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Fight Aging! Newsletter, May 29th 2017
In this study, we utilized an imaging-based assay to monitor the ability of disease-associated amyloid assemblies to rupture intracellular vesicles following endocytosis. We observe that the ability to induce vesicle rupture is a common feature of α-synuclein (α-syn) assemblies, as assemblies derived from wild type (WT) or familial disease-associated mutant α-syn all exhibited the ability to induce vesicle rupture. Similarly, different conformational strains of WT α-syn assemblies, but not monomeric or oligomeric forms, efficiently induced vesicle rupture following endocytosis. The ability to...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 28, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

How to Build Your Side Business While Working Full Time
You're reading How to Build Your Side Business While Working Full Time, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. Building a business is hard. What about building a business on the side while working full time? I built a freelancing business while studying dentistry, and I'm just 20 years old. And I forgot to mention that my GPA was 3.92 during my first 2 years. It seems impossible to a lot of people, but I did it. And the secret is rather simple. I know what I need to do, and I do it. But there's a bit more ...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - May 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: ahmedsafwan10 Tags: confidence featured self improvement best self-improvement blogs follow your passion How to build a business motivation tips pickthebrain side business side hustle Source Type: blogs

In Essence, All Aging Research Revolves around the Science and Advocacy of SENS, the Strategies for Engineered Negligible Senescence
Today's popular science article for consideration is the usual mix of frustrating and interesting remarks that result when various researchers are convinced to talk to the press on the subject of SENS rejuvenation research. I in no way exaggerate when I say that all approaches to the research of aging, all of the intent in aging research, all of the fundamental disagreements in the field, ultimately revolve around SENS, the Strategies for Engineered Negligible Senescence. The advocacy and the science of SENS are the moral and technological sun in this solar system, for all that many of those orbiting it apparently would ra...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 25, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Healthy Life Extension Community Source Type: blogs

Being mindful about mindfulness
I’m generally a supporter of mindfulness practice. It’s been a great discipline for me as I deal with everyday life and everything. I don’t admit to being incredibly disciplined about “making time for meditation” every day – that is, I don’t sit down and do the whole thing at a set time each day – but I do dip in and out of mindfulness throughout my day. While I’m brushing my teeth, slurping on a coffee, driving, sitting in the sun, looking at the leaves on the trees, cuddling my Sheba-dog I’ll bring myself to the present moment and take a couple of minutes to be ...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - May 21, 2017 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: adiemusfree Tags: Chronic pain Clinical reasoning Pain conditions Relaxation Resilience/Health Science in practice acceptance mindfulness persistent pain willingness Source Type: blogs

If You Think The myHR is Safe and Secure Think Again. There Are Some Weaknesses.
This appeared late last week.Your private health information is online and you don ’t even know itSue Dunlevy, National Health Reporter, News Corp Australia NetworkMay 5, 2017 10:00pmIT’S the $2 billion online health record you don’t even know you have and it could be putting your health privacy at risk.Millions of Australians are unaware they have an online My Health Record set up by the government that can reveal if they have a mental illness, sexually transmitted disease, an abortion or other embarrassing health problem.It can be accessed by 650,000 health professionals including dentists, dietitians, ...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - May 12, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: Dr David More MB PhD FACHI Source Type: blogs

Dogs Go to the Dentist to Help Kids With Autism
Bright lights shining in your eyes and a cacophony of sounds inside your mouth—the scraping sound of metal against teeth, drilling of a cavity, x-ray machines and water jets. Not to mention the feelings of all those instruments invading a place as delicate as your mouth. Going to the dentist makes many of us nervous—at the least—so imagine how a child with autism reacts to sitting in a big chair with sensory overload in all directions. One dental clinic in Santiago, Chile, is using dogs to help children with autism stay calm during their dental visits. According to an article in The Washington P...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - May 10, 2017 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Shelley D. Hutchins Tags: News Speech-Language Pathology Autism Spectrum Disorder social skils Source Type: blogs

Crash Course in Dementia Caregiving - Birmingham, Alabama
Crash Course in Dementia CaregivingFor readers in the Birmingham, Alabama area.Our expert Rita Jablonski-Jaudon will be giving this 3-hour talk designed for family caregivers of persons living with dementia. The focus will be on concrete ways to approach dementia-related behaviors (repetition, refusals, wandering, aggression, anxiety).Monday, May 15, 2017 9 am-12 noonCanterbury United Methodist Church350 Overbrook Road, Mountain Brook ALFor more information, please contact Valerie Boyd at 205-874-1523.If you are in the area I highly recommend this.You can also bring a friend or your entire support group.If you are in ...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - May 9, 2017 Category: Neurology Tags: alzheimer's care alzheimer's caregiving tips Alzheimer's Communication ’s dementia course in dementia care senior care training for alzheimer's caregivers Source Type: blogs

Dentists and Freedom in Ivory Coast
I heard a report this morning on BBC Newshour on the shortage of dentists in Ivory Coast (Cote d ’Ivoire). I can’t find the report at theNewshour website, but here ’ssomething similar from CNBCAfrica, coauthored by a Unilever representative. It ’s a sad story of disease, pain, and school absenteeism.But stories like this miss the point. Why does Ivory Coast have so few dentists? Why does the Gates Foundation need to buymosquito nets for African countries? It ’s not because there’s something special about dentists and mosquito nets. It’s because African countries are poor. And they&...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - May 2, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: David Boaz Source Type: blogs

Health Affairs Forum: Oral Health In California
In December 2016, Health Affairs journal published its first-ever theme issue dedicated to oral health. Papers examined the topic from many angles, including how to expand access to care, how to diversify the oral health workforce, and how to improve public programs to accomplish both. For the third time this year, Health Affairs is taking its health policy programming to California, where we will host a May 17 event examining the current landscape of oral health in the state. The program will highlight key articles from our theme issue, and pay particular attention to the oral health safety net for California’s adul...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - April 28, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Health Affairs Tags: Elsewhere@ Health Affairs events Oral Health Source Type: blogs

AXESS Sedation Mask Hopes to Improve Comfort, Delivery of Gases
Accutron, part of Crosstex International, itself part of Cantel Medical based in Hauppauge, NY, recently unveiled its new AXESS nitrous oxide/oxygen nasal sedation mask. The device is designed to optimize comfort, minimize anxiety particularly in children, reduce opportunities for displacement, and allow for easy access to the mouth for dental and orthodontic procedures. It’s lightweight and stays out of the way of the eyes, as well as the nostrils as it doesn’t have any protruding nipples within its interior. It works with a reusable scavenging circuit that sucks up unused gas and recycles it automatically wit...
Source: Medgadget - April 26, 2017 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Editors Tags: Anesthesiology Dentistry Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Why Don't We Have Free Trade in Doctors?
With this blog post, I ’m taking a quick break from trying to figure out President Trump’s trade policies. (Is this going to be the most protectionist presidency ever? Or will it end up looking not too different from a typical presidency? The conflicting signals are making my head spin!) Instead, I want to talk about an issue that Dean Baker keeps raising: Whether U.S. trade policymakers are hypocritical because they have liberalized a lot of trade in manufactured products such as steel, but not very much trade in professional services such as medical care. (Seehere,here,here,here,here,here, andhere for ex...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - April 24, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Simon Lester Source Type: blogs

The myHR Becomes A Touch Political Would Seem. Interesting.
This came up in the discussion re access to Opt-Out myHR Records.Media Release – Catherine King MPShadow Minister For Health And Medicare = Member For BallaratANOTHER HEALTH BUNGLE – OPEN SLATHER ON YOUR HEALTH DATA UNDER TURNBULL” The revelation that hundreds of thousands of health practitioners will be given open access to sensitive health data is extremely concerning. Reports today say that electronic health records will be automatically set to “universal access” under the Turnbull Government’s opt-out scheme, meaning health practitioners will automatically have access to an individua...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - April 19, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: Dr David More MB PhD FACHI Source Type: blogs

Despite The Sound And Fury Do We Really Know How Opt-Out Settings Are Being Set?
This article appeared last week:Optometrists and dentists will know if you ’ve had an abortion or mental illness in health record bungleSue Dunlevy, National Health Reporter, News Corp Australia NetworkApril 10, 2017 10:00pmTHE private health records of Australians can be accessed by more than half a million people under the latest bungle with the $2.2 billion electronic My Health Record.News Corp Australia has learned that the privacy settings on the government’s computerised My Health Record, which lists every medicine a patient takes and records every medical visit and procedure, are automatically set on &ld...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - April 18, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: Dr David More MB PhD FACHI Source Type: blogs

The MyHR Seems To Be Way Less Protected And Secure Than Anyone Knew – What A Mess.
This appeared this morning.Optometrists and dentists will know if you ’ve had an abortion or mental illness in health record bungleSue Dunlevy, National Health Reporter, News Corp Australia NetworkApril 10, 2017 10:00pmTHE private health records of Australians can be accessed by more than half a million people under the latest bungle with the $2.2 billion electronic My Health Record.News Corp Australia has learned that the privacy settings on the government’s computerised My Health Record, which lists every medicine a patient takes and records every medical visit and procedure, are automatically set on “u...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - April 11, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: Dr David More MB PhD FACHI Source Type: blogs

Framework for managing performer concerns
NHS England - This document provides the framework through which NHS England will oversee and manage GPs, dentists and optometrists who are registered as a performer on the NHS England national performers list. This framework is designed to be used in conjunction with the toolkit for managing performance concerns in primary care.FrameworkToolkitNHS England publications (Source: Health Management Specialist Library)
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - April 7, 2017 Category: UK Health Authors: The King ' s Fund Information & Knowledge Service Tags: Commissioning Regulation, governance and accountability Source Type: blogs

A Nation in Pain
This past week, Governor John Kasich of Ohio issued an executive order limiting the amount of opioids doctors and dentists can prescribe to no more than a 7 day supply. Failure to comply could result in disciplinary action, including loss of license. Exceptions exist only for patients with cancer or those enrolled in hospice programs. For all the rest, it represents a hard full stop. No longer will the chronic pain sufferer, the woman status post lumbar back fusion x 3, be able to get a prescription for a month's supply of oxycodone with 3 refills.On the surface this appears to be a reasonable initiativ...
Source: Buckeye Surgeon - April 2, 2017 Category: Surgery Authors: Jeffrey Parks MD FACS Source Type: blogs

Review body on doctors ’ and dentists’ remuneration - forty-fifth report 2017
This report sets out the Review Body on Doctors ’ and Dentists’ Remuneration's (DDRB) analysis of evidence given by relevant organisations and makes proposals for doctors ’ and dentists’ pay and associated issues in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. In this report the DDRB provides independent advice on the pay of doctors and dentists in the NHS to the: Prime Minister, Secretary of State for Health, First Minister of Scotland, First Minister of Wales and First Minister and Deputy First Minister of Northern Ireland.ReportDepartment of Health - publications (Source: Health Management Specialist Library)
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - March 29, 2017 Category: UK Health Authors: The King ' s Fund Information & Knowledge Service Tags: Regulation, governance and accountability Workforce and employment Source Type: blogs

Scholarships from National Health Service Corps
“You can apply to the Scholarship Program if you are committed to primary care and accepted to or enrolled in an accredited U.S. school in one of the following primary care disciplines: Physicians (MD or DO) Dentists Nurse Practitioners (post graduate degree with clinical practice focus) Certified Nurse-Midwives Physician Assistants The scholarship pays tuition, fees, other educational costs, and provides a living stipend in return for a commitment to work at least 2 years at an NHSC-approved site in a medically underserved community.” Find more information and access the application on the National Health Se...
Source: BHIC - March 27, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Annette Parde-Maass Tags: Scholarships and Grants Source Type: blogs

Long-term use of opioids may depend on the doctor who prescribes them
You may have heard of the phrase “primum non nocere” — the Latin phrase that doctors are supposed to follow that instructs them to “first, do no harm.” Doctors also have an important ethical obligation to alleviate pain. But what happens when these two mandates collide? That, unfortunately, is the case with opioid pain relievers: powerful medicines like oxycodone, hydrocodone, and hydromorphone. These medications are potent pain relievers, but this relief comes at a serious, and sometimes deadly, cost. The United States is now in the era of an “opioid epidemic” in which deaths from...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - March 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Scott Weiner, M.D. Tags: Addiction Drugs and Supplements Pain Management Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, March 27th 2017
In conclusion, DNAm of multiple disease-related genes are strongly linked to mortality outcomes. The recently established epigenetic clock (DNAm age) has received growing attention as an increasing number of studies have uncovered it to be a proxy of biological ageing and thus potentially providing a measure for assessing health and mortality. Intriguingly, we targeted mortality-related DNAm changes and did not find any overlap with previously established CpGs that are used to determine the DNAm age. Our findings are in line with evidence, suggesting that DNAm involved in ageing or health-related outcomes are mostly...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 26, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

An open letter to Psychological Medicine, again!
In conclusion, noted Wilshire et al., “the claim that patients can recover as a result of CBT and GET is not justified by the data, and is highly misleading to clinicians and patients considering these treatments.” In short, the PACE trial had null results for recovery, according to the protocol definition selected by the authors themselves. Besides the inflated recovery results reported in Psychological Medicine, the study suffered from a host of other problems, including the following: *In a paradox, the revised recovery thresholds for physical function and fatigue–two of the four recovery mea...
Source: virology blog - March 23, 2017 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Commentary Information adaptive pacing therapy CFS chronic fatigue syndrome clinical trial cognitive behavior therapy Dave Tuller exercise graded exercise therapy mecfs myalgic encephalomyelitis outcome PACE trial recovery Source Type: blogs

If You ’re an Astronaut, You Should Be Taking Lots of Vitamin D
Is space just a crazy vacuum that causes our bodies to age quickly and our bones to crumble? According toThomas Lang,MD, professor at the Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging and associate dean of research at the School of Dentistry at University of California San Francisco, space travel takes a toll on an astronaut ’s skeletal health, especially at the hip, an area susceptible to fractures for people with osteoporosis.Astronauts ’ bones deteriorate while in space because their muscles and bones cannot load in the solar system’s microgravity environment. Upon arriving back on earth, their body m...
Source: radRounds - March 23, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Functional Tooth Regrowth Demonstrated in a Canine Model
This study represents a substantial advancement in organ replacement therapy through the transplantation of bioengineered organ germ as a practical model for future whole-organ regeneration. Whole-tooth replacement therapy holds great promise for the replacement of lost teeth by reconstructing a fully functional bioengineered tooth using three-dimensional cell manipulation in vitro. It is anticipated that bioengineering technology will ultimately enable the reconstruction of fully functional organs in vitro through the proper arrangement of epithelial and mesenchymal cell components. Many researchers have attempted ...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 21, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Dr. Janet Woodcock on the Opioid Epidemic
The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) offers a podcast series, known as the Director’s Corner, that features the director of the FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER). One of the most recent episodes featured an interview with Dr. Janet Woodcock, by Colleen Labbe from the CDER Office of Communications, who discussed the way the FDA has been addressing the opioid epidemic affecting many communities around the United States. CDER’s Response to FDA Labeling Changes One of the first questions asked of Dr. Woodcock was what, exactly, CDER did with regard to the various opioid safety lab...
Source: Policy and Medicine - March 20, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs

What ’ s Behind 2.5 Million New Health Jobs?
December 2007 marked the start of the most severe recession in modern times. For more than two years, the economy shed jobs. By the start of 2010, there were 8.6 million fewer jobs than at the start of the recession. These losses would have been greater had health care employment not continued to grow; jobs outside health care fell by 9.2 million while health care added nearly 600 thousand jobs. It took until November 2014 for non-health jobs to return to their pre-recession level, at which point health jobs had grown by 1.7 million. As of January 2017, there are 2.5 million more health jobs than at the start of the recess...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - March 17, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Charles Roehrig, Ani Turner and Katherine Hempstead Tags: Costs and Spending Health Professionals Hospitals 2007 recession ambulatory care settings diagnosing and treating practitioners efficiency health sector job growth Source Type: blogs

How good is my doctor? Awards, acronyms, and anecdotes …Oh my
Choosing the right physician is critically important, but what are reliable markers for what makes a doctor good? And the award goes to… Physician recognition awards can be a funny thing. By funny I mean they at times have no real merit. I used to have an office at Somerville Hospital, and I recall receiving a letter in the mail stating, “Congratulations Paul G. Mathew, MD!!! You are one of the top neurologists in Somerville, Massachusetts.” The very official-appearing letter was accompanied by an order form for various certificates, plaques, and even Oscar-like statues that I could have purchased to dis...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - March 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Paul G. Mathew, MD, FAAN, FAHS Tags: Health care Managing your health care Source Type: blogs

How good is my doctor? Awards, acronyms, and anecdotes …Oh my
Choosing the right physician is critically important, but what are reliable markers for what makes a doctor good? And the award goes to… Physician recognition awards can be a funny thing. By funny I mean they at times have no real merit. I used to have an office at Somerville Hospital, and I recall receiving a letter in the mail stating, “Congratulations Paul G. Mathew, MD!!! You are one of the top neurologists in Somerville, Massachusetts.” The very official-appearing letter was accompanied by an order form for various certificates, plaques, and even Oscar-like statues that I could have purchased to dis...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - March 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Paul G. Mathew, MD, FAAN, FAHS Tags: Health care Managing your health care Source Type: blogs

An open letter to Psychological Medicine about “ recovery ” and the PACE trial
In conclusion, noted Wilshire et al., “the claim that patients can recover as a result of CBT and GET is not justified by the data, and is highly misleading to clinicians and patients considering these treatments.” In short, the PACE trial had null results for recovery, according to the protocol definition selected by the authors themselves. Besides the inflated recovery results reported in Psychological Medicine, the study suffered from a host of other problems, including the following: *In a paradox, the revised recovery thresholds for physical function and fatigue–two of the four recovery mea...
Source: virology blog - March 13, 2017 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Commentary Information adaptive pacing therapy CFS chronic fatigue syndrome clinical trial cognitive behavior therapy Dave Tuller exercise graded exercise therapy mecfs myalgic encephalomyelitis outcome PACE trial recovery Source Type: blogs

Method Spots Bacterial Infections in Root Canals to Improve Success, Prevent Additional Procedures
At King’s College London researchers have developed a device that can verify whether a root canal has been cleansed of bacteria following an endodontic treatment. These days dentists performing such procedures have to rely on their technique and diligence to make sure the root canal will not become diseased again. Having a tool that confirms that the bacteria is gone should help prevent further tooth decay and subsequent procedures. The SafeRoot device, a study of which was recently published in Journal of Dental Research, relies on paper points, commonly used by dentists, to sample the root canal space. Pa...
Source: Medgadget - March 11, 2017 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Editors Tags: Dentistry Source Type: blogs

Yomi, The First Robotic Dental Surgery System Now Cleared by FDA
Neocis, a company based in Miami, Florida, just announced winning FDA clearance to introduce Yomi, the first robotically assisted dental surgical system. Yomi’s software is used to plan a procedure based on a patient’s CT scan. During the procedure, the system continuously tracks the patient and controls the direction of the drill as the clinician  advances it into tissue. This is supposed to guarantee that the physician doesn’t stray away from the correct location, depth, and orientation of the plan, while still controlling the actual drill delivery. The software allows for quick plan changes, if ne...
Source: Medgadget - March 2, 2017 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Editors Tags: Dentistry Source Type: blogs

Unlocking the lock jaw: Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) dysfunction
The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is one of the most heavily utilized and underappreciated joints in the human body. Mechanically, the TMJ is what allows you to open and close your mouth, and to a lesser extent, extend and move your jaw from side to side. Functionally, it facilitates eating, talking, and facial expressions. Without a TMJ, McGruff the crime dog would not be able to “Take a bite out of crime,” and Jaws would have never become a savage predatory superstar of the deep blue sea.  Just kidding. We all know from “Shark Week” that sharks do not actually have a TMJ, but you get the idea...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - February 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Paul G. Mathew, MD, FAAN, FAHS Tags: Dental Health Headache Pain Management Source Type: blogs

Radiologists, approximately 90% Will Get Sued, so Here ’s How to Stay Cool in a Lawsuit
A misdiagnosis isn ’t a mistake radiologists can just let go of. In fact, it’s one of the most concerning and anxiety provoking issue that comes with practicing medicine. According to a study published inThe New England Journal of Medicine, 90 percent of radiologists have faced a malpractice lawsuit at least once in their career. Incorrect breast cancer diagnosis is the most common reason why patients sue — at 3.57 claims per 1,000 patients, according toresearchers from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, and nonspinal and spinal fractures, lung cancer, and vascular disease followed su...
Source: radRounds - February 15, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

First do no harm: the impact of financial incentives on dental x-rays
Centre for Health Economics (CHE) - This paper assesses the impact of financial incentives to dentists on the incidence of potentially harmful x-rays in Scotland. It finds that there are significant increases in x-rays when dentists receive fees for services rather than salary payments. ReportCHE news (Source: Health Management Specialist Library)
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - February 8, 2017 Category: UK Health Authors: The King ' s Fund Information & Knowledge Service Tags: Local authorities, public health and health inequalities NHS finances and productivity Source Type: blogs

Is Being a Radiologist Really Among the Best Jobs in the U.S.?
You might be surprised to hear what are some of the U.S. ’s top professions. According to CNN, radiology is one of the best jobs you can have. This January, the media group came out with a report detailing the top 100 jobs in the U.S. Evaluating factors such as mobility, salary, and quality of life, radiologist was determined as the 45th best job for Americans — right after dentist and before career counselor. Radiology scored an “A” in terms of “personal satisfaction”, “benefit to society”, and “telecommuting”. In terms of “low stress”, the career rec...
Source: radRounds - February 1, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 174
Just when you thought your brain could unwind on a Friday, you realise that it would rather be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF…introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 173. Clue: I hope you have built up an appetite for our FFFFs, this weeks answers are all food related. Question 1 How many calories are consumed when licking a stamp? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer expand(document.getElementById('ddet986522046'));expand(document.getElementById('ddetlink986522046')) 1/10th of a Calorie. A regular stamp has 5.9 calories but commemorative stamps hold a whopping 14.5 calories f...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - January 27, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neil Long Tags: Frivolous Friday Five candy floss dentist ketchup poison apple Stamps tomato turmeric william morrison wound healing Source Type: blogs

Chronic Pain and the Opioid Epidemic: Wicked Issues Have No Simple Solutions
Written By Myra ChristopherMy mom was a steel magnolia (i.e., southern and perfectly charming), but she had a steel rod up her back. After her first surgery for stomach cancer at age 53, she refused pain medication because she said that she “could take it.” She was young and strong and committed to “beating cancer.” After nearly two years of chemotherapy, radiation and two more surgeries, the cancer won. Eventually, I watched her beg nurses to give her “a shot” minutes before another was scheduled and be told they were sorry but she would have to wait. I could tell by the expressions on ...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 23, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Practical Bioethics Tags: Health Care chronic pain Opioid addiction Opioid Epidemic Opioid prescriptions syndicated Source Type: blogs

Bridging The Dental Divide: Overcoming Barriers To Integrating Oral Health And Primary Care
American systems of oral and systemic health—training, licensure, service delivery, and insurance—continue to operate in parallel. It is a fracture rooted in sociologic, political, and market forces rather than underlying physiology. Although the distinction may be artificial, the consequences for patients and providers are real. A growing evidence base points to the cost and quality shortfalls associated with having separate systems treat the same person. Seeking to address these challenges, the Surgeon General recently called for more thorough integration of oral health and primary care. Roughly one in five A...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - January 19, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Brian Powers, R. Bruce Donoff and Sachin H. Jain Tags: Costs and Spending Health Professionals Population Health Public Health Quality Dental Care Federally Qualified Health Centers Oral Health Primary Care Source Type: blogs

Obamacare, Trumpcare, And Your Mouth
In December, Health Affairs published a thematic issue on oral health, a first for the journal. With the timing of that issue and the presidential inauguration upon us, it is the perfect time to discuss Obamacare, Trumpcare, and your mouth. The Mouth Separated from the Body The dental-medical divide—the systemic separation of nearly all aspects of medical and dental care—began a century ago, and health care policy has historically reinforced it. In terms of coverage, dental care for adults is not an essential health benefit under the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Dental care for adults is an optional benefit in Me...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - January 13, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Marko Vujicic Tags: Featured Following the ACA Medicaid and CHIP Public Health Quality ACA repeal and replace Dental Care dental health Essential Health Benefits Medicaid expansion Oral Health Source Type: blogs

Medgadget @ CES 2017: ARA, a Toothbrush with AI
At the CES 2017, Medgadget had a chance to take a look at the new toothbrush from a French company called Kolibree. The sonic-based ARA is touted as the first toothbrush with artificial intelligence, which basically means the toothbrush connects to a smartphone app, and the app promises to make sure that brushing is thorough and all the places have been cleaned. The toothbrush sports the following features, according to the company: • Proprietary AI technology in the toothbrush • 3-D motion sensors, accelerometer, gyroscope and magnetometer • Offline data capture, date, time, duration and zones brushed ...
Source: Medgadget - January 11, 2017 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Editors Tags: Dentistry Source Type: blogs

Reform dentistry but don ’ t blindly copy the medical model
It’s always struck me as odd that the dental and medical systems are so separate. Oral health and overall health are closely interlinked, and the mouth is just as much a part of the body as anything else. A commentary in Health Affairs (The Dental-Medical Divide) by Elizabeth A. Mertz, a dental professor at UCSF does a good job of laying out the current state and what to expect going forward. While I learned from the article and agree with many of the conclusions, I do think it’s important that dentistry continue to deviate in some ways from the path followed by the medical profession. Dentists started as barbe...
Source: Health Business Blog - January 11, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: dewe67 Tags: Policy and politics innovation LANAP Source Type: blogs

GSK-3 Inhibitors Can Spur Tooth Regeneration to Fill Cavities
There are a number of very promising lines of work in dental regenerative medicine these days, in regenerating parts of teeth or whole teeth, and in preventing the causes of cavities and gum disease. Here, researchers have developed a comparatively simple approach that greatly increases the normally inadequate regeneration of damaged dentine in teeth. They went on to demonstrate that this can be used as the basis for a treatment to repair large cavities: Following trauma or an infection, the inner, soft pulp of a tooth can become exposed and infected. In order to protect the tooth from infection, a thin band of de...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 10, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Health Affairs In 2016: Editor ’s Picks
While 2017 promises to be an eventful year in health policy, it’s worth reflecting back on what we learned in 2016. As Health Affairs Editor-in-Chief, I have the pleasure of reading hundreds of articles each year — more, I’m sure, than most of our readers have time to read. I have selected my own “top ten” for 2016. The papers I chose go beyond our “most-read” and “most-shared” articles, which, this year, were disproportionately on topics related to health care costs. My list of articles covers a broad range of topics. Many of these articles analyze the effect...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - January 6, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Alan Weil Tags: Featured Once in a Weil Health Affairs journal Source Type: blogs

9 Ways to Promote Gratitude in Your Life
Gratitude is good for us every way you look at it. According to Sonja Lyubomirsky, PhD, professor of psychology at the University of California in Riverside, it boosts our happiness levels in a number of ways: by promoting the savoring of positive life experiences, by bolstering self-worth and self-esteem and thereby helping to cope with stress and trauma, by building social bonds and encouraging moral behavior, and by diminishing negative emotions and helping us adjust to new situations. Gratitude has a number of health benefits as well. “Research suggests that individuals who are grateful in their daily lives actua...
Source: World of Psychology - January 1, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Therese J. Borchard Tags: Depression Happiness Inspiration & Hope Mental Health and Wellness Mindfulness Motivation and Inspiration Self-Help Appreciation Bipolar Gratitude Journaling Loving Kindness Meditation Sonja Lyubomirsky thanks Source Type: blogs

Women Doctors Are Better
It took a study butthe truth is out, women doctors are better than men.I have always preferred women doctors. I just assumed it was because my pediatrician was a woman. The first dentist I went to was a woman - I have these vague memories of going to see her in her Boston office and getting erasers shaped like animals afterwards. If I get a choice, I usually prefer a woman doctor. Currently I have women doctors for: primary care, oncologist, endocrinologist, dentist, periodontist, therapist, meds therapist, rheumatologist, eye doctor...." People treated by a female had a 4 percent lower relative risk of dying and 5 pe...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - December 21, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: compassion doctors women doctors Source Type: blogs

8 Types of Toys for Depressed Children
Shopping for toys during the holiday season always takes a bit of resourcefulness. You need to learn what ’s new, what’s out, what’s flying off the shelves - and then carefully consider whether your purchase will add to your child’s entertainment stockpile. But if you have a child with special needs, especially one who is struggling with depression, finding the right toy can feel even more daunting.Though there are many different kinds of games and toys, here are 8 categories that I teach parents to consider thinking about when holiday shopping. These themes help with healing and are ...
Source: Dr. Deborah Serani - December 16, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Tags: children depression tips Source Type: blogs

What to Ask Your Doctor Before Taking Opioids
Every patient should ask questions when getting a new prescription. This is especially important when your doctor, dentist or other health care professional prescribes you an opioid, such as hydrocodone, oxycodone, codeine and morphine. The U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) provides information to assist health care consumers to dialog with their physicians before taking opioids. Information is also available in Spanish. Learn what to ask at https://nnlm.gov/bhic/09p3 (Source: BHIC)
Source: BHIC - December 13, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Carolyn Martin Tags: General Health Information Literacy Multilingual Public Health Source Type: blogs

Disney Research Software Turns Photos Into Digital Dental Impressions
Disney is much more than cartoons, toys, and amusement parks. The company runs a high tech research arm that often comes up with unusual and innovative devices and technologies that often have relevance to medical practice. The latest publicly announced project from Disney Research is a 3D reconstruction software that uses data gathered from photos or videos of people’s teeth to create accurate virtual models of those teeth. Dentists already have access to specialized devices that digitize the structure of teeth by taking many high quality shots of the mouth from inside and outside. These reconstructions ca...
Source: Medgadget - December 9, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Editors Tags: Dentistry Source Type: blogs

13 Scary Medical Technologies We Have to Get Used to
Disruptive technologies are taking huge leaps towards revolutionizing whole areas, also in medicine and healthcare, while we are way behind in understanding how they function and what effect they have on us. I believe we have to get used to these technologies which might turn out to be very scary at first, or even at second sight. I cannot wait to stop wasting my time driving cars and focus on my work while my automated vehicle takes me wherever I need to go. But I’m sure I’m going to be nervous in the first few dozens of trips and I will keep my eyes on the road. Disruptive technologies take time to get comfor...
Source: The Medical Futurist - December 9, 2016 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine AI artificial intelligence augmented reality exoskeletons food scanner GC1 genomics Healthcare Innovation robotics technology virtual reality Source Type: blogs

Making a Lasting Impact in Nicaragua
​By CASEY GRAVES​, MD​The Northeast Presbyterian Church (NEPC) has been organizing mission trips to Nicaragua for many years. These trips generally comprise operating roving clinics and performing ministry work in different parts of the country each year. Recently, they added a new option: The church began sending volunteers to a newly established clinic in an extremely poor community to provide affordable care, and I was one of them.   Cristo Rey was a community formed from the good intentions of the Spanish government, which carries out a significant amount of humanitarian work in Nicaragua. Many peo...
Source: Going Global - December 5, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs