The iovera ° Cryoanalgesia Device: Interview with Tim Still, CEO of Myoscience
Myoscience, a medtech company based in California, has developed the iovera° cryoanalgesia device. The device was FDA cleared in 2013, with an additional clearance in 2017 for knee pain, and uses cryotherapy to freeze peripheral nerves to reduce pain without affecting nearby tissues. The company claims that the device is a useful alternative to opioid therapy for chronic pain. The iovera° is handheld, and can deliver precise, controlled doses of cryotherapy to specific sensory nerves through a series of needles. The needles create a cold zone around the nerve which is −20°C (-4° F). This causes the my...
Source: Medgadget - March 28, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Exclusive Orthopedic Surgery Pain Management Source Type: blogs

Can Money Buy You Longevity And Health?
Better treatment options, dietary conditions and (perhaps) less stress could make the life of the rich also healthier. However, when it comes to longevity and aging, do they really have better chances? Can the upper 0.1 percent secure their health for long decades or even reverse the process of growing old? Could society somehow also benefit from the quest of the richest for longevity? Are health and longevity on the shopping list? You can have an awful lot of things with money. For a starter, you can buy ice cream or Nutella, which are synonymous to self-love, so the Beatles was only partly right in singing that you can&r...
Source: The Medical Futurist - November 22, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Bioethics Cyborgization Future of Medicine Medical Professionals Patients Policy Makers age aging aging research blood eternal life genetics immortality Innovation life sciences longevity silicon valley stem cell Source Type: blogs

MKSAP: 34-year-old man with slow-growing lesions
Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 34-year-old man is evaluated for several slow-growing lesions on his penis. He first noticed the wart-like growths 3 years ago, and they have progressively enlarged. He was treated with topical cryotherapy six times and topical imiquimod over the past year without improvement; the lesions have continued to enlarge. Medical history is significant for HIV infection. Medications are tenofovir, emtricitabine, and efavirenz. On physical examination, vital signs are normal. Multiple red to brown verrucous pa...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 20, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/mksap" rel="tag" > mksap < /a > Tags: Conditions Infectious Disease Source Type: blogs

Are You Going To Wake Up From Cryosleep?
More than 300 people let their bodies have cooled down to -200 Celsius and preserved in liquid nitrogen in the hope that someday in the future, science will be able to cheat death and make them wake up from their Sleeping Beauty state. As of today, no one knows whether they will ever have the chance for a second life. Here’s our overview of cryonics, cryosleep, and cryotherapy. Relax, David, open your eyes! That’s the last line from Vanilla Sky, the movie remake about a wealthy playboy in cryosleep waking up after 150 years from his lucid dream (starring Tom Cruise as David). The audience doesn’t know wha...
Source: The Medical Futurist - October 17, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Bioethics Cyborgization Medical Science Fiction Patients Researchers Space Medicine cryogenics cryonics cryosleep cryotherapy death future Innovation life longevity mars NASA scifi space travel Source Type: blogs

HOW TO Avoid Jet Lag With Technologies For Short Travels?
The zombi-state of jet lag is a notorious condition for the community of travelers jumping from one time zone to another. As I constantly travel long distances for short periods of time, I worked out a method which keeps my overall inner clock intact. Let’s dive into how you can avoid jet lag with the help of technologies! Jet lag – The hidden cost of traveling You feel like your brain is covered with fog, deep fatigue rains over your body, sometimes aligned with nausea and constipation. No matter what you do, you wake up at 3 am at night and feel totally worn down the next day. For three to five days in a row...
Source: The Medical Futurist - May 31, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: From Chance to Choice Health Sensors & Trackers digital digital health digital technology Innovation jetlag personalized personalized health wearables Source Type: blogs

Cryotherapy: Can it stop your pain cold?
Follow me on Twitter @RobShmerling Let’s say you’ve started working out at the gym and you’re wondering what you can do for your aching muscles. How does this sound? Put on a pair of gloves, shoes, socks, and a protective headband to cover your ears and face — but wear little else. Then step into a cold room for three to four minutes. By “cold” I mean really cold: between −100° C and −140° C (which is −148° F to −220° F)! If that sounds good to you (really?), you may already be using whole body cryotherapy (WBC). And if it sounds terrible to you (o...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - April 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Complementary and alternative medicine Health Source Type: blogs

Channel Medsystems ’ Cerene Cryotherapy Device for Menstrual Bleeding Cleared in Europe
Channel Medsystems, a company based in San Francisco, California, won the European CE Mark to introduce its Cerene cryotherapy device in the European market. The endometrial ablation device is designed to help address heavy menstrual bleeding in premenopausal women who are done having children. Unlike other existing endometrial ablation devices, when using the Cerene the patient may not need any sedation or anesthesia, as there may not be much discomfort during a procedure that takes less than three minutes. Once the tip of the device reaches the fundus, nitrous oxide is released into an inflatable pouch that expands ...
Source: Medgadget - June 29, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Ob/Gyn Source Type: blogs

Physical Fitness and Sports Month: Commonly Asked Questions About Sports Injuries with Dr. Packer
Dr. Jonathan Packer is an orthopaedic surgeon with the University of Maryland Department of Orthopaedics and an Assistant Professor of Orthopaedics at the University of Maryland School of Medicine.  Dr. Packer specializes in sports medicine and is a Team Physician with the University of Maryland Terrapins.  Below he answers common questions about sports injuries. What are the most common sports-related injuries you see in your clinic? The most common sports related injuries are ankle sprains and contusions.  The most common knee injuries that I see are meniscus tears and knee ligament injuries, such as the M...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - May 16, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: UMMC Tags: Doctors Employees & Staff Health Tips Orthopaedics Source Type: blogs

The 7 Morning Rituals That Changed My Life
You're reading The 7 Morning Rituals That Changed My Life, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. I’ve always wondered how successful entrepreneurs always stay energetic and motivated throughout their day. While it seemed that they were just highly driven people, there seemed to be no way I could achieve such a level of motivation. And then, I came across an interview with Tony Robbins on YouTube where he talked about his daily morning priming routine. I was blown away. It wasn’t Tony’s meth...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - March 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: catalinzorzini Tags: featured happiness self improvement best morning routine focus meditation morning rituals pickthebrain success Source Type: blogs

MKSAP: 53-year-old woman with a skin lesion
Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 53-year-old woman is evaluated for a slowly enlarging, telangiectatic, pearly, ulcerated 1-cm plaque on the left temple. It bleeds periodically when traumatized. Medical history is significant for atrial fibrillation. She takes warfarin daily. She is otherwise in good health. On physical examination, vital signs are normal. Cardiac examination shows an irregular heart rate but is otherwise normal. The remainder of the examination is unremarkable. Biopsy of the lesion reveals a basal cell carcinoma with...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 5, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Dermatology Source Type: blogs

Cervical Cancer Screening with Vinegar in Less Developed Countries
In an earlier note about two years ago, I discussed how vinegar applied to the uterine cervix could be used as a simple test in developing countries to detect dysplasia (see: Replacing the Pathologist and Gynecologist with Vinegar and CO2). Here's a quote from that note: Nurses using the new procedure, developed by experts at the Johns Hopkins medical school in the 1990s and endorsed last year by the World Health Organization, brush vinegar on a woman’s cervix. It makes precancerous spots turn white. They can then be immediately frozen off with a metal probe cooled by a tank of carbon dioxide, available from...
Source: Lab Soft News - June 20, 2013 Category: Pathologists Authors: Bruce Friedman Tags: Healthcare Delivery Medical Consumerism Medical Education Medical Research Public Health Informatics Surgical Pathology Source Type: blogs