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Cross-cultural validation of the Modified Falls Efficacy Scale in Serbian community-dwelling women at risk for osteoporotic fracture - Aleksic J, Zvekic-Svorcan J, Vujasinovic Stupar N, Jeremic I, Grgurevic A.
OBJECTIVE: Cross-cultural validation of the Serbian version of the Modified Falls Efficacy Scale (MFES). METHODS: This cross-sectional study involved 257 women aged 65 years and above who were referred for dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry examinati... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 6, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Elder Adults Source Type: news

BMI: Tom Brady is obese?
Your Body Mass Index (BMI) is a measurement of your body fat percentage. And based on the results, you are labeled normal, overweight or obese.   But BMI can give you some crazy results. Using this measurement, I’m considered obese. And so is NFL superstar Tom Brady. You see, BMI only compares your height against your weight. It doesn’t distinguish between fat and muscle. But here’s the thing… Muscle is much denser than fat. So if you have a lot of muscle, you can have a high BMI but still be lean. There’s a much more reliable test to measure your body’s composition of fat and mu...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - October 19, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Cathy Card Tags: Anti-Aging Source Type: news

Phase 3 Head-to-Head Trial Showed KYPROLIS ® (Carfilzomib) Significantly Improved Overall Survival Compared To Velcade® (Bortezomib) In Relapsed Or Refractory Multiple Myeloma Patients
First-and-Only Head-to-Head Study Comparing Proteasome Inhibitors to Demonstrate Statistically Significant Improved Overall Survival Detailed Results Will be Presented at the 16th International Myeloma Workshop (IMW) in New Delhi THOUSAND OAKS, Calif., Feb. 28, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Amgen (NASDAQ:AMGN) today announced positive results from a planned overall survival (OS) interim analysis of the Phase 3 head-to-head ENDEAVOR trial. The study met the key secondary endpoint of OS, demonstrating that patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma treated with KYPROLIS® (carfilzomib) and dexamethasone (Kd)...
Source: Amgen News Release - February 28, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Pro-Dex deals Oregon Micro Systems biz to GM for $640k
Pro-Dex (NSDQ:PDEX) said yesterday it sold its Oregon Micro Systems division for $640,000 to OMS Motion, a corporation formed by the division’s long time general manager Phil Brown. The Irvine, Calif.-based company’s OMS division designs and manufactures embedded multi-axis motion controllers to be sold to distributors or original equipment manufacturers in automation and research industries. “The sale of our OMS division will allow us to invest in our research and development efforts of our medical device product portfolio. We are pleased that this sale was consummated so quickly, in part due to the...
Source: Mass Device - January 31, 2017 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Mergers & Acquisitions Pro-Dex Inc. Source Type: news

Higher muscle mass associated with lower mortality risk in people with heart disease
FINDINGS Researchers from the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA found that cardiovascular disease patients who have high muscle mass and low fat mass have a lower mortality risk than those with other body compositions. The findings also suggest that regardless of a person’s level of fat mass, a higher level of muscle mass helps reduce the risk of death. This findings indicate the importance of assessing body composition as a way to help predict cardiovascular and total mortality in people with cardiovascular disease. BACKGROUND In previous studies on the relationship between body composition and mortality, the ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 19, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Reducing Healthcare Waste: Don't Expect Patients To Take The Lead
Lena Wright’s best friend was hunched over like a character from a French novel, with spinal bones so thin they would fracture with a fit of sneezing. Determined to avoid that fate, Wright (a pseudonym) asked her primary care doctor to test her for osteoporosis with a DEXA scan, also known as Dual Energy X-ray Absorption. The scan would send two X-ray beams through her bones, one high energy and the other low. The difference in how much energy passes through her bones would somehow (the wonders of physics!) allow her doctors to calculate the thickness of her skeleton. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - March 25, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Peter Ubel Source Type: news

Forget BMI. Here's A Better Tool To Measure Your Health.
Body mass index, everyone's least favorite health indicator, took another hit this week in a study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine. The study, which followed more than 50,000 middle-aged and older Canadians, found that body fat percentage is a better predictor of life expectancy than BMI. Being on the thin side or having a low BMI didn't protect against early death. In fact, mortality rates increased as BMI decreased and body fat percentage went up. "The key is that BMI does not measure fat," lead author Dr. Raj Padwal, a professor of medicine and dentistry at the University of Alberta...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 9, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Better NHS service provision 'could help prevent secondary fractures'
Improvements to current health service provisions in the UK could help hip fracture patients to minimise their risk of secondary fractures more effectively. This is according to a new study led by the University of Oxford and University of Southampton, which aimed to identify healthcare professionals' views on effective care for the prevention of secondary fracture after an initial hip injury. Currently, there is a substantial amount of variation in terms of how NHS services to prevent secondary fractures are delivered, with little consensus on the best models of care. This means that many people who have broken hips rem...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - January 14, 2016 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Do high doses of vitamin D increase falls risk in the elderly?
Conclusion This trial aimed to assess whether giving high-dose vitamin D to older adults with a high risk of falls increased their blood vitamin D levels to above 30ng/ml, as well as improving their leg function. Vitamin D levels of 20ng/ml or more are generally considered adequate for bone health. But many people are deficient in vitamin D, with the elderly being particularly at risk. Current UK recommendations say people aged over 65 should take a daily supplement of 10mcg. This is the equivalent of 400 IU a day – a lower level than the lowest dose used in this study (800 IU a day). This study looked at taking t...
Source: NHS News Feed - January 6, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Older people Medication Cancer Source Type: news

Mathematics for child health
(National Research University Higher School of Economics) The researchers set out to develop a methodology for identifying patient subgroups with significant differences in terms of response to certain treatments, specifically two types of chemotherapy, DEXA and MEDROL. The study compared patients with similar physiological profiles receiving different types of treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 21, 2015 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

10 Must-Do Health Checks For Women Over 50
This article first appeared on the Golden Girls Network blog. Earlier on Huff/Post50: -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post)
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 31, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How hopping may help with osteoporosis risk in older people
ConclusionThis was a randomised controlled trial assessing the effect on hip bone density of hopping as a form of weight-bearing exercise in older men. The study found the hopping exercise to be of significant benefit to certain parts of the hip. But this study was performed in healthy men with no health concerns. The study had a number of strengths and limitations. Strengths are that it was randomised in design, and the fact there was concealed allocation to the intervention group and blinded assessors, reducing the risk of bias. The researchers also performed calculations to estimate the number of participants neede...
Source: NHS News Feed - September 11, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Older people Lifestyle/exercise Source Type: news

Variability in DEXA Scans Limits Fracture PredictionVariability in DEXA Scans Limits Fracture Prediction
The variability in bone density measurements limits their usefulness for predicting fracture risk, researchers from Canada report. Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - February 3, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology News Source Type: news

BMI tests 'miss' over a quarter of obese children
Conclusion This systematic review and meta-analysis showed using BMI to detect excess body fat in children up to the age of 18 was not perfect. It estimated more than a quarter of children with excess body fat might not be classed as obese using BMI measurements alone. This may mean they don't get the same help and support to achieve a healthy weight as those correctly identified, and so remain at a higher risk of developing a range of weight-related diseases. BMI is known to be a far from perfect measure of body fatness, but is often a useful start, so the main conclusion of the research will be nothing new to ...
Source: NHS News Feed - October 20, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Obesity Pregnancy/child Source Type: news

Breakfast 'not the most important meal of the day'
ConclusionThis trial aimed to measure the direct effect that eating breakfast or fasting before 12am has on energy balance and indicators of cardiovascular health in people living their normal daily lives. The trail has been carefully designed study and has taken extensive body measurements to try and measure the direct effects of breakfast or fasting upon the body. However, there are limitations to bear in mind: This was a small sample size. The target sample size for the trial for it to have statistical power to reliably detect differences between the group had been 70 people – 30 in each group – with the ai...
Source: NHS News Feed - August 26, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food/diet Lifestyle/exercise Obesity Source Type: news

Health Canada OKs Hologic DEXA platform
Hologic said it has received a medical license from Health Canada for its Horizon (more) (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - August 7, 2014 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Prevalent morphometric vertebral fractures in professional male rugby players - Hind K, Birrell F, Beck B.
The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of vertebral fracture using vertebral fracture assessment (VFA) dual energy X-ray absorptiometry ... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - May 24, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Recreational and Sports Issues Source Type: news

Usefulness of bone density measurement in fallers - Blain H, Rolland Y, Beauchet O, Annweiler C, Benhamou CL, Benetos A, Berrut G, Audran M, Bendavid S, Bousson V, Briot K, Brazier M, Breuil V, Chapuis L, Chapurlat R, Cohen-Solal M, Cortet B, Dargent P, Fardellone P, Feron JM, Gauvain JB, Guggenbuhl P, Hanon O, Laroche M, Kolta S, Lespessailles E, Letombe B, Mallet E, Marcelli C, Orcel P, Puisieux F, Seret P, Souberbielle JC, Sutter B, Trémollières F, Weryha G, Roux C, Thomas T.
The objective of this systematic literature review is to discuss the latest French recommendation issued in 2012 that a fall within the past year should lead to bone mineral density (BMD) measurement using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). This recom... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - April 12, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

Could a DNA test predict obesity risk in children?
Conclusion This small cohort showed an association between chemical modification (methylation) of four sites in a gene (PCGIα) that codes for a protein involved in energy metabolism in young children, and increased body fat between the ages of nine and 14. This study has found an association, but it cannot prove that methylation was directly responsible for increased body fat. For example, while the association was still there despite accounting for sex, age, estimated physical activity levels and puberty, other factors such as diet were not assessed. A further limitation is that physical activity levels were measu...
Source: NHS News Feed - March 27, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Genetics/stem cells Obesity Pregnancy/child Source Type: news

The race against the female athlete triad
Laura on the track It’s a common belief among female runners: The lighter you are, the faster you are. It’s also believed that menstrual irregularities, or loss of periods, are a healthy part of competitive training. Neither is true. That’s precisely what Laura Duff, a senior at Colby College and an avid runner, wishes she knew when she was in high school. It was during the summer before Laura’s senior year of high school that she became more aware of how she looked. “I don’t know what switched,” she says, “I just became very aware, and started to restrict my eating and be m...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - May 13, 2013 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Andrea Mooney Tags: All posts Our patients’ stories Sports & exercise Female Athlete Program female athlete triad Kathryn Ackerman Running sports injuries Source Type: news

Have you got what it takes to be an Olympic athlete?
High tech fitness tests in a lab can work out which sports you are most suited to - and where your weaknesses might lie. Kate Carter is put through her paces to discover her potentialIn a gleaming white lab kitted out with props straight out of science fiction, I'm pounding a treadmill in a mask seemingly designed to protect against a nuclear disaster. A man in a white coat stares at a bank of screens, shouting at me to keep up the effort as I pant into the tubes.Not so long ago, identifying a potential sports star was a matter of how far you could sprint around a track, or kick a football. Now, sports scientists are routi...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 28, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Kate Carter Tags: The Guardian Fitness Health & wellbeing Features Life and style Science Source Type: news