Pilchard Curry
When Mrs Sciencebase was a student, she used to make an inexpensive curry: tin of pilchards, tin of tomatoes, chopped onion, crushed clove of garlic, teaspoon each of cumin, coriander, and turmeric powder, salt & pepper, and a half a teaspoon of chili powder. Served on a bed of whole-grain boiled rice. It sounded a bit grim, but wasn’t too bad. (Brown-bread icecream for pudding or Granny Grape Pudding). It was all certainly a whole lot more adventurous than the boiled noodles and soy sauce I once cooked her because I had nothing else in the cupboard. Don’t know if it compares well with a camping meal we onc...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - November 23, 2022 Category: Science Authors: David Bradley Tags: Food Source Type: blogs

Foraged Sumac / Ottolenghi ’s Gigli with Chickpeas & Za ’atar
I first encountered wild sumac in 2015 in Pennsylvania’s Loyalsock Forest. I’ve foraged for it most summers since, both there and along the Pine Creek Rail Trail. This year’s sumac crop was a little disappointing. Despite how much I picked, most of the fruits had worm infestations that limited the amount of usable berries. (Note to self – pick sooner in the season next year…) Still, I got about a cup and a half of dried sumac for my efforts, more than enough for my needs. (If you want to know how to harvest and dry sumac to make the spice, read here.) I used the fruits of...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - September 7, 2022 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Pasta Rice & Potatoes Chickpeas Ottolenghi Sumac za'atar Source Type: blogs

Foraged Sumac / Ottolenghi ’s Gigli with Chickpeas & Za ’atar
I first encountered wild sumac in 2015 in Pennsylvania’s Loyalsock Forest. I’ve foraged for it most summers since, both there and along the Pine Creek Rail Trail. This year’s sumac crop was a little disappointing. Despite how much I picked, most of the fruits had worm infestations that limited the amount of usable berries. (Note to self – pick sooner in the season next year…) Still, I got about a cup and a half of dried sumac for my efforts, more than enough for my needs. (If you want to know how to harvest and dry sumac to make the spice, read here.) I used the fruits of...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - September 7, 2022 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Pasta Rice & Potatoes Chickpeas Ottolenghi Sumac za'atar Source Type: blogs

21 spices for healthy holiday foods
The holiday season is one of the hardest times of the year to resist salty, fatty, sugary foods. Who doesn’t want to enjoy the special dishes and treats that evoke memories and meaning — especially during the pandemic? Physical distancing and canceled gatherings may make you feel that indulging is a way to pull some joy out of the season. But stay strong. While it’s okay to have an occasional bite or two of marbled roast beef, buttery mashed potatoes, or chocolate pie, gorging on them frequently can lead to weight gain, and increased blood pressure, blood sugar, and “bad” LDL cholesterol. Instead, skip the butter...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - December 4, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Heidi Godman Tags: Health Healthy Eating Heart Health Inflammation Nutrition Source Type: blogs

Chemicals and Pregnant Women: Taking Care of Your Unborn Baby
This study is not a warning of a scary new epidemic of problems arriving with next year’s babies. Instead, it’s a peak behind the curtain at what might be the hidden story behind the marvelous kids we already see on today’s playgrounds across the country. Most are very healthy – among the healthiest kids in history. Yes, too many are overweight. Too many have asthma. Too many have allergies. Too many have learning problems. Too many start puberty early. More than half have some chronic illness. But this isn’t slowing kids down as much as the devastating infectious diseases of the past. It is a vib...
Source: Conversations with Dr Greene - May 25, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Alan Greene MD Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

6 self-care steps for a pandemic — always important, now essential
Airline attendants say it well: if the plane hits turbulence and the oxygen masks come down, place a mask on yourself first before turning to help others. This is absolutely critical. If we don’t, we may not be able to help anyone. Well, we’ve all hit the same turbulence, folks, and we all need to take good care of ourselves, our bodies, and our minds. Healthcare providers on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic absolutely have to be functioning well in order to do their jobs well. At such a stressful time, with so much change and uncertainty, combined with the pressures of patient care during this pandemic, it ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - April 16, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Monique Tello, MD, MPH Tags: Exercise and Fitness Health Healthy Eating Mental Health Source Type: blogs

Try These 6 Vegetables for Ultimate Body & Mind Health
It seems unlikely that our digestive tracts would be a major intersection of body and mind—but recent research has shown that they are. The makeup of the microbiome in your gut—all the bacterial flora in your digestive tract—turns out to be a major player in overall health. And when we say health, we mean everything, from cognition and emotional wellbeing to cardiovascular fitness and the prevention or reduction of chronic disease. It’s thought that your body’s microbiome is largely established in the first thousand days of life. But because this system gets so much input every day from you—and because differe...
Source: World of Psychology - October 6, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Health-related Publishers Spirituality & Health Cognition digestive tract Emotional Wellbeing gut bacteria Inflammation microbiome Source Type: blogs

Ottolenghi Hummus
This hummus recipe from Yoman Ottolenghi and Sami Tamini’s Jerusalem cookbook is hands down the best, creamiest hummus I’ve ever made or eaten. The recipe uses dried chickpeas – which require an overnight soak – so you’ll need to plan ahead, probably the only downside to this amazing recipe. Lest you try to shortcut it, know that I’ve made this recipe with both canned and cooked chickpeas, and can attest that starting with dried chickpeas makes a superior hummus. It’s a lighter color and flavor, much softer and just plain better. You can tweak the recipe to your taste by ma...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - August 8, 2019 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Uncategorized Chickpeas hummus Source Type: blogs

The DASH diet: A great way to eat foods that are healthy AND delicious
The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet is an eating plan based on eating plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables, and choosing lean proteins, low-fat dairy, beans, nuts, and vegetable oils, while limiting sweets and foods high in saturated fats. A recent study published the American Journal of Preventive Medicine found that men and women younger than 75 who most closely followed the DASH diet had a significantly lower risk of heart failure compared to study participants who did not follow the DASH diet. Currently, about 5.7 million adults in the United States have heart failure, and about half of those who d...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - July 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Katherine D. McManus, MS, RD, LDN Tags: Food as medicine Health Healthy Eating Heart Health Source Type: blogs

Eat more plants, fewer animals
Science has shown us over and over again that the more meat we eat, the higher our risk of diabetes, heart disease, and strokes. Conversely, the more fruits and vegetables we eat, the lower our risk for these diseases, and the lower our body mass index. Why is eating meat bad? High-quality research shows that red meats (like beef, lamb, pork) and processed meats (bacon, sausage, deli meats) are metabolized to toxins that cause damage to our blood vessels and other organs. This toxic process has been linked to heart disease and diabetes. (Want to know more? Read about how these animal proteins harm the body here and here). ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - November 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Monique Tello, MD, MPH Tags: Food as medicine Health Healthy Eating Source Type: blogs

Love those legumes!
“Legumes” sounds like such a fancy word.  Let’s clarify that we’re talking about beans, folks. Beans, lentils, peas, chickpeas, it’s all good… and good for you.  Legumes are amazingly nutritious, high in protein and fiber, low in fat, and low in glycemic load. Legumes for heart health Scientific studies have definitively linked a diet high in legumes with a lower risk of developing obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, heart disease, or strokes. As a matter of fact, eating legumes every day can effectively treat these diseases in people who already have them. In one randomized controlled c...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - October 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Monique Tello, MD, MPH Tags: Food as medicine Healthy Eating Source Type: blogs

Tomato Jam
My sisters and I are planning on putting up a some tomato jam next weekend. Before we invest a whole afternoon (and 22 pounds of tomatoes) to it, I figured I should try out the recipe at least once. I had the loveliest afternoon doing it. A gorgeous, sunny day, with the breeze coming in through the kitchen window, a batch of bread rising on the counter, NPR playing in the background, and me shuttling back and forth between the kitchen and the den, where I’m working on a little writing project that I’ll hopefully tell you about one of these days soon. It was one sweet day. As sweet as this jam – sweet and ...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - September 5, 2017 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Canning Recipes Source Type: blogs

My current protocol
I have been getting quite a number of requests from blog readers wanting to know more or less the same things: how much curcumin I take, how I take it (with a fat, with cocoa, etc.)…and so on and so forth… Instead of replying to each and every one of you, which would take heaps of time, I decided to write a quick post today about this issue. Dosage: Every day I take 8 grams of C3 Complex curcumin = the curcumin that has been used in the MM, SMM, and MGUS clinical trials. As for brands, I prefer Doctor’s Best, simply because of its easy-to-take one-gram tablets, which you can sometimes find at a relativel...
Source: Margaret's Corner - June 29, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll curcumin protocol Source Type: blogs