Pathologists often disagree on breast biopsy results when diagnosing DCIS
(American College of Physicians) A study applying B-Path (Breast Pathology) Study results to patient populations found that pathologists disagree with one another about 8 percent of the time when diagnosing a single breast biopsy slide. Discordance was more likely in cases of DCIS or atypia, with a tendency toward overdiagnosing disease. The findings are published in Annals of Internal Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 21, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Analytics may aid treatment of ER-positive breast cancer
Image analytics software can be used to determine which women with breast cancers...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Aspirin could reduce breast density by almost 40% ISMRM 2015: DCE-MRI predicts response to breast chemo CAD boosts breast MRI sensitivity Quantitative 3D image analysis enables DCIS staging Breast density may play key role in tumor aggressiveness (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - March 16, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Women Often Overestimate Odds That Early Breast Cancer Will Return, Spread (U.S. News and World Report)
This article contains commentary fr... (Source: National Comprehensive Cancer Network)
Source: National Comprehensive Cancer Network - March 8, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Which Women With DCIS Can Forgo Radiotherapy?Which Women With DCIS Can Forgo Radiotherapy?
A prognostic scoring system identifies patients with DCIS who may have improved survival with radiation after lumpectomy, and suggests that a substantial number of patients may not need radiation. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines - February 10, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Dana-Farber using new grant to study less-is-more approach to breast cancer
For years, oncologists have aggressively treated an early form of non-invasive breast cancer with surgery and radiation, carving out any part of the breast that was deemed to be a future risk. But with a $13.3 million grant from the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute will study whether such aggressive treatments are necessary for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), and if a wait-and-see approach leads to better outcomes for the patient. Approximately 60,000… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - February 8, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Jessica Bartlett Source Type: news

DCIS Prognostic Score Associated With Radiotherapy Survival BenefitDCIS Prognostic Score Associated With Radiotherapy Survival Benefit
A simple prognostic score identifies women with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) who will derive a survival benefit from radiotherapy after breast-conserving therapy, according to a longitudinal study. Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Radiology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Radiology Headlines - February 5, 2016 Category: Radiology Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

What's the best treatment for very early signs of breast cancer? Duke U. researchers want to know
With help from a $13.4 million award, Duke medical researchers will try to learn more about how to treat women with very early signs of breast cancer – an issue of no small debate in the oncology world. Specifically, the research will look at ductal carcinoma in situ, or DCIS, a collection of abnormal cells found in breast ducts, but that have not spread. Some 60,000 women are diagnosed annually with DCIS, however there is growing research that indicates these women would never develop breast… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - February 4, 2016 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Jason deBruyn Source Type: news

New study to examine how to treat early breast cancer
A Duke University researcher is launching a U.S. study that will investigate...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Mammo false-positive rate highest in younger women Rates of high-grade DCIS increase with age Various DCIS treatments produce similar survival rates Kopans: JAMA Oncology paper misinterprets DCIS data Study: DCIS is more deadly than thought (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - February 4, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Study Aims to Resolve How To Manage Pre-Cancers of the Breast
This study will provide so many answers to questions that are critical to resolve,” Hwang said. “One of the key features is the assessment of patient-reported outcomes with each approach, as we believe how patients view their disease and their care must be central to any advances in cancer treatment.” The funding award for the DCIS study has been approved pending completion of a business and programmatic review by PCORI staff and issuance of a formal award contract. PHOTO: Shelley Hwang, M.D., Duke Cancer Institute and Duke Department of Surgery. CREDIT: Duke Health. (Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features)
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - February 4, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

MD Anderson shares in $13.4 million award to study treatment for low-grade DCIS
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) Researchers at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer will share in a funding award of $13.4 million with hopes of answering one of the biggest questions in the current management of breast cancer: do women with the earliest form of the disease, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), need invasive surgery? (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 2, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Your NEJM Group Today: Surgery for Breast DCIS, Aspirin for Staph Infection, Seattle Primary Care/Emergency Medicine Opportunity (FREE)
By the Editors NEJM Group offers so many valuable resources for practicing clinicians. Here's what we chose for you today:NEJM Clinical Practice Center: Clinical Decisions: Is surgery … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - February 2, 2016 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Does radiation therapy improve survival for women with ductal carcinoma in situ?
(Brigham and Women's Hospital) Investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have found that a set of easily measurable risk factors can predict the magnitude of survival benefit offered by radiation therapy following breast cancer surgery. Their results appear online in The Journal of Clinical Oncology on Feb. 1. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 1, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Does Radiation Therapy Improve Survival for Women with Ductal Carcinoma in Situ (DCIS)? Yes...and...No.
Set of risk factors predict which patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) will see a survival benefit from radiation therapy after breast cancer surgery. (Source: BWH News)
Source: BWH News - February 1, 2016 Category: Hospital Management Source Type: news

Does Radiation Therapy Improve Survival for Women with Ductal Carcinoma in Situ (DCIS)? Yes...and...No.
Set of risk factors predict which patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) will see a survival benefit from radiation therapy after breast cancer surgery. (Source: BWH for Journalists)
Source: BWH for Journalists - February 1, 2016 Category: Research Source Type: news

Does Radiation Therapy Improve Survival for Women with Ductal Carcinoma in Situ (DCIS)? Yes...and...No. (Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center)
Approximately 60,000 patients in the United States will receive a diagnosis of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in 2016. DCIS is not an invasive form of cancer and the 10-year survival rate for women with DCIS is greater than 98 percent. However, incidence of DCIS has increased dramatically over the last three decades, and being able to determine which women are among the small percentage at higher risk of breast cancer recurrence and mortality could help clinicians and patients tailor treatment ... (Source: National Comprehensive Cancer Network)
Source: National Comprehensive Cancer Network - February 1, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news