celebration of American citizens whose ancestry can be traced back to Spain, Mexico, Central and South America and the Caribbean. When is Hispanic Heritage Month? The festival now lasts from September 15 to October 15 every year, but it first started out as just a week long celebration of in 1968. Twenty years later, in 1988 it expanded to dedicate a whole four weeks for the celebration of being Hispanic. The celebration starts in the middle of the month, as opposed to the end, because the 15th marks the independence days of five Latin America countries: Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guate...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rachel Lewis Tags: Uncategorized hispanic heritage month onetime Smithsonian Source Type: news

A Jailed Janitor Has Become Emblematic of President Trump ’s Immigration Sweep
(BOSTON) — Francisco Rodriguez-Guardado’s first son was born just days after he was taken into custody by federal immigration officials for deportation back to his native El Salvador. He has yet to meet his son but is told there’s a resemblance. “They tell me he has my eyes,” the 43-year-old said with a mix of wistfulness and pride this month in an interview at the Suffolk County House of Corrections. Rodriguez-Guardado, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology janitor whose case became a rallying cry for local opponents of President Donald Trump’s immigration crackdown this summer, await...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Philip Marcelo / AP Tags: Uncategorized Immigration Massachusetts onetime Source Type: news

Frontline Stories: Risks Faced by Health Workers
Overseas Development Institute. 08/17/2017 This 55-minute panel discussion focuses on the risks health workers face when responding to crises, and what needs to be done in the future to better protect them. From armed conflicts to health epidemics, many frontline health workers operate in harsh environments which come at a high cost to their physical and psychological well-being. Stories include examples from the Ebola outbreak, and conflicts in Syria and El Salvador. (Video or Multimedia) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - August 28, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Teen pregnancies, and attendant health risks, a major concern in El Salvador
Language UndefinedAHUACHAP ÁN, El Salvador –“I could have died the day my son was born,” said Evelyn*, who became pregnant when she was only 13. Her pregnancy was complicated, and she spent most of the time bedridden and in constant discomfort.During her pregnancy, Evelyn had a variety of severe complications, including gestational diabetes and preeclampsia. “Our lives were in danger the four times,” the young woman, said about herself and her son. (Source: UNFPA News)
Source: UNFPA News - August 3, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: zerzan Source Type: news

Gun violence in Chicago - Garbarino J.
This extended editorial is a discussion of urban gun violence (hypersensitivity to threat, preemptive and retaliatory violence, drug and gang turf conflists) in contrast with gun violence in the country of El Salvador -- a nation with one of the highest pe... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - July 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Commentary Source Type: news

After being raped and impregnated, El Salvadorian 19-year-old sentenced to 30 years in prison for having an abortion
(Natural News) A court in El Salvador has recently sentenced a 19-year-old rape survivor to 30 years in prison after suffering a still birth due to pregnancy complications. The rape survivor, Evelyn Beatriz Hernandez Cruz, was charged with aggravated homicide under the country’s anti-abortion law. As per local reports, Hernandez Cruz was convicted on grounds of failing... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - July 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Doctors Without Borders Statement on Conference on Prosperity and Security in Central America
Press releaseDoctors Without Borders Statement on Conference on Prosperity and Security in Central AmericaJune 15, 2017This week in Miami, the United States and Mexico are co-hosting a high-level Conference on Prosperity and Security in Central America to address some of the issues driving mass migration from El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras, also known as the Northern Triangle of Central America. (Source: MSF News)
Source: MSF News - June 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Jess Brown Source Type: news

Home-based HPV tests may help with cervical cancer screening
(Wiley) A new study found that for many women in rural El Salvador, home-based HPV self-sampling for women is an acceptable way to participate in a cervical cancer screening program. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Forced to Flee Central America's Northern Triangle: A Neglected Humanitarian Crisis
Doctors Without Borders/Medecins Sans Frontieres. 05/11/2017 This 32-page report details the massive forced migration flow into Mexico from El Salvador, Honduras, and Guatemala, known as the Northern Triangle of Central America (NTCA). The findings of this report are based on violence assessment surveys and medical and psychosocial consultations, and reveal a pattern of violent displacement, persecution, sexual violence, and forced repatriation. Chapter topics include Caring for Refugees and Migrants, Barriers to Health Care, and Access to Protection in Mexico and the United States. (PDF) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Gu...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - May 23, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Report: Forced to Flee Central America's Northern Triangle: A Neglected Humanitarian Crisis
Special reportReport: Forced to Flee Central America's Northern Triangle: A Neglected Humanitarian CrisisMay 10, 2017Executive SummaryAn estimated 500,000 people cross into Mexico every year[1]. The majority making up this massive forced migration flow originate from El Salvador, Honduras, and Guatemala, known as the Northern Triangle of Central America (NTCA), one of the most violent regions in the world today. (Source: MSF News)
Source: MSF News - May 10, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Jess Brown Source Type: news

Emergency ZIKV (Zika Virus Disease): Results of the Consultation Process Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices (KAP) on ZIKV; Country Report: El Salvador
The objective of the survey is to determine the knowledge, beliefs, behaviors, and practices of people (adults and adolescents, women, and men) on the Zika virus. It found that more than 80 percent of respondents believe that it is possible to get Zika virus in their community, although three-quarters of respondents did not know someone in their community who had contracted Zika recently. (PDF) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - May 2, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

A spatio-temporal analysis of suicide in El Salvador - Carcach C.
BACKGROUND: In 2012, international statistics showed El Salvador's suicide rate as 40th in the world and the highest in Latin America. Over the last 15  years, national statistics show the suicide death rate declining as opposed to an increasing rate of ho... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 26, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Research Methods, Surveillance and Codes, Models Source Type: news

HC3 (Health Communication Capacity Collaborative) Landscaping Summary Report on Zika Coordination and Communication in Four Countries: Honduras, El Salvador, Dominican Republic and Guatemala
U.S. Agency for International Development. 06/09/2016 This 28-page report, published by the USAID-funded Health Communication Capacity Collaborative (HC3), summarizes a social and behavior change communication (SBCC) landscape for Zika in March and April, 2016, in four Central American countries: Honduras, El Salvador, Dominican Republic, and Guatemala. Visits to these countries were made to quickly take the pulse of the Zika situation and the local response. The report includes concrete recommendations for USAID to consider as it formulates its strategy to support neighbors to the south in continuing to combat and prevent...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - March 3, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

This Is What Obamacare's Critics Won't Admit Or Simply Don't Understand
THOUSAND OAKS, California ― Maryann Hammers is likely to die from ovarian cancer someday. But she hopes someday won’t come anytime soon. Hammers, 61, received the diagnosis in late 2013, and doctors told her that it was stage 3-C, which meant that she could live for many years with the right treatment and a little luck. So far, she’s had both. She’s in remission for the second time, and her last course of chemotherapy ended a year and a half ago. But recent blood tests detected elevated levels of a protein associated with tumors, she explained when we met a few weeks ago. “Maybe it’s a fluk...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Zika Appears To Affect Women More Than Men
By Julie SteenhuysenCHICAGO (Reuters) - Adult women in Puerto Rico were significantly more likely to develop Zika than men, researchers said on Thursday, raising new questions about the potential role of sexual transmission of the virus from males to females. The study, published in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s weekly report on death and disease, evaluated more than 29,000 laboratory-confirmed cases of Zika since the outbreak began in Puerto Rico in November 2015. The data show that of all Zika cases with laboratory evidence of infection, 62 percent were female. The results pattern similar ob...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 10, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Zika Appears To Affect Women More Than Men
By Julie SteenhuysenCHICAGO (Reuters) - Adult women in Puerto Rico were significantly more likely to develop Zika than men, researchers said on Thursday, raising new questions about the potential role of sexual transmission of the virus from males to females. The study, published in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s weekly report on death and disease, evaluated more than 29,000 laboratory-confirmed cases of Zika since the outbreak began in Puerto Rico in November 2015. The data show that of all Zika cases with laboratory evidence of infection, 62 percent were female. The results pattern similar ob...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 10, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Can urban greenspace have on an effect on children's behaviour?
In increasingly urbanised environments, there ’s some evidence to suggest that dedicated greenspace might have a beneficial impact on childhood aggression and depressionMarianito sat in the clinic office looking downcast. He ’d been referred to me in the primary care clinic because of fights at school. Despite complaints from the school about aggression, to me, a child and adolescent psychiatrist, he presented as a soft spoken and quiet 12-year-old of Salvadorean parents. After telling me a little about his favorite v ideo games, he told me that some of the kids at school “have been messing with me”...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 28, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Justine Larson Tags: Science Psychology Psychiatry Depression Source Type: news

Senseless violence against Central American unaccompanied minors: historical background and call for help - Sawyer CB, M árquez J.
The southwestern U.S. border has recently seen a significant increase in the number of unaccompanied children from Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador illegally crossing the Mexican border into the United States. Many of these children leave home to flee ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 10, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Who ’s Your Inspiration? Talking with David Benton about Some Memorable Nurses
May 12, 2010David Benton is CEO of theInternational Council of Nurses, a federation of more than 130 national nurses ’ associations representing millions of nurses worldwide. While he was here to speak at IntraHealth’s30th anniversary celebration, I had the chance to ask him a few questions. On International Nurses ’ Day, I’d like to share his examples of a few nurses who particularly inspired him.Why he decided to become a nurse“My first degree is in engineering […] but I knew that wasn’t what I wanted to do. My father had multiple sclerosis and was hospitalized; having completed...
Source: IntraHealth International - September 27, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Anonymous Source Type: news

Study Finds Strong Link Between Zika And Guillain-Barre Syndrome
A comparison of rates of Guillain-Barre syndrome before and after Zika arrived in seven countries has found a strong association between the virus and the illness, researchers from the Pan American Health Organization said on Wednesday. The current Zika outbreak was first detected in Brazil last year and has since spread across the Americas and the Caribbean. Pregnant women are considered to be at greatest risk because the virus can cause severe birth defects, including microcephaly, which is marked by small head size and underdeveloped brains. In Brazil, Zika has been linked to more than 1,800 cases of microcephaly. The f...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Youth violence and citized security in Central America's Northern Triangle - Williams RJ.
Honduras, El Salvador, and Guatemala, collectively known as the “Northern Triangle” of Central America have consistently been ranked in the top five most violent countries in the world as defined by the per-capita intentional homicide rate. Honduras ha... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 31, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Stryker ’ s Sage Products expands med wipes recall over B. cepacia contamination concerns
Stryker‘s (NYSE:SYK) Sage Products subsidiary is expanding its voluntary worldwide recall to include lots of impregnated cloth topical skin products over contamination issues with the bacteria Burkholderia cepacia, according to an FDA notice. The recall includes Sage Products’ Comfort Shield barrier cloths, incontinence clean-up cloths, M-care meatal cleansing cloths, Comfort Bath cleansing washcloths and .2% chlorhexidine gluconate cloths. Use of the products contaminated with B. cepacia could cause serious infections in patients with compromised immune systems or in hospitalized patients which could be life t...
Source: Mass Device - August 23, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Hospital Care Recalls Sage Products Stryker Source Type: news

Prepping for USMLE Step 2? Here ’s a commonly missed question
The United States Medical Licensing Examination ® (USMLE®) Step 2 is a formidable test, soAMA Wire® is providing frequent expert insights to help you prepare for it. Take a few minutes here to work through another of the most-missed USMLE Step 2 test prep questions and view an expert video explanation of the answer from Kaplan Medical. Once you ’ve got this question under your belt, be sure to test your knowledge with other posts in this series. Ready. Set. Go.This month ’s question that stumped most students: A 27-year-old immigrant from El Salvador has a 14 x 12 x 9-cm mass in her left bre...
Source: AMA Wire - August 20, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Troy Parks Source Type: news

Latin-American, Caribbean health systems need more investment as populations age
Though the health systems in Brazil, Colombia, El Salvador, Jamaica, Mexico and Panama have considerable strengths, citizens still reported gaps in the way primary care is organized, financed and delivered in those countries. Those who had better experiences were less likely to say that their health system needed major reforms, outlines a new report. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - August 9, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Latin American, Caribbean health systems need more investment as populations age
The health systems of six Latin American and Caribbean countries have made substantial progress toward universal coverage — providing free or subsidized healthcare to the majority of their populations — but continue to face challenges managing more complex health needs such as those related to cardiovascular disease, cancer, stroke and depression, a new study from the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health and the Inter-American Development Bank finds. Though the health systems in Brazil, Colombia, El Salvador, Jamaica, Mexico and Panama have considerable strengths, citizens still reported gaps in the way primar...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 8, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Horrific moment doctor pops huge cyst on child's eye
WARNING: GRAPHIC CONTENT. The child was admitted to hospital in Sonsonante, El Salvador, in February with a slow-growing inflammation on his eye duct, known as a chalazion. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Magma build-up may put Salvadoran capital at risk
The build-up of magma six kilometres below El Salvador's Ilopango caldera means the capital city of San Salvador may be at risk from future eruptions, University of Bristol researchers have found. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - July 22, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Research; Faculty of Science, Faculty of Science, School of Earth Sciences; Press Release Source Type: news

El Salvador confirms second case of Zika-linked microcephaly
SAN SALVADOR (Reuters) - El Salvador confirmed on Friday a second case of a baby born with microcephaly linked to the Zika virus, the mosquito borne disease that can cause the serious birth defect and other severe fetal brain defects. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - July 8, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Zika Fears Prompt Searches For Abortion Alternatives, Study Finds
By Julie Steenhuysen CHICAGO, June 22 (Reuters) - Fearing the effects of the Zika virus on their unborn children, pregnant women in Latin America increasingly have sought out abortion pills online from a nonprofit aid agency, a new study has found. The research, published on Wednesday as a letter in the New England Journal of Medicine, is the first to measure the response of pregnant women to Zika warnings in countries where abortion is limited or banned. First detected in Brazil last year, the current Zika outbreak has been linked to more than 1,400 cases of microcephaly, a rare birth defect that can lead to severe develo...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

El Salvador says confirms first case of microcephaly linked to Zika
SAN SALVADOR (Reuters) - El Salvador confirmed on Tuesday its first case of microcephaly in a baby linked to the Zika virus, the health ministry said. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - June 14, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Coastal Flooding Will Hit World's Biggest Polluters Hardest
Three of the world's heaviest polluters will likely face the greatest human and financial costs caused by coastal flooding, one of the effects of climate change. According to a report released Monday by Christian Aid, an anti-poverty organization, people living in the U.S., China and India -- three of the world's very worst offenders in terms of greenhouse gas emission -- face the greatest risks posed by coastal flooding. By 2060, more than a billion people worldwide will likely confront coastal flooding due to sea level rise, storm surges and extreme weather, with the majority of those people living in major cities t...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 16, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Incest, No Sex Education Drive Teen Pregnancies in El SalvadorIncest, No Sex Education Drive Teen Pregnancies in El Salvador
Rape at the hands of relatives and a lack of sex education are driving pregnancies among girls in El Salvador, which is struggling to stem one of the highest rates of teenage pregnancy in Latin America, according to a top health official. Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - May 3, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Ob/Gyn & Women ' s Health News Source Type: news

El Salvador: UN expert calls on Government to protect victims of contemporary slavery
A United Nations human rights expert today called on the Government of El Salvador to develop and implement a wide range of initiatives to protect the victims of contemporary forms of slavery, such as forced labour and domestic servitude. (Source: UN News Centre - Women, Children, Population)
Source: UN News Centre - Women, Children, Population - April 29, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Call the Paramedics -- My Boyfriend Has the Sniffles
This originally appeared on Sum of My Pieces. Last weekend my boyfriend came down with a wicked case of Ebola. Wait, that doesn't seem right -- I feel like I would've heard about a Jersey outbreak or I'd remember being forced into quarantine. But if it wasn't Ebola, then what was it that made him too weak to move as he neared his end and repeatedly reminded me how very gravely ill he was? Oh that's right -- I remember now. A cold. That's what my boyfriend had. Case of the sniffles. And it got me thinking, mainly about how men are usually such wimps when they're sick, while women seem to able to power through. Maybe it's be...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 14, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Rising hunger in Central America and Haiti as El Niño follows prolonged drought – UN agency
The United Nations food relief agency committed today to assisting 1.6 million people hit by droughts exacerbated by El Niño in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Haiti and building resilience against future climatic shocks. (Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security)
Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security - April 7, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Psychometric properties of the Plutchik's Violence Risk Scale on adolescent sample of Spanish-speaking population - Alcázar-Córcoles MÁ, Verdejo-García A, Bouso-Sáiz JC.
The objective of the present study was the validation and scaling of the Plutchik´s Violence Risk Scale (EV) in adolescent Spanish-speaking population. METHODS: For this purpose, a sample of adolescents from El Salvador, Mexi... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 13, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

The CDC Makes One Big Change To Its Zika Virus Travel Warnings
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention made one crucial update Friday to its travel warnings for the 37 countries and territories affected by Zika virus. Instead of issuing a blanket warning against entire countries, the CDC is adjusting their health notices to take into account the area’s elevation. The Aedes aegypti mosquito, the main mode of Zika virus transmission, does not generally live in areas that are 6,500 feet or more above sea level. This means women who are pregnant will likely not encounter a mosquito carrying Zika if they stay in high-elevation areas, although the agency notes that th...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 11, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Weekend Roundup: Why the 'Persian Spring' May Succeed Where the Arab Spring Failed
Could it be that the 'Persian Spring,' manifested by the anti-hard-line vote this week in which over 60 percent of Iran's eligible electorate went to the polls, has a better chance to succeed than the Arab Spring? Unlike the brittle autocracies in most of the Arab world that shattered when challenged, Iran has a robust civil society combined with quasi-democratic institutions put in place after the revolution in 1979 that seemingly enable the country to evolve instead of explode. And Iranians are intent on making their own changes without the outside interventions that have roiled the broader Mideast region in recent year...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 5, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

If You Don't Like The Idea Of Abortion, Don't Get One
The World Health Organization estimates that 211 million pregnancies occur each year. Approximately 87 million of these pregnancies occur unintentionally. Of the total number of pregnancies a year, around 46 million end in abortion. Around 40 percent of these are carried out under unsafe conditions; 47,000 women die as a result of unsafe abortions each year. Surely, this is not what we want for our women. Abortion is not about opinion. Legalizing abortion is not a question of beliefs, taboos or religion-- all that should not even be part of the conversation. Abortion is a question of public health, and it must be dealt wi...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 3, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Central American Universities Implement Standardized HIV Training for Health Workers
More than 20 higher education institutions across Central America have integrated a new HIV curriculum into their nursing, medical, or other health professional training programs thanks to IntraHealth International’s work on the USAID-funded Central America Capacity Project. The training curriculum—which covers a full range of HIV prevention and treatment services, including HIV counseling and testing, reduction of HIV stigma and discrimination, adherence to antiretroviral therapy, biosafety, and post-exposure prophylaxis—is the first of its kind in the region. IntraHealth International helped create this...
Source: IntraHealth International - March 1, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Earth's Rarest Minerals Give Diamonds A Run For Their Money
Marilyn Monroe, who famously said, "Diamonds are a girl's best friend," probably hadn't heard of Sardinian ichnusaite. Ichnusaite, a pearly, colorless and brittle mineral, was discovered on the Italian island of Sardinia in 2013. Mineralogist Robert Hazen says that with only one known specimen, it's a true rarity. "If you wanted to give your fiancé a really rare ring, forget diamond. Give her Sardinian ichnusaite," said Hazen, co-author of a new paper categorizing Earth's rarest minerals. Or maybe go with cobaltomenite, a pink-red mineral found in just four locations -- Utah, ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 17, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Correction: Latin America Zika story
SAN SALVADOR, El Salvador (AP) — Health officials say they're trying to determine if an unusual jump in cases of a rare nerve condition sometimes severe enough to cause paralysis is related to the spread of the mosquito-borne Zika virus in at least two Latin American countries. (Source: U.S. News - Health)
Source: U.S. News - Health - February 16, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Latest On Zika: Experts Are Divided Over Genetically Modified Mosquitos
The Zika virus, which is spread by the Aedes aegypti mosquito, is strongly suspected to be linked to a new wave of microcephaly cases in Brazil. Babies born with the birth defect have smaller heads and sometimes brains that aren't fully developed, which can result in life-long developmental problems.    Zika is currently spreading through Central and South America and the Caribbean, and with the high volume of news about the virus, it's tough to stay up-to-date. Check out our full coverage, or read our daily recaps. Here are four updates, opinions and developments to know about now:   1. ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 16, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Despite Zika Outbreak, Catholic Leaders Say Contraceptives Are ‘Not A Solution’
When Colombia, El Salvador, and Brazil recently warned women not to get pregnant because of the Zika virus, some human rights advocates hoped the outbreak would propel the Latin American nations to reconsider their strict antiabortion laws. But as the virus continues to infect thousands of pregnant women throughout the region, putting them at risk of giving birth to babies born with brain damage, the Roman Catholic Church is doubling down on its conservative stance against both contraceptives and abortion. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 15, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Guillain-Barre on rise in five Latam countries, no proven link to Zika - WHO
GENEVA (Reuters) - A neurological disorder suspected of links to the mosquito-borne Zika virus is on the rise in Brazil, Colombia, El Salvador, Suriname and Venezuela, the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Saturday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - February 13, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Zika Virus Threat Puts Abortion Rights And Disability Rights On Collision Course
As more cases of Zika virus pop up in the U.S., abortion rights advocates are raising concerns about whether harsh abortion restrictions will affect pregnant women’s ability to terminate pregnancies if they’re infected with the virus. Zika has been linked to microcephaly, in which babies are born with underdeveloped brains and abnormally small heads. Some cases seen in Brazil and elsewhere in the Americas have been severe. As The Huffington Post reported last week, people born with microcephaly “may suffer from additional ailments, including convulsions, impaired vision and hearing, deformed limbs an...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 4, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Pregnant women infected with Zika in South America will be sent abortion drugs
International charity Women on Web is offering to send pregnant women the pills for free in countries like El Salvador and Nicaragua, where termination is illegal. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 4, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What Pregnant Women Should Know About Zika Virus
On Monday, the World Health Organization declared a "public health emergency of international concern" due to the cluster of birth defects potentially linked to Zika virus.   No one is probably more concerned about this connection than the world’s pregnant women, especially those who are living in an area where there is ongoing Zika virus transmission. While the virus’ symptoms (fever, headache, joint pain, conjunctivitis) are no cause for alarm and rarely require hospitalization, the disease is suspected of causing severe birth defects like microcephaly, when a baby is born with an abnormally sm...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 2, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news