Covax, the Developing World ’ s Hope against COVID, Has Made It Only Halfway
Delivery of syringes for the vaccination campaign in El Salvador. Latin American countries have made steady progress in immunizing their populations, partly through direct negotiations between their governments and suppliers and partly through international cooperation. CREDIT: PAHO By Humberto MárquezCARACAS, Jan 20 2022 (IPS) The Covax initiative, the hope of the countries of the developing South to immunize their populations against COVID-19, only met half of its goals in 2021. And as 2022 begins, and the omicron variant of the virus is spreading fast, the scheme still depends on the decisions of pharmaceutical compani...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - January 20, 2022 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Humberto Marquez Tags: COVID-19 Development & Aid Editors' Choice Featured Global Global Governance Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies Regional Categories TerraViva United Nations COVAX COVID-19 vaccines Source Type: news

El Salvador explores low-interest loans backed by Bitcoin
Small businesses to get a Bitcoin boost in El Salvador as the government sets its sights on low-interest loans backed by BTC. #bitcoin #bitcoinsmall #elsalvador (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - January 20, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mental Health Services Help Health Workers Improve HIV Services in Central America
By Jenny Alc ázar, Communications SpecialistJanuary 18, 2022" During the pandemic, there have been a lot of stressful moments,” says Juan,* a health worker who helps clients return to treatment after missing their previous appointments. “And those were in addition to continuing to reach the goals of our HIV program.”It’s no secret that COVID-19 affects mental health and well-being for us all—but especially for health workers. Lack of knowledge about the disease, the spread of misinformation, and fear of contracting COVID-19 have taken a toll on our emotional and physical wellbeing.Heal...
Source: IntraHealth International - January 18, 2022 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: kseaton Tags: HIV & AIDS COVID-19 Health Workers Source Type: news

China Opens Embassy in Nicaragua for First Time since 1990 after Taiwan Ties Cut
By Genevieve Donnellon-MayAUSTRALIA, Jan 10 2022 (IPS) For the first time since 1990, China has (re)opened an embassy in Managua, Nicaragua, less than a month after Nicaragua cut ties with Taiwan. The (re)opening of the embassy on January 1, 2022 comes amidst the backdrop of US-China tensions, particularly over trade and Taiwan, as well as worsening Cross-Straits relations. Genevieve Donnellon-MayChina and Nicaragua officially (re)established diplomatic relations last month. On December 10, Asia time, diplomatic relations between China and Nicaragua were officially established. The official “Joint Communiqué on the Res...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - January 10, 2022 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Genevieve Donnellon-May Tags: Asia-Pacific COVID-19 Economy & Trade Headlines TerraViva United Nations Trade & Investment IPS UN Bureau Source Type: news

El Salvador frees 3 women who were sentenced to 30 years under anti-abortion laws
#elsalvador (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - December 26, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

El Salvador Releases 3 Women Serving Long Prison Sentences for Abortions
The three women, who had suffered obstetric emergencies, had been sentenced to 30 years in prison under the nation’s strict anti-abortion laws. #emergencies (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - December 25, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

El Salvador frees three women convicted of abortions
Abortion rights groups say President Nayib Bukele’s government has freed three Salvadoran women who were sentenced to 30 years in prison under the nation’s strict anti-abortion laws after suffering obstetric emergencies (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - December 25, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Washington state Sen. Doug Ericksen dies after COVID battle at age 52
Ericksen's death Friday came weeks after he said he had tested positive for the coronavirus while in El Salvador. #washingtonstate #dougericksen #elsalvador (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - December 20, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Doug Ericksen, state senator who fought vaccine mandates, dies at 52
Washington Republican and Trump supporter who opposed pandemic emergency orders said he tested positive for Covid in El Salvador #elsalvador #dougericksen #supporter (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - December 19, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Washington state Sen. Doug Ericksen dies after COVID battle
Sen. Doug Ericksen’s death came weeks after he said he had tested positive for the coronavirus while in El Salvador, though his cause of death wasn’t immediately released. #washingtonstate #dougericksen #elsalvador (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - December 19, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

State senator dies a month after telling a local radio station he was sick with Covid-19 while in El Salvador
A Washington state senator has died a month after confirming with a local radio station he was in El Salvador and sick with Covid-19. #statesenator #radiostation #elsalvador (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - December 19, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

El Salvador to inaugurate Bitcoin City backed by $1B Bitcoin bonds
Crypto exchange Bitfinex will support El Salvador’s Bitcoin City initiative by launching a securities platform to hold the $1 billion Bitcoin bonds. #elsalvador #bitcoincity #bitfinex (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - November 21, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

For Girls, the Biggest Danger of Sexual Violence Lurks at Home
Girls' sexual and reproductive rights activist Mía Calderón stands on San Martín Avenue in San Juan de Lurigancho, the most populous municipality of Peru's capital. She complained that the pandemic once again highlighted the fact that sexual violence against girls comes mainly from someone close to home and that the girls are often not believed. CREDIT: Mariela Jara/IPSBy Mariela JaraLIMA, Oct 22 2021 (IPS) “During the pandemic, sexual violence against girls has grown because they have been confined with their abusers. If the home is not a safe place for them, what is then, the streets?” Mía Calderón, a yo...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - October 22, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Mariela Jara Tags: Civil Society COVID-19 Development & Aid Editors' Choice Gender Gender Violence Headlines Health Human Rights Latin America & the Caribbean Regional Categories Domestic Abuse Domestic Violence Peru Sexual Abuse Sexual Violenc Source Type: news

Global heating ‘may lead to epidemic of kidney disease’
Deadly side-effect of heat stress is threat to rising numbers of workers in hot climates, doctors warn‘You shouldn’t work if your kidneys are failing – but people can’t afford not to’Read more in theHarmed by heat seriesChronic kidney disease linked to heat stress could become a major health epidemic for millions of workers around the world as global temperatures increase over the coming decades, doctors have warned.More research into the links between heat and CKDu – chronic kidney disease of uncertain cause – is urgently needed to assess the potential scale of the problem, they have said.Continue reading......
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 21, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Natalie Grover Tags: Global health Science Workers' rights Americas Global development Nicaragua El Salvador Agriculture Diabetes Human rights High blood pressure Society World news Cop26 Source Type: news

The World ’s First Malaria Vaccine—and What it Means for the Future of Pandemic Response
On Oct. 6, the World Health Organization recommended use of the first vaccine to fight malaria. The decision is momentous and highly anticipated for many reasons: among them is that this is the first vaccine to help reduce the risk of deadly severe malaria in young children in Sub-Saharan Africa, where the disease remains a leading killer. The vaccine offers hope that there can be a circle of learning from one pandemic to the next. Malaria, our oldest pandemic, may offer insights on how we can survive contemporary scourges like COVID-19. Malaria evolved at least 2.5 million years ago and first infected humans in rural part...
Source: TIME: Science - October 7, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Raj Panjabi Tags: Uncategorized health healthscienceclimate Source Type: news