Health Officials Blast Congress Delay Of Zika Emergency Funds
By Bill Berkrot(Reuters) - Top U.S. health officials said on Monday the long delay in getting Congress to approve funding to fight the Zika virus came at a heavy cost in dealing with what they called a serious public health threat. They said the $1.1 billion in newly approved funding for Zika would be used to expand mosquito control programs, accelerate vaccine development and begin important studies of its effect on babies and children born to mothers infected during pregnancy. President Barack Obama in February requested $1.9 billion in emergency Zika funding. After months of political wrangling, Congress last week final...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - October 3, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Health Officials Blast Congress Delay Of Zika Emergency Funds
By Bill Berkrot(Reuters) - Top U.S. health officials said on Monday the long delay in getting Congress to approve funding to fight the Zika virus came at a heavy cost in dealing with what they called a serious public health threat. They said the $1.1 billion in newly approved funding for Zika would be used to expand mosquito control programs, accelerate vaccine development and begin important studies of its effect on babies and children born to mothers infected during pregnancy. President Barack Obama in February requested $1.9 billion in emergency Zika funding. After months of political wrangling, Congress last week final...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 3, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A top 10 list waiting to save lives!
By Drs. David Niesel and Norbert Herzog Sometimes I have to remind myself we are in the 21st Century when I hear that infectious diseases are a leading cause of death among adults and remain the leading cause of death in children. While most of these deaths occur in the developing world, a significant number occur in middle income countries. Vaccines are the most cost effective medical intervention known to prevent infectious diseases. An effective vaccine can significantly reduce the mortality associated with them. However, while we have come a long way, the reality is that we have relatively few effective vaccines. O...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - September 29, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

What 1989 And The Golden Girls Tell Us About Medicine Today
Today, 1989 may be most associated with Taylor Swift: It is the album that won her a second Grammy for Album of the Year. Not only that, it happens to be the year Swift was born--such a long, long time ago! People under 35 have no personal memory of 1980s pop culture, which is ironic since Swift's album in part pays homage to it. In the real 1989 (no offense to Swift and the 10 co-producers who made the album), all sorts of revolutions took place: Mr. Gorbachev tore down that pesky wall, for example. America's greatest antagonist, the Soviet Union, collapsed in 1989. Brazil conducted its first democrat...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 23, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mark Zuckerberg, Priscilla Chan Pledge Billions To Fight All Disease
Facebook Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg and his wife Priscilla Chan on Wednesday pledged more than $3 billion toward a plan to “cure, prevent or manage all disease within our children’s lifetime.” Speaking through tears at a San Francisco event to announce the initiative, Chan said she hoped to spare parents the pain she had seen while delivering difficult news as a pediatrician. “In those moments and in many others we’re at the limit of what we understand about the human body and disease, the science behind medicine, the limit of our ability to alleviate suffering. We want to push back that...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

United Nations pledges to fight drug-resistant superbugs
(Reuters) – United Nations member countries pledged for the first time on Wednesday to take steps to tackle the threat posed by drug-resistant superbugs in a coordinated effort to curb the spread of infections by pathogens that defy antimicrobial medicines. The pledge during the annual U.N. General Assembly in New York followed years of warnings by global health officials about the rise of drug-resistant infections, which threaten to wipe out all effective antibiotics and antifungal medicines, leaving the world vulnerable to simple infections that once could be easily cured. “Antimicrobial resistance poses a fu...
Source: Mass Device - September 21, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: MassDevice Tags: Hospital Care Sterilization / Calibration United Nations Source Type: news

Is The Shocking News of the Sugar Industry's Influence Over Harvard Researchers Really Shocking?
Hey, Sugar, pay no attention to the man behind the curtain. Today, the Journal of the American Medical Association dropped an alleged bombshell when it disclosed that the sugar industry lobby influenced research on coronary heart disease by effectively bribing Harvard researchers to promote the theory that dietary fat, and not sugar, causes heart disease. The story is trending on Facebook at this very moment, and the JAMA Facebook post states that "Policymaking committees should consider giving less weight to food industry-funded studies, and include mechanistic and animal studies as well as studies appraising the ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 14, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

J & J submits Ebola vaccine regimen to WHO for EUAL
Johnson& Johnson ’s (J&J) Janssen Vaccines& Prevention has submitted its investigational preventive Ebola prime-boost vaccine regimen for review to the World Health Organisation (WHO) for Emergency Use Assessment and Listing (EUAL). (Source: Pharmaceutical Technology)
Source: Pharmaceutical Technology - September 13, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

[Editorial] Ebola and Zika: Cautionary tales
The emergence of Zika in the Americas is a stark reminder of how quickly public health challenges of infectious diseases can change. The need for a safe and effective vaccine is immediate. Yet, like the Ebola epidemic 2 years ago, we find ourselves without a vaccine to combat this latest threat. When surveillance points to a possible emergence of a new infectious disease of potential public health importance, we need procedural and funding mechanisms that can quickly identify candidate vaccines and drive research and development toward licensure and production. Even if such a vaccine is not yet licensed, having it ready fo...
Source: ScienceNOW - September 9, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Michael T. Osterholm Source Type: news

[Perspective] Zika vaccine trials
Promising data for candidate vaccines against Zika virus infection reported by Abbink et al. (1) on page 1129 of this issue raise hopes that one or more Zika virus vaccines may soon be ready for efficacy trials. Recent years have seen a barrage of emerging infectious diseases, including those caused by new pathogens such as Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronavirus, and those that are newly salient because of increased geographic spread, higher incidence, or genetic change, such as influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, Ebola virus, and Zika virus. Developing effective vaccines is a central goal for such pathogens. Authors: Mar...
Source: ScienceNOW - September 9, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Marc Lipsitch Tags: Infectious Disease Source Type: news

BioCryst shares tick up on positive results for Ebola-targeted compound
Shares of Research Triangle Park-based drug developer BioCryst Pharmaceuticals shot up more than 10 percent midday Wednesday after the pharma disclosed good news on an antiviral the feds hope could someday offset an Ebola outbreak. Ebola, which made major headlines two years ago when a massive outbreak in West Africa was blamed for thousands of deaths, is a hemorrhagic fever that currently has no FDA-approved vaccine or treatment. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, IV fluids… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - September 7, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Lauren K. Ohnesorge Source Type: news

BioCryst shares tick up on positive results for Ebola-targeted compound
Shares of Research Triangle Park-based drug developer BioCryst Pharmaceuticals shot up more than 10 percent midday Wednesday after the pharma disclosed good news on an antiviral the feds hope could someday offset an Ebola outbreak. Ebola, which made major headlines two years ago when a massive outbreak in West Africa was blamed for thousands of deaths, is a hemorrhagic fever that currently has no FDA-approved vaccine or treatment. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, IV fluids… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - September 7, 2016 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Lauren K. Ohnesorge Source Type: news

Human Vs. Pathogen: The Art Of Battling Infectious Disease
Mankind vs. Pathogen. This idea--the ages-old, microscopic battle between parasites, bacteria, viruses and human immune systems--is the essence of the science performed by myself and so many other infectious disease researchers. Winning this battle, advancing the knowledge and cures necessary to ultimately defeat global diseases, is precisely where our work is focused. Inspired by the battle our scientists wage against deadly disease-causing pathogens, we have developed a series of posters to capture the spirit of this battle of "Human vs. Pathogen". Our aim is to highlight the creativity, imagination, and pa...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - September 6, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Ebola stayed in the semen of one man for 565 days, raising new public health concerns
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warned late Tuesday that Ebola lingers in semen much longer than previously believed, underscoring how much we still don’t understand about the virus. Researchers initially thought that once people survived Ebola, they were immune and could no longer get sick and transmit the virus to others, as is the case with many other infectious diseases we’re […]Related:Centers for Disease Control will run out of money to fight Zika in U.S. next monthThese futuristic contact lenses dispense drugs while you wear themMore parents b...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - August 31, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Ebola stayed in the semen of one man for 565 days
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warned late Tuesday that Ebola lingers in semen much longer than previously believed, underscoring how much we still don't understand about the virus. Researchers initially thought that once people survived Ebola they were immune and could no longer get sick and transmit the virus to others, as is the case with many other infectious diseases we're […]Related:These futuristic contact lenses dispense drugs while you wear themMore parents believe vaccines are ‘unnecessary,’ while a mumps outbreak growsSingapore Zika cases...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - August 31, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Lessons from Ebola and Zika: How to Prevent the Next Pandemic
Harvard University, Harvard Global Health Institute. 08/22/2016 This 58-minute presentation features a panel discussion about previous responses to infectious disease outbreaks, such as Ebola and Middle East respiratory syndrome-corona virus (MERS-CoV), and how to learn from any missteps in previous responses to prevent the next pandemic. Speakers discuss the inability to develop vaccines quickly, and the current response to the Zika outbreak. One speaker also discusses his work during the 2014-2015 Ebola outbreak and the lessons that must be learned to prepare for the next pandemic. (Video or Multimedia) (Source: Disaster...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - August 26, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

UCLA faculty voice: What the UN must do to wipe out cholera in Haiti
UCLA Ralph Frerichs Ralph Frerichs is professor emeritus of epidemiology in the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health. He recently authored, in collaboration with Renaud Piarroux, “Deadly River: Cholera and Cover-up in Post-earthquake Haiti.” This op-ed appeared in the Boston Globe. It is not enough that the United Nations is finally beginning to acknowledge its involvement in the lethal cholera epidemic in Haiti. Now it must urgently do everything in its power to eliminate cholera in Haiti before thousands more die. Cholera was brought to Haiti in October 2010 by UN peacekeepers from Nepal. Some of the Nepale...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 24, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Liberia: Liberia, Guinea, S/Leone, Partners Review Ebola Clinical Trials
[Observer] Medical personnel from Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone with their international partners have begun sharing views on clinical trials of vaccines that began about a year ago for the deadly Ebola disease. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - August 18, 2016 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Liberia: Dr. Golakai Decries Discrepancies in Ebola Research
[Observer] Dr. Vuyu Kanda Golakai, Dean of the A.M. Dogliotti College of Medicine, Liberia's medical school, stunned a gathering of medical professionals in Monrovia on Tuesday when he confronted the gathering with what he described as gaps in the conduct of Ebola vaccine research in Liberia. These gaps, according to him, are a result of deviations from standard scientific research norms and suggest a one-sided agenda on the part of international partners. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - August 18, 2016 Category: African Health Source Type: news

How antiviral antibodies become part of immune memory
(Emory Health Sciences) Emory scientists probe activated B cells, important for forming immune memory, during flu vaccination and infection and Ebola infection in humans. Understanding how to elicit these cells is critical for designing effective vaccines. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 15, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Obama Shifts Cash To Fight Zika; Vacationing Republicans Take Credit
WASHINGTON ― President Barack Obama’s administration announced Thursday the transfer of some $80 million in additional funds to combat the growing Zika threat after Congress refused to pass a $1.9 billion package before going on a seven-week break. Nevertheless, congressional Republicans took credit for convincing the White House to act when Congress would not. “For over six months we have been calling on the administration to use every existing resource at their disposal to address this crisis,” Rep. Hal Rogers (R-Ky.), chairman of the House Appropriations Committee, said in a statement. “Our cal...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 12, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New compound offers hope for millions
A single class of drugs could treat chagas disease, leishmaniasis and sleeping sickness Related items fromOnMedica Parasitic worm increases women's fertility Weight loss linked to intestinal worms helps fight the parasite World ‘not prepared’ for Zika and Ebola Better use of vaccines could help tackle antimicrobial resistance Drugs firm waives drug patents in poor countries (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - August 9, 2016 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Obama Tells Congress To 'Do Its Job' On Zika
WASHINGTON ― Saying the Zika threat is “getting critical,” President Barack Obama called on Congress Thursday to go back to work and pass the funding he has sought since February to combat the disease now spreading in Florida. Lawmakers failed to pass any funding to deal with the mosquito-borne disease before they went on their seven-week break last month. Since then, at least 15 Americans have gotten infected in the Miami area. “Congress needs to do its job,” Obama said in a news conference at the Pentagon. “Fighting Zika costs money.” Obama originally asked for $1.9 billion to beef u...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 5, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Pregnant women to serve as human guinea pigs for experimental Zika vaccine
(NaturalNews) Researchers from MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) have developed a brand new vaccine – in just seven days, believe it or not – that they claim is capable of treating everything from Ebola and H1N1 influenza, to the newest villain on the block:... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 4, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Health Secretary Details How Congress Is Screwing Over Americans Who Get Zika
WASHINGTON ― Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Burwell delivered a letter to key lawmakers on Wednesday that explained exactly how their underfunded response to the Zika virus is screwing Americans over. President Barack Obama asked Congress for $1.9 billion in February to deal with the impending outbreak of Zika in the United States. Congress finally began working on the request in May, with the Senate passing a bipartisan compromise that was about $800 million short. The bill got tanked in a partisan squabble last month after Republicans decided to add in contraception restrictions, a pro-Confederate flag prov...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 4, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

With Congress On Break, Zika Funding Runs Out This Month
WASHINGTON ― Key federal programs to create a vaccine against the Zika virus will run out of money this month if Congress doesn’t authorize new spending, the Obama administration said Monday. Congress is on vacation until after Labor Day, and leaders of the House and Senate both said Friday that there was no reason for Congress to rush back, citing reports that $384 million remains available to fight the mosquito-borne virus. The offices of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) and House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) both pointed to those reports after news that four people had contracted Zika from mosquitoes...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 2, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Experimental vaccine could provide rapid response to diseases
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (Reuters) - A type of experimental vaccine that can be made in just a week and has protected mice against influenza, Ebola and Zika viruses may offer promise for quick responses to disease outbreaks in people, according to Massachusetts Institute of Technology researchers. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - August 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Africa: Ebola Response Crippled By Low Stocks of Vital Items
[SciDev.Net] Manchester -Glass vials, coolers and chicken eggs needed for vaccine manufacture are the first things lacking when a global pandemic breaks, so governments should stockpile them or be ready to rapidly increase their supply, a UK conference has heard. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - July 27, 2016 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Merck receives Breakthrough Therapy Designation from FDA and PRIME status from EMA for investigational Ebola Zaire vaccine (V920)
Merck (NYSE:MRK), known as MSD outside the United States and Canada, has announced two regulatory milestones for the company's investigational vaccine for Ebola Zaire, V920 (rVSV∆G-ZEBOV-GP, live attenuated): the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted the vaccine candidate Breakthrough Therapy Designation, and the European Medicines Agency (EMA) has granted PRIME (PRIority MEdicines) status. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - July 26, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Merck Business and Industry Source Type: news

Summer Arrives with No Funding to Fight Zika
Congress has recessed for the summer without reaching a compromise on how to fight Zika virus. In the days leading up to the break, the Senate again took up the issue as part of defense funding legislation. Senate Democrats agreed to start conference negotiations with the House, however, a procedural vote failed to get the required 60 votes. The Senate previously approved $1.1 billion in emergency funding, with no requirement to offset the spending from other programs. If enacted, the funds could be used for vaccine development and for mosquito control. Democrats have objected to a provision that would temporarily halt ce...
Source: Public Policy Reports - July 25, 2016 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Merck Receives Breakthrough Therapy Designation from FDA and PRIME Status from EMA for Investigational Ebola Zaire Vaccine (V920)
Dateline City: KENILWORTH, N.J. KENILWORTH, N.J.--( BUSINESS WIRE )--Merck (NYSE:MRK), known as MSD outside the United States and Canada, today announced two regulatory milestones for the company ’s investigational vaccine for Ebola Zaire, V920 (rVSV∆G-ZEBOV-GP, live attenuated): the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted the vaccine candidate Breakthrough Therapy Designation, and the European Medicines Agency (EMA) has granted PRIME ( PRI ority ME dicines) status. Language: English Contact: Merck Media: Pamela Eisele, 267-305-3558 Skip Irvine, ...
Source: Merck.com - Corporate News - July 25, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Ebola Newsroom Corporate News Latest News #Merck #MRK $MRK MSD Source Type: news

New in the Hastings Center Report: Research on nonhuman primates
(The Hastings Center) During the recent Ebola outbreak, scientific developments involving infection challenge experiments on nonhuman primates (NHPs) sparked hope that successful treatments and vaccines may soon become available. Yet these studies intentionally expose sophisticated animals to severe suffering and a high risk of death. Should research on NHPs other than great apes be subject to tighter restrictions than it currently is? (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 18, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Positive preliminary results of a heat stable Ebola vaccine formulation
(University of Hawaii Cancer Center) A biopharmaceutical company collaborating with Hawai'i scientists on an Ebola vaccine announced encouraging news about its vaccine today.Tests on the vaccine, still in development, have shown it is able to retain its effectiveness without refrigeration. That is a real plus when you are talking about many rural areas in Africa that are most at-risk for another Ebola outbreak. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 18, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Zika virus epidemic to last 'another three years'
Conclusion This modelling study aimed to explore the trends of the current Zika epidemic and use this data to predict the future spread of the virus. From the analysis, the main predictions were that the current epidemic will largely be over in three years, with seasonal variation based on mosquito populations. Additionally, once the current epidemic is over, there will be a delay of at least a decade before another large Zika virus epidemic. However, as the researchers acknowledge, with any modelling study the results are based on data available and some assumptions. There is a great deal of uncertainty that comes with ...
Source: NHS News Feed - July 15, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pregnancy/child Source Type: news

What The Fading Ebola Epidemic Can Teach Us About The Looming Zika Crisis
By Thomas Frieden As the world's worst Ebola epidemic fades in the rearview mirror of history, it's worth remembering what happened and the key lessons learned. Beginning in March 2014, Ebola began spreading rapidly in Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Guinea. Nearly 30,000 people were eventually afflicted with the disease, and more than 11,000 died. Ebola spread to Nigeria, Mali, the United States, and other countries. In response to the emerging epidemic, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention activated its Emergency Operations Center to fight Ebola. This would become the CDC's largest and most intense outbreak resp...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 13, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Progress towards protection from highly lethal Ebola, Marburg viruses
Ebola and Marburg filovirus disease outbreaks have typically occurred as isolated events, confined to central Africa. However, the recent Ebola epidemic spread to several African countries, and caused 11,000 deaths. That epidemic underscored the need to develop vaccines and therapeutics that could be used to fight future disease outbreaks. Now new research suggests that antibodies to filoviruses from individuals who have survived these diseases may offer protection -- not only against the particular filovirus that infected an individual, but against other filoviruses, as well. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - July 12, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Progress towards protection from highly lethal Ebola, Marburg viruses
(American Society for Microbiology) Ebola and Marburg filovirus disease outbreaks have typically occurred as isolated events, confined to central Africa. However, the recent Ebola epidemic spread to several African countries, and caused 11,000 deaths. That epidemic underscored the need to develop vaccines and therapeutics that could be used to fight future disease outbreaks. Now new research suggests that antibodies to filoviruses from individuals who have survived these diseases may offer protection -- not only against the particular filovirus that infected an individual, but against other filoviruses, as well. (Source: E...
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 12, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

SUPPLEMENTS: Implementing an Ebola Vaccine Study — Sierra Leone
(Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - July 7, 2016 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Engineers design programmable RNA vaccines
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) MIT engineers have designed programmable RNA vaccines that could be rapidly manufactured and deployed. The vaccines have been shown effective against Ebola, H1N1 influenza, and Toxoplasma gondii, in tests in mice. They could also be useful against other infectious diseases and cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 4, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Report of the Independent Panel on the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Ebola Response
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response. 06/30/2016This 57-page report summarizes a request to capture critical lessons from the Ebola epidemic of 2014-2016 and review the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)'s international and domestic responses. It summarizes an Independent Panel's assessment of HHS's challenges, and, where appropriate, challenges facing the broader U.S. government. It describes notable opportunities for improvement in leadership and organization, communication, management, and logistics, as well as in development and use of ...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - July 3, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Ebola survivor thanks Winnipeg researchers who developed the vaccine that saved her
A woman from Sierra Leon West Africa who survived the Ebola virus got a chance to meet the Winnipeg researchers who developed the drug that saved her life. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - June 10, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Canada/Manitoba Source Type: news

Zika Funding Advances in Congress
Both chambers of Congress have approved legislation to address the Zika pandemic. Major differences exist, however, between the House and Senate versions of this legislation. The Senate approved $1.1 billion in emergency funding, with no requirement to offset the spending from other programs. If enacted, the funds could be used for vaccine development and for mosquito control. The upper chamber also considered—and rejected—an amendment that would have provided more funding, as well as an amendment that would have offset the cost of combating Zika. Meanwhile, the House of Representatives has voted to appropri...
Source: Public Policy Reports - May 31, 2016 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Are We Prepared for Emerging Infectious Diseases?
By Drs. David Niesel and Norbert Herzog, Medical Discovery News In the past several years, we have heard a lot about infectious microbes threatening the public health of all Americans. Some of the names of these agents seemed foreign at first but are familiar now - Ebola, MERS and Zika. But are these really new viruses causing disease? No, we have known about these microbes as disease threats in Africa, the Middle East and Central and South America for some time; we have known about Zika since the 1940s. A better way to describe these viruses is as emerging infectious diseases, viruses that used to be limited to small ge...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 24, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Economic Interests Harming Global Health: WHO Chief
Margaret Chan, Director-General of the World Health Organization (WHO), during the WHO Executive Board's special session on the Ebola emergency. Credit: UN Photo/Violaine Martin.By Lyndal RowlandsUNITED NATIONS, May 24 2016 (IPS)Putting economic interests over public health is leading the world towards three slow-motion health disasters, Margaret Chan, Director-General of the World Health Organization’s warned the world’s health ministers on Monday.Changes in the world’s climate, the failure of more and more antibiotic drugs and the increase in so-called lifestyle diseases caused by poor diet and exercise...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - May 24, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Lyndal Rowlands Tags: Aid Climate Change Development & Aid Energy Environment Featured Food & Agriculture Global Governance Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies Inequity IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Population Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Source Type: news

EU rapid reaction medical force targets yellow fever in Angola
The European Medical Corps set up after the Ebola crisis is being sent to tackle the yellow fever outbreak that has claimed nearly 300 lives in AngolaThe European Medical Corps (EMC) recently set up by the EU is being sent on its first mission – to help tackle the outbreak of yellow fever in Angola.Since the first case of the mosquito-transmitted disease was reported in the capital, Luanda, in December 2015, 293 people have died, amid some 2,267 reported cases. Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 13, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Matthew Tempest for EurActiv, part of the Guardian development network Tags: Humanitarian response Global development Health European Union Angola Africa World news Infectious diseases Vaccines and immunisation Science Source Type: news

Reluctant Republicans Edge Closer To Taking Zika Action. Sort Of.
International Center for Journalists fellow Paula Minozzo contributed reporting. WASHINGTON -- The threat posed by the spreading Zika virus has been alarming health officials across the Americas since last year. Republicans in Congress on Wednesday finally started show signs they were getting concerned. At least, some of them. Emerging from a weekly meeting with fellow Republicans in the House of Representatives, several members said House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) mentioned that a top priority was dealing with the virus that causes birth defects and other ailments. Still, none of them were willing to embrace the emergenc...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 12, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

House Republicans Are Happy To Dither As Zika Threat Looms
Public health officials are growing more and more concerned about the Zika virus as its true impact in South and Central America becomes clear. In January, the World Health Organization said Zika could be on the verge of spreading throughout the Americas. Health organizations in the U.S. are upping their efforts to develop a vaccine and eradicate the virus, and the White House has asked that money be appropriated to help make this happen. But as certain as death and taxes, Republicans in the House of Representatives have emerged to slow this process to a crawl. GOP lawmakers have met these calls to action with indifference...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 5, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Contributions of Islamic Theology to Modern Day Public Health
Exploring Islam's contribution to public health has been an astounding journey for me. Working across the Middle East, Africa, and South Asia in Muslim majority countries, I'm amazed at not only the history of Islamic theology in contributing to our modern day understanding of public health, but also its potential to improve its practice. Yet, what is puzzling is that very little attention is given to the relationship between Islam and public health, especially in academia. Practices of good hygiene and nutrition, disease prevention, and infectious disease control-- recognized as hallmarks of public health today, were supp...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 4, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Filovirus Medical Countermeasures (MCM) Workshop
U.S. Department of Defense, Joint Program Executive Office for Chemical and Biological Defense. 10/23/2015This resource provides information, presentation slides, and transcripts from a workshop on filovirus medical countermeasures held on October 20-23, 2015. It featured a discussion about how to bridge nonclinical data to the human data, analysis of vaccine endpoints to support establishing a correlate of protection, and information about gaining a better understanding of the difference between the in vitro and in vivo models to test therapeutics. Other topics included vaccines, the Ebola outbreak, and FANG (Filovirus An...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - May 3, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news