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Millions may face protein deficiency as a result of human-caused carbon dioxide emissions
(Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health) If CO2 levels keep rising as projected, the populations of 47 countries may lose more than 5 percent of their dietary protein by 2050 due to a decline in the nutritional value of rice, wheat, and other staple crops, according to Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health researchers. They estimate an additional 250 million people may be at risk of protein deficiency because of elevated CO2 levels. This is the first study to quantify this risk. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 2, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Here's Why a Soda with That Burger Is Especially Fattening
High-sugar drinks combined with protein triggers extra fat storage by body, study finds Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Carbohydrates, Dietary Proteins, Weight Control (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - July 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Dietary Protein Intake and Stroke Risk in Japan Dietary Protein Intake and Stroke Risk in Japan
This study examined the influence of both vegetable and animal protein sources.Stroke (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - June 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery Journal Article Source Type: news

Toddlers Who Drink Cow's Milk Alternatives May Be Shorter
Difference is small, about a half inch at age 3, study findsSource: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Dietary Proteins, Toddler Development, Toddler Nutrition (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - June 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Lentils: the Forgotten Legumes
Beans' little cousins pack in flavor and nutrientsSource: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Dietary Fiber, Dietary Proteins, Nutrition (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - June 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Plant protein may protect against type 2 diabetes, meat eaters at greater risk
A new study adds to the growing body of evidence indicating that the source of dietary protein may play a role in the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The researchers found that plant protein was associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes, while persons with a diet rich in meat had a higher risk. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Virus linked to food sensitivity
Research in mice showed that a seemingly innocuous virus can provoke immune responses to a dietary protein. The findings suggest how patients with Celiac disease may develop a response to gluten. (Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH))
Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) - April 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

[Perspective] How infection can incite sensitivity to food
Immune tolerance to dietary antigens is key to preventing undesirable responses to innocuous antigens ingested with food. On page 44 of this issue, Bouziat et al. (1) report how viral infection may break oral tolerance to dietary proteins. The findings provide an explanation for the known epidemiological association between viral infections and the onset of food sensitivities, such as celiac disease. The results are of great interest considering the recent increase in prevalence of food allergies and autoimmune disorders, which suggests an unknown environmental risk modifier. Authors: Elena F. Verdu, Alberto Caminero (Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - April 7, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Elena F. Verdu Tags: Immunology Source Type: news

Dietary protein - from any source - may help muscle health
(Reuters Health) - Diets high in protein from any source - animals or plants - may help keep muscles big and strong as people age, according to a new study. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - February 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

CU Anschutz research investigates role of protein in obesity among Latin American women
(University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus) Obesity in Latin America is increasingly concentrated among women of low socioeconomic status, but surprisingly little is known about what such women eat or how their diets compare to others. In a study published recently in the American Journal of Human Biology, researchers tested an explanation for greater obesity among these women: limited access to dietary protein leads them to consume a lower proportion of protein in the diet, driving higher calorie intake and obesity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 8, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Blood Levels of Meat-Linked Chemical Tied to Odds of Heart Trouble
Produced when meat, eggs and dairy are digested, TMAO may trigger plaque buildup in vessels, researchers explain Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Dietary Proteins, Heart Attack, Stroke (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - January 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Want to Leave Dinner Feeling Full? Bring on The Beans
Vegetable patties make diners feel fuller than meat so they eat less, Danish study finds Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Dietary Proteins, Nutrition (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - January 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Lots of Red Meat May Be Tied to Gut Disorder in Men
Diverticulitis involves tears or blockages in colon and can be very painful Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Dietary Proteins, Diverticulosis and Diverticulitis, Men's Health (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - January 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Can Protein, Probiotics Help with Blood Sugar Control?
Simple dietary changes seem to reap important benefits, researchers say Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Blood Sugar, Dietary Proteins, Dietary Supplements (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - November 18, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Digestive Byproduct Tied to Meat Raises Risks for Some Heart Patients
Those with narrowed leg arteries and high levels of the byproduct had higher odds of dying early, study suggests Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Dietary Proteins, Peripheral Arterial Disease (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - October 19, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What's The Best Type Of Protein Powder?
This article originally appeared on www.ProShapeFitness.com References: 1. Phillips, SM, and LJ Van Loon. "Dietary Protein for Athletes: From Requirements to Optimum Adaptation." National Center for Biotechnology Information. U.S. National Library of Medicine, n.d. Web. 23 Sept. 2016. 2. Hoffman, Jay R., Nicholas Ratamess A., Jie Kang, Michael Falvo J., and Avery Faigenbaum D. "Effect of Protein Intake on Strength, Body Composition and Endocrine Changes in Strength/Power Athletes." Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition. BioMed Central, 13 Dec. 2006. Web. 23 Sept. 2016. 3. Aragon,...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 30, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How Fast Is Your Dog Aging?
All of us who love dogs are acutely aware that the lifespans of our canine companions are short - much too short. And while the years we spend with a beloved pet seem to fly by, dogs don't just suddenly die when they reach a certain age. They grow older in stages just as we do, but at a tremendously accelerated rate compared to humans. Your four-legged friend may still look and act like a puppy much of the time, but there are age related changes taking place inside him despite his youthful good looks and high energy level. The lifespan of a dog depends primarily on his size, breed (or breed mix), and health status. As a g...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 26, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Dietary supplements and athletes: 5 things to know now
At the 2014 Sochi Olympics, a German biathlete and an Italian bobsledder tested positive for substances banned by the World-Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) — methylhexanamine and dimethhylamphetamine. Both athletes had ingested these substances as part of a dietary supplement they had been led to believe was free of contaminants. However, some banned substances are susceptible to inadvertent use because the manufacturers list them under less recognizable names on the product label. Both athletes were stripped of their medals. In other cases, athletes’ use of banned substances is more intentional. Scores of Russian at...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - August 11, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Laura Moretti Tags: Health & Wellness Teen Health dietary supplements performance-enhancing drugs Source Type: news

Lots of Red Meat, an Earlier Grave?
People who eat more plant-based proteins lower risk of dying younger, study suggests Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Dietary Proteins, Diets (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - August 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

High animal protein intake associated with higher, plant protein with lower mortality rate
The largest study to examine the effects of different sources of dietary protein found that a high intake of proteins from animal sources -- particularly processed and unprocessed red meats -- was associated with a higher mortality rate, while a high intake of protein from plant sources was associated with a lower risk of death. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - August 1, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

11 Science-Backed Ways To Boost Metabolism
Every time we eat or drink, we can thank our metabolism for converting all those calories into energy. Our size, gender, and age all factor into our metabolic rate, but there are also ways to independently control its speed. And the faster our metabolism, the more calories we burn off, making that Krispy Kreme breakfast no longer such a big deal. (OK, the donut probably still isn't the best idea.) Here are 11 proven ways to keep that body burning strong. 1. Sleep! Almost nodding off in line at Starbucks isn't the only downside of not catching enough zzz's. Researchers have found a link between metabolism and sleep, and n...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 15, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Too Much Red Meat Might Harm Kidneys, Study Suggests
Substituting poultry for pork in Chinese diet seemed to reduce risk Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Chronic Kidney Disease, Dietary Proteins, Kidney Failure (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - July 15, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Association of protein intake with the change of lean mass among elderly women
In conclusion, our findings support the current evidence that higher total, and in particular animal protein intakes are beneficial in preserving lean mass. A remarkable finding of this study was that the associations of total and animal protein intake with increased lean mass were more apparent among elderly women who maintained their weight and received vitamin D and calcium supplementation. Since dietary protein intake, vitamin D and weight change are important health concerns of ageing, our results might underscore an important message for public health. Implications of these findingsGreater lean mass area is associate...
Source: The Nutrition Society - April 26, 2016 Category: Nutrition Authors: Cassandra Ellis Source Type: news

Association of protein intake with the change of lean mass among elderly women
In conclusion, our findings support the current evidence that higher total, and in particular animal protein intakes are beneficial in preserving lean mass. A remarkable finding of this study was that the associations of total and animal protein intake with increased lean mass were more apparent among elderly women who maintained their weight and received vitamin D and calcium supplementation. Since dietary protein intake, vitamin D and weight change are important health concerns of ageing, our results might underscore an important message for public health. Implications of these findingsGreater lean mass area is associate...
Source: The Nutrition Society - April 14, 2016 Category: Nutrition Authors: Cassandra Ellis Source Type: news

Losing weight with a high-protein diet can help adults sleep better
Overweight and obese adults who are losing weight with a high-protein diet are more likely to sleep better, according to new research. The study also has studied how dietary protein quantity, sources and patterns affect appetite, body weight and body composition. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 24, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Biodiesel from sugarcane more economical than soybean
(University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences) America's oil consumption far exceeds that of every other country in the world. What's more, it's unsustainable. Soybeans, an important dietary protein and the current primary source of plant-based oils used for biodiesel production, only yield about one barrel per acre. New research shows that engineered sugarcane can produce up to 17 barrels of oil per acre. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 17, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Protein-Heavy Meals Make You Feel Fuller, Sooner
Whether that will lead to weight loss over time is still unclear, however Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Dietary Proteins, Diets (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - March 3, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Kidney-Disease Patients With Dietary Protein From PlantsKidney-Disease Patients With Dietary Protein From Plants
Eating a higher proportion of protein from plant sources like soy, nuts and legumes, rather than animal sources, is tied to reduced mortality risk in people with chronic kidney disease (CKD), according to new research. Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - December 21, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nephrology News Source Type: news

Are protein bars really just candy bars in disguise?
I was traveling by air recently and eating my usual “lunch on the go”—a protein bar and an apple. Across the aisle, I noticed another passenger eating a candy bar. It made me think about recent studies documenting the deplorable state of the average American diet, and the rising rates of obesity. Yet, at first glance, the snack he was enjoying and my quick lunch seemed similar. We were both eating a rectangular bar coated with chocolate icing. I wondered: is my protein bar really a healthier option or is it a lot more like a candy bar than I’d care to admit? So, I carefully compared the nutritional ...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - December 15, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert Shmerling, M.D. Tags: Diet and Weight Loss Healthy Eating candy bars protein bars Source Type: news

Europe Clears Ravicti for Urea Cycle DisordersEurope Clears Ravicti for Urea Cycle Disorders
Glycerol phenylbutyrate (Ravicti) is for patients with urea cycle disorder who cannot be managed by dietary protein restriction and/or amino acid supplementation alone. International Approvals (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - December 1, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Urology News Alert Source Type: news

Emerging Crisis for Seniors: It's Probably Not What You Think
As November is National Caregiver Month, I wanted to shine a light on a topic that caregivers and their loved ones are facing at increasing rates, but that very few people are talking about in public - senior malnutrition.The sheer number of malnourished elderly adults is truly staggering. One in three patients who are admitted to the hospital are affected by this condition. Patients diagnosed with malnutrition have a length of stay three times longer than those who do not arrive in a state of malnutrition. Patients who are malnourished prior to undergoing surgery have a 4 times higher risk of developing a pressure ulcer d...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 20, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Barbecued, Pan-Fried Meat May Boost Kidney Cancer Risk
High-heat cooking methods implicated in new study Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Dietary Proteins, Kidney Cancer (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - November 9, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Dietary protein and vitamin D intake and risk of falls: a secondary analysis of postmenopausal women from the Study of Osteoporotic Fractures - Larocque SC, Kerstetter JE, Cauley JA, Insogna KL, Ensrud K, Lui LY, Allore HG.
More than 90% of hip fractures in older Americans result from a fall. Inadequate intake of dietary protein and vitamin D are common in older adults, and diets in low these could contribute to loss of muscle mass and strength or coordination, in turn increa... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - August 15, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

Preserving Muscle Mass as You Age
Source: HealthDay - Related MedlinePlus Pages: Dietary Proteins, Healthy Aging, Nutrition (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - June 10, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Older Americans Need Protein to Keep Muscles Strong, Study Says
Both animal and plant sources are important Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Dietary Proteins, Seniors' Health (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - June 10, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Media reckons science now proves 'carbs' are fine again
Conclusion This study has found that over a short time period, mice fed a diet that’s low in protein and high in carbohydrates gained less weight than those fed diets with higher levels of protein. It also found that mice lost weight regardless of the amount of protein and carbohydrate if the number of calories was restricted. The researchers say that the mice fed unlimited low protein, high carbohydrate diets did not gain as much weight because they burned off more calories. In this study, their "metabolic status" improved compared to mice with unlimited higher protein diets. However, previous research has...
Source: NHS News Feed - May 29, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food/diet Source Type: news

Switching Carbohydrate to Protein: Weight & Mortality in T2DSwitching Carbohydrate to Protein: Weight & Mortality in T2D
Which dietary protein is better in type 2 diabetes: animal or plant? Cardiovascular Diabetology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - May 25, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology Journal Article Source Type: news

High-Protein Diet May Be Dangerous for Those at Risk of Heart Disease
Weight gain, early death noted in study of older adults Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Dietary Proteins, Diets, Heart Diseases--Prevention (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - May 8, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Meat-Heavy, High-Acid Diet Poses Risk for Those with Kidney Disease
Switching to regimen higher in fruits, veggies might help stave off organ failure, experts say Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Chronic Kidney Disease, Dietary Proteins, Diets (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - February 13, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Feed Your Inner Caveman
As an anti-aging specialist, I’ve spent a lot of time studying and treating osteoporosis among the many “older” patients who come to my wellness clinic. Many of them believe they must accept this painful and dangerous condition as an unavoidable part of aging. This means I also spent a lot of time debunking the osteoporosis propaganda put out by the medical establishment. I want them to learn about the natural ways they can keep their skeletons strong – at any age! Osteoporosis is a “silent” disease, because it gives no clue that you might have it until a slight bump or fall produces a n...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - February 11, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Dr. Al Sears Tags: Anti-Aging energy exercise protein Source Type: news

Older adults: Double your protein to build more muscle
Older adults may need to double up on the recommended daily allowance of protein to efficiently maintain and build muscle. Current US recommendations for daily dietary protein intake are 0.8 grams/kilogram of body weight (roughly 62 g of protein per day for a 170-pound person). (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - January 30, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Fighting malnutrition with 'stronger' chickpea
Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) is considered an excellent whole food as source of dietary proteins, carbohydrates, micronutrients and vitamins. It is the world's second most important pulse crop after common bean, and historically is an important daily staple in the diet of millions of people, especially in developing countries. Chickpea is the subject of a new study. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - December 1, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Fighting malnutrition with a 'stronger' chickpea
(Canadian Science Publishing (NRC Research Press)) Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) is considered an excellent whole food as source of dietary proteins, carbohydrates, micronutrients and vitamins. It is the world's second most important pulse crop after common bean, and historically is an important daily staple in the diet of millions of people, especially in developing countries. Chickpea is the subject of a new study published today in the journal Genome. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 1, 2014 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Low-Carb Dieting: Information, Results and Risks
A diet low in carbohydrates or, "low-carb diet," limits items such as starchy vegetables, fruit and grains while emphasizing dietary protein and fat. (Source: Disabled World)
Source: Disabled World - September 9, 2014 Category: Disability Tags: Diets and Dieting Source Type: news

Is Soy a Foe to Women with Breast Cancer?
Study raises questions about the effect of its estrogen-like properties Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Breast Cancer, Dietary Proteins (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - September 4, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Soy Foods Don't Seem to Protect Against Uterine Cancer
Japanese scientists find no association in large, five-year study Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Dietary Proteins, Uterine Cancer (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - June 18, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Hot Dogs, Salami May Raise Men's Heart Failure Risk, Study Suggests
But unprocessed red meat was not implicated in this research Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Dietary Proteins, Heart Failure, Men's Health (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - June 12, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Diet and Stroke Risk
Source: HealthDay - Related MedlinePlus Pages: Dietary Proteins, Stroke (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - June 12, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Diets Rich in Protein May Help Protect Against Stroke
Study found lean animal proteins like fish showed most benefit Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Dietary Proteins, Stroke (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - June 11, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Red meat consumption linked to breast cancer
ConclusionOverall, this cohort study found that a higher intake of red meat was associated with higher risk of breast cancer among a large group of US female nurses. The studies strengths include the large population size, the study’s prospective nature and the fact there was a relatively long follow-up period (20 years). The researchers note limitations to their study, which should be considered when interpreting the findings. These include the fact that: the participants were predominantly white, educated US females, so caution should be taken when generalising the findings to other races or ethnic groups dietary...
Source: NHS News Feed - June 11, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Food/diet Source Type: news