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Letermovir (Prevymis) Okayed for Stem Cell Transplant Infection Letermovir (Prevymis) Okayed for Stem Cell Transplant Infection
The drug prevents cytomegalovirus infections and disease in adults previously exposed to the common virus who have received an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant.FDA Approvals (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - November 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Alert Source Type: news

FDA Approves Prevymis (letermovir) for Prevention of Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Infection and Disease in Adult Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant Patients
KENILWORTH, N.J.--(BUSINESS WIRE) November 9, 2017 --Merck& Co., Inc. (NYSE: MRK), known as MSD outside the United States and Canada, today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Prevymis (letermovir) once-daily... (Source: Drugs.com - New Drug Approvals)
Source: Drugs.com - New Drug Approvals - November 9, 2017 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

Study: therapists lack knowledge to prevent transmission of CMV
(Midwestern University) Results from a new health-risk knowledge survey indicate that physical and occupational therapists are at increased risk of contracting cytomegalovirus (CMV), a leading cause of prenatal infection and lifelong disabilities, but that they lack sufficient knowledge to prevent its transmission. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 4, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Immune system cells protect against CMV-induced hearing loss in mice
(PLOS) Immune system cells known as natural killer cells play an important protective role against hearing loss in mice infected with cytomegalovirus (CMV), according to a new study published in PLOS Pathogens. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 28, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

What Causes Microcephaly?
Patient Presentation A 5-month-old male came to clinic for his health supervision visit and followup from his neonatal intensive care stay. He was born prematurely at 28 weeks gestation and his stay was complicated by a right sided Grade III intraventricular hemorrhage, a left-sided Grade IV intraventricular hemorrhage, neonatal seizures, respiratory distress and bronchopulmonary dysplasia, retinopathy of prematurity, acute kidney injury that had resolved, possible necrotizing enterocolitis incidents x 2, and herpes simplex encephalitis. He was on home oxygen, a nasogastric feeding tube because of aspiration risk and mult...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - September 25, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Treating a little-known virus, CMV, to combat hearing loss in children
(University of Utah Health) A National Institutes of Health-supported nationwide clinical trial will test a novel approach to combat hearing loss in children infected by a relatively unknown virus, cytomegalovirus (CMV). The University of Utah Health-led study will determine whether antiviral therapy can halt progressive hearing loss in children with a confirmed CMV infection. CMV is the leading non-genetic cause of hearing loss, contributing from 6 to 30 percent of childhood cases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 14, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Team led by UCLA, UCSF receives $8 million to study virus that often strikes after kidney transplants
UCLA, UC San Francisco and City of Hope have received a five-year, $8 million grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to study how a common virus called cytomegalovirus may provoke the immune system to reject transplanted kidneys.The 14-member interdisciplinary team is co-led by Elaine Reed, who holds the Daljit S. and Elaine Sarkaria Endowed Chair in Diagnostic Medicine at UCLA and is director of the UCLA Immunogenetics Center.  “Nearly 70 percent of people around the world carry antibodies to the cytomegalovirus infection, yet healthy people rarely display symptoms,” said Ree...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 24, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

NIAID herpesvirus study in mice leads to discovery of potential broad-spectrum antiviral
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) NIAID scientists studying herpes simplex virus infection have unexpectedly found that inhibiting a cellular enzyme complex, EZH2/1, suppresses viral infection. The researchers then demonstrated that EZH2/1 inhibitors also enhanced the cellular antiviral response in cultured cells and mice. They then showed that EZH2/1 inhibitors suppressed HSV infection, spread, and reactivation in mice and, in cell culture, suppressed human cytomegalovirus, adenovirus, and Zika virus infections. They suggest that EZH2/1 inhibitors have considerable potential as broad-spectrum ant...
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Issues with maternal screening for congenital cytomegalovirus infection
(Kobe University) Human cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a common virus found worldwide. When CMV infects fetuses, it can cause serious complications such as hearing difficulties and mental retardation in affected infants. A group of researchers have evaluated for the first time the efficacy of maternal universal screening using CMV IgG avidity tests for congenital CMV infection, and they have also identified issues with the current maternal CMV screening methods. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 24, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

What Conditions is Erythema Nodosum Associated With?
Patient Presentation A 12-year-old male came to clinic with a history of 3-4 days of painful bruising on his shin and lower arms. He had Streptocococcal pharyngitis diagnosed by rapid strep testing approximately 4 weeks previously and had taken all of his amoxicillin antibiotic per his parents. He had recovered without any problems until 3-4 days ago when his legs and arms started to have painful bruises along the shins and lower arms. They were raised, red/purple and painful mainly in the center of the lesions. He denied pain elsewhere nor any fever (Tmax was 99.5F), chills, sweats, weight loss, joint stiffness, abdomina...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - July 24, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Atomic structure of the human cytomegalovirus capsid with its securing tegument layer of pp150
Herpesviruses possess a genome-pressurized capsid. The 235-kilobase genome of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is by far the largest of any herpesvirus, yet it has been unclear how its capsid, which is similar in size to those of other herpesviruses, is stabilized. Here we report a HCMV atomic structure consisting of the herpesvirus-conserved capsid proteins MCP, Tri1, Tri2, and SCP and the HCMV-specific tegument protein pp150—totaling ~4000 molecules and 62 different conformers. MCPs manifest as a complex of insertions around a bacteriophage HK97 gp5–like domain, which gives rise to three classes of capsid floor&n...
Source: ScienceNOW - June 29, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Yu, X., Jih, J., Jiang, J., Zhou, Z. H. Tags: Biochemistry, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

HIV-positive women with cytomegalovirus likelier to pass virus that causes AIDS to infant
HIV-positive women with cytomegalovirus, or CMV, in their urine at the time of labor and delivery are more than five times likelier than HIV-positive women without CMV to transmit HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, to their infants, according to a UCLA-led study.The research also found that they are nearly 30 times likelier to transmit cytomegalovirus to their infants.Dr. Karin Nielsen, a professor of clinical pediatrics in the division of infectious diseases at theDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, is the senior author of the study, which was published today in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases.“The findi...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 22, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

HIV-positive women with cytomegalovirus likelier to pass virus that causes AIDS to infant
(University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences) HIV-positive women with cytomegalovirus, or CMV, in their urine at the time of labor and delivery are more than five times likelier than HIV-positive women without CMV to transmit HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, to their infants. The research also found that they are nearly 30 times likelier to transmit cytomegalovirus to their infants. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 21, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection: Management Update Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection: Management Update
This review provides an update on the available management strategies for congenital cytomegalovirus infection and discusses promising new treatment options.Current Opinion in Infectious Diseases (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - June 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases Journal Article Source Type: news

Disease Awareness Months Work, Even If You Don't Wear The Ribbon
June ​is the month for more than 10 disease-related awareness campaigns, including Myasthenia Gravis Awareness Month, National Congenital Cytomegalovirus Awareness Month and National Scleroderma Awareness Month. It also hosts a handful of awareness weeks and days, ranging from Helen Keller Deaf-Blind Awareness Week to World Sickle Cell Day. June’s awareness list is shorter than most, but every month is full of diseases and disorders to take note of. You probably haven’t heard of half of them, and you’re not alone. So what’s the point of an awareness day, week or month? To understand the chall...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Virus study targets infection linked to birth defects
Fresh insights into how a common virus replicates could pave the way for new therapies to stop its spread. Scientists have discovered a key molecule linked to Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection, which is harmless for healthy people but can cause miscarriage and birth defects during pregnancy. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 15, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Virus study targets infection linked to birth defects
(University of Edinburgh) Fresh insights into how a common virus replicates could pave the way for new therapies to stop its spread. Scientists at the University of Edinburgh have discovered a key molecule linked to Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection, which is harmless for healthy people but can cause miscarriage and birth defects during pregnancy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 15, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scientists ID human protein essential for human cytomegalovirus replication
Scientists have demonstrated that a human protein known as valosin containing protein (VCP) is essential for replication of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). The findings identify VCP as a potential new treatment target. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 11, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Scientists ID human protein essential for human cytomegalovirus replication
(PLOS) Scientists have demonstrated that a human protein known as valosin containing protein (VCP) is essential for replication of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). The findings, published in PLOS Pathogens, identify VCP as a potential new treatment target. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 11, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Vaccine/Chemotherapy Combination Improves Survival in Glioblastoma
Cytomegalovirus targeted vaccination plus high-dose chemotherapy with temozolomide can lead to long-term progression-free and overall survival in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - April 16, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Mark L. Fuerst Tags: Brain Tumors News Source Type: news

Glioblastoma patients may benefit from a vaccine-chemotherapy combination
(American Association for Cancer Research) A vaccine targeting cytomegalovirus (CMV) antigen pp65, combined with high-dose chemotherapy (temozolomide), improved both progression-free survival and overall survival for a small group of glioblastoma (GBM) patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 14, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Virus vs. host: Exposing an evolutionary arms race
Scientists have solved a 40-year old mystery and shed light on an evolutionary arms race played out between cytomegalovirus (CMV) and the immune system. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 10, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

The Boston Marathon: Brave and beyond
Brave. It’s the word inscribed on the simple band Mary Tremper wears on her left wrist. The band is a reminder from her son Shane that she possesses the strength and courage to bravely face the future. When Mary, a Boston Children’s Hospital Miles for Miracles runner, found the band in the hospital gift shop she knew it was from Shane. And as Mary has shared her son’s story with her teammates and listened to theirs, they have redefined brave, together. A few of their stories, including the Tremper’s, follow. Brave: Remembering Shane Shane in the Boston Children’s NICU. “I run for Shane. ...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - April 10, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Lisa Fratt Tags: Our Patients’ Stories Liver transplant NICU RSV Source Type: news

Virus vs. host -- New research exposes an evolutionary arms race
(Monash University) Imaging CoE scientists have solved a 40-year old mystery and shed light on an evolutionary arms race played out between cytomegalovirus (CMV) and the immune system. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 9, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

What Causes Uveitis?
Discussion Inflammation of the middle layer of the eye, or uvea, is termed uveitis. Uveitis can be divided into anterior, intermediate or posterior uveitis by involving the anterior (iris and ciliary body), intermediate (vitreous) or posterior (choroid and usually retina) compartments. Panuveitis involves all 3 compartments. Duration can also be used to classify uveitis. Acute is 6 weeks and> 3 months is chronic persistent uveitis. Episodic periods of inactivity and reactivity that last more than 3 months are called recurrent uveitis. A third way to characterize uveitis is if it is granulomatous or not. Uveitis increase...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - April 3, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Atara Bio Expands Management Team, Appoints Joe Newell as Executive Vice President, Chief Technical Operations Officer
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, Calif., April 03, 2017 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- Atara Biotherapeutics, Inc. (ATRA), a biopharmaceutical company developing meaningful therapies for patients with severe and life-threatening diseases that have been u... Biopharmaceuticals, Personnel Atara Biotherapeutics, Epstein-Barr Virus, Cytomegalovirus (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - April 3, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Study Casts Doubt on a Brain Cancer ’ s Link to Herpes
Researchers find no evidence of cytomegalovirus in tumor tissue (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - March 7, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: webmaster at doctorslounge.com Tags: Infections, Neurology, Oncology, News, Source Type: news

Study Casts Doubt on A Brain Cancer's Link to Herpes
Researchers find no evidence of cytomegalovirus in tumor tissue Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Brain Tumors, Cytomegalovirus Infections (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - March 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study Casts Doubt on a Brain Cancer ’ s Link to Herpes
Researchers find no evidence of cytomegalovirus in tumor tissue (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - March 6, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: webmaster at doctorslounge.com Tags: Infections, Neurology, Oncology, News, Source Type: news

Study finds no evidence of common herpes type virus in aggressive brain cancer tissue
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) In a rigorous study of tumor tissue collected from 125 patients with aggressive brain cancers, researchers at Johns Hopkins say they have found no evidence of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and conclude that a link between the two diseases, as claimed by earlier reports, likely does not exist. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 28, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Merck ’s letermovir meets primary endpoint in Phase III trial to prevent CMV infection
Healthcare firm Merck has reported positive results from the Phase III clinical trial of anti-viral drug letermovir to prevent cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in recipients of bone marrow transplant. (Source: Drug Development Technology)
Source: Drug Development Technology - February 28, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Merck ’s Letermovir, an Investigational Antiviral Medicine for Prevention of Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Infection in Bone Marrow Transplant Recipients, Highly Effective Through Week 24 Post-Transplant in Pivotal Phase 3 Study
Dateline City: KENILWORTH, N.J. Letermovir Prophylaxis Associated with Lower All-Cause Mortality Through Week 24 Post-Transplant Company Plans to Submit New Drug Applications for Letermovir in U.S. and EU in 2017KENILWORTH, N.J.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Merck& Co., Inc. (NYSE:MRK), known as MSD outside the United States and Canada, today announced results of the pivotal Phase 3 clinical study of letermovir, an investigational antiviral medicine for the prevention of clinically-significant cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in adult (18 years and older) CMV-seropositive recipients of an allogeneic hematopo...
Source: Merck.com - Research and Development News - February 26, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Research and Development News Corporate News Latest News #Merck #MRK $MRK Letermovir MSD NYSE:MRK Source Type: news

New antiviral drug cuts cytomegalovirus infection, improves survival in patients undergoing donor stem cell transplant
In a significant advance in improving the safety of donor stem cell transplants, a major clinical trial has shown that a novel agent can protect against the most common viral infection that patients face after transplantation. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - February 24, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Ties: My Daughter ’ s Silent Virus: Congenital CMV
To protect your baby from a disabling disease, first you have to know that it exists. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - February 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: MEGAN NIX Tags: Cytomegalovirus Pregnancy and Childbirth Ears and Hearing Deafness Disabilities Cochlear Implants Families and Family Life Source Type: news

Link between herpes in pregnancy and autism is unconfirmed
Conclusion This was a Norwegian case-control study that looked at whether maternal infections during pregnancy are associated with the risk of neurological developmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) in their children. The study initially found no association between any of the pathogens during pregnancy or after delivery, and the development of ASD in boys or girls. Further investigations suggested that high levels of HSV-2 virus antibodies during mid-pregnancy were associated with increased risk of the development of ASD in boys. The researchers suggest that the suspected risk of ASD associated wit...
Source: NHS News Feed - February 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pregnancy/child Neurology Mental health Source Type: news

New antiviral drug cuts cytomegalovirus infection and improves survival in patients
(Dana-Farber Cancer Institute) In a significant advance in improving the safety of donor stem cell transplants, a major clinical trial led by researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute has shown that a novel agent can protect against the most common viral infection that patients face after transplantation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 24, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Merck drug prevents serious infection after marrow transplant: study
(Reuters) - An experimental Merck& Co drug succeeded in preventing clinically serious cytomegalovirus (CMV) following bone marrow transplant and was associated with a lower death rate compared with placebo in a late state study, the company said. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - February 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Common Virus May Be Linked to Heart Disease, Diabetes in Some Women
CMV associated with increased chances of metabolic syndrome in those of normal weight Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Cytomegalovirus Infections, Metabolic Syndrome, Women's Health (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - February 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Ocular Complications of Congenital Infections
This article summarizes the ocular complications of the 5 infections typically represented by the acronym TORCHES (toxoplasmosis, rubella, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex, and syphilis), as well as others, including newer pathogens such as the human immunodeficiency, West Nile, and Zika viruses. (Source: NeoReviews recent issues)
Source: NeoReviews recent issues - January 31, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Khazaeni, L. M. Tags: Pediatric Drug Labeling Update Articles Source Type: news

January is Birth Defects Prevention Month
Untitled by Tim Bish is licensed under CC0. January is Birth Defects Prevention Month and several states in our region want to inform residents about what can be done. In the U.S., birth defects affect 1 in 33 babies and cause 1 in 5 infant deaths every year, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and the National Birth Defects Prevention Network (NBDPN). The Oklahoma State Department of Health (OSDH), in partnership with NBDPN, hopes to raise awareness for infections like cytomegalovirus (CMV), which can cause birth defects. CMV is a common infection which affects more than half of U.S. adults by age 40 and whi...
Source: Network News - January 26, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Brian Leaf Tags: General (all entries) Health Literacy Oklahoma Public Health Resources Source Type: news

Law aiding infants at risk for hearing loss
A Utah law has led to increased early identification of infants with hearing loss due to a congenital infection, according to a new study. The study is the first to assess how implementation of a state-wide screening can pick up hearing loss in infants due to congenital cytomegalovirus. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - January 24, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Researchers develop new compound to fight cytomegalovirus
A Retro94-based compound may prevent a common and sometimes fatal virus -- human cytomegalovirus (CMV) -- from reproducing and help to protect immunocompromised patients, such as those with HIV, on chemotherapy, with transplants, and infants from the effects of the disease, according to researchers. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - January 10, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

ViraCyte Granted U.S. FDA Fast Track Designation for Viralym-C
SAN FRANSICSCO, Jan. 10, 2017 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- ViraCyte, LLC today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted Fast Track designation for Viralym-C, ViraCyte's T cell immunotherapy product designed to... Biopharmaceuticals, FDA ViraCyte, Viralym-C, immunotherapy, cytomegalovirus (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - January 10, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Researchers develop new compound to fight cytomegalovirus
(Penn State) A Retro94-based compound may prevent a common and sometimes fatal virus -- human cytomegalovirus (CMV) -- from reproducing and help to protect immunocompromised patients, such as those with HIV, on chemotherapy, with transplants, and infants from the effects of the disease, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 10, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Genetic mutations could increase risk of cytomegalovirus infection
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) Experimenting with human cells and mice, Johns Hopkins researchers have found that a genetic mutation that alters a protein called NOD1 may increase susceptibility to human cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. CMV is a common pathogen that infects almost 60 percent of adults in the US, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and can lead to devastating developmental defects in fetuses and severe disease in people with weakened immune systems. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 20, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Congenital herpes virus tied to common childhood cancer
Children who develop acute lymphoblastic leukemia are over three times more likely to have tested positive for cytomegalovirus at birth, a new study shows. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 19, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Blood / Hematology Source Type: news

Woman who got 'a bad cold' during pregnancy is shocked to discover she passed common but little-known virus to her unborn baby which left him profoundly deaf
Queensland mother Rebekka Murray contracted Cytomegalovirus (CMV) for the first time while pregnant, passing the virus on to her unborn baby. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 19, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Herpes virus linked to most common type of childhood cancer
Congenital cytomegalovirus infection may increase risk of developing acute lymphocytic leukaemia Related items fromOnMedica Cold sore virus could kill cancer New guidelines on managing genital herpes in pregnancy Scientists find genetic signature linked to leukaemia Breastfeeding could cut children ’s leukaemia risk Prophylactic antibiotics help children with leukaemia (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - December 15, 2016 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Herpes virus linked to most common type of childhood cancer
Newborns with congenital cytomegalovirus -- a common virus in the herpes family -- may have an increased risk of developing acute lymphocytic leukemia, according to new research. The study suggests the risk is even greater in Hispanic children. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - December 15, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Herpes virus linked to most common type of childhood cancer
(American Society of Hematology) Newborns with congenital cytomegalovirus -- a common virus in the herpes family -- may have an increased risk of developing acute lymphocytic leukemia, according to new research published online today in Blood, the Journal of the American Society of Hematology. The study suggests the risk is even greater in Hispanic children. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 15, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news