Coping With IBS
Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) can be painful, annoying, and embarrassing. There is currently no cure for this complex condition, and managing its symptoms and flare-ups is tricky. So, coping mechanisms are a constant need. What are the symptoms of IBS? IBS is a gastrointestinal disorder in which your gut becomes more sensitive, and the muscles of your digestive system have abnormal contractions. People with IBS usually have abdominal pain along with frequent changes in bowel habits (diarrhea, constipation, or alternating between both). Other common symptoms include bloating and gas urge to move the bowels, but being unab...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - November 3, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Matthew Solan Tags: Digestive Disorders Health Mental Health Stress Source Type: blogs

Constipation Among Issues That Can Cause Fecal Incontinence
Many conditions can carry as a side effect some degree of fecal incontinence, so if you are affected, or someone you care for is struggling with the issue, having a better understanding of the potential causes could help ease the way toward treatment or acceptance. First, of course, realize that for any type of incontinence, working closely with your doctor is important since many types can be lessened or even corrected with proper medical care. Continue reading on Egosancares blog for more insight into the causes and treatment and/or management of fecal incontinence: Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share...
Source: Minding Our Elders - October 29, 2020 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Ending Constipation from Suboxone and Buprenorphine
Constipation is one of the few potential side effects caused by buprenorphine medications, including Suboxone Film and Zubsolv. Fortunately, ‘binding up’ can be managed by making minor changes to your lifestyle. Constipation from buprenorphine is caused by activation of mu opioid receptors in the small and large intestine, reducing the sequential squeezing and relaxation (called peristalsis) that pushes bowel contents forward. All opioids have similar effects, mimicking our natural endorphins throughout the body. Endorphins are released during trauma to naturally block pain and to divert blood flow to areas ...
Source: Suboxone Talk Zone - October 28, 2020 Category: Addiction Authors: admin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

IBS-C, methanogenic SIBO, and L. reuteri
The post IBS-C, methanogenic SIBO, and L. reuteri appeared first on Dr. William Davis. (Source: Wheat Belly Blog)
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - August 25, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle bowel flora constipation IBS ibs-c methanogen methanogenic microbiota probiotic sibo undoctored Source Type: blogs

Caregiving and the Ever-Present Guilt: Enough Already!
  Photo credit Edward Cisneros ...You're visiting Mom in her apartment and you've been there long enough to do laundry and clean up the bathroom and kitchen. You visit a bit. She is watching her favorite show on TV, which you hate, but she wants your company. You've got kids coming home, but not for a while. Would a little white lie be okay? I mean, as part of the sandwich generation, is it awful to want to have a half-hour between Mom and kids; a half-hour for yourself to regain some sense of tranquility? Continue reading on Agingcare for more insight into why caregivers feel so guilty so often: Purchase Minding Our ...
Source: Minding Our Elders - August 23, 2020 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Fecal Incontinence Can Be a Side Effect of Various Conditions Including Constipation
Many conditions can carry as a side effect some degree of fecal incontinence, so if you are affected, or someone you care for is struggling with the issue, having a better understanding of the potential causes could help ease the way toward acceptance. Fortunately, fecal incontinence is not nearly as common as urinary incontinence. In fact, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) says that in a study involving older adults, 25 percent had moderate, severe, or very severe urinary leakage but only about eight percent had moderate, severe, or very severe bowel leakage. Still, that is not an insignificant number so the caus...
Source: Minding Our Elders - August 19, 2020 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

The lowdown on the low-FODMAP diet
Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common intestinal disorder that produces distressing symptoms like abdominal pain, significant bloating, and altered bowel movements that can shuttle between diarrhea and constipation. While changing what you eat won’t cure you, an evidence-based approach called the low-FODMAP diet is the most frequently prescribed food plan to help relieve IBS symptoms. Studies show it can reduce symptoms for the majority of patients. However, because of certain challenges and risks associated with the low-FODMAP diet, it’s worth talking to an expert before you try it. FODMAP basics  Th...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - July 27, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Emily Gelsomin, MLA, RD, LDN Tags: Digestive Disorders Healthy Eating Source Type: blogs

A case of misinterpreted troponins, in spite of a very suspicious ECG....
This 50-something male with previous history of MI presented for intermittent CP and SOB for 2 days. CP lasted for hours at a time, was described as pleuritic, without radiation, but relieved by nitro. He was given nitro and full dose aspirin by EMS.  Prehospital ECG was similar to first ED ECG.Here is the ED ECG for ED visit #1:It is very abnormal, with potentially ischemic downsloping ST depressionThere were 3 ECGs during an ED visit for chest pain one month earlier.  Let's call that ED visit zero.Here is the last EKG from ED visit zero:There is minimal ST depression without the downsloping.Here ...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - July 20, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

Gastrointestinal Diseases in America: The Costly Impact on Employers and Patients
SPONSORED POST By SAM HOLLIDAY Medically reviewed by Jenny Blair, MD Gastrointestinal diseases like inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are more prevalent—and costlier—than many employers realize. Up to 70 million Americans are affected by gastrointestinal (GI) diseases each year—twice as many people as those living with diabetes (34.2 million).[1],[2] Overall direct healthcare costs for GI diseases are estimated to be $136 billion each year in the U.S., more than heart disease ($113bn) and mental health disorders ($99bn...
Source: The Health Care Blog - June 25, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Health Tech gastrointestinal diseases Oshi Health Sam Holliday Source Type: blogs

Probiotics — even inactive ones — may relieve IBS symptoms
Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic gut-brain disorder that can cause a variety of uncomfortable gastrointestinal symptoms including abdominal pain and diarrhea, constipation, or a mix of the two. IBS can reduce quality of life, often results in missed school or work, and can have a substantial economic impact. Physicians diagnose IBS by identifying symptoms laid out in the Rome Criteria, a set of diagnostic measures developed by a group of more than 100 international experts. Limited diagnostic testing is also done, to help exclude other conditions that could present with similar symptoms. Although the precise cau...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - June 22, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Anthony Lembo, MD Tags: Digestive Disorders Health Probiotics Source Type: blogs

The Three M ’ s of Constipation
The post The Three M’s of Constipation appeared first on Dr. William Davis. (Source: Wheat Belly Blog)
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - June 17, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates Source Type: blogs

Can celiac disease affect life expectancy?
Celiac disease (CD), triggered by the ingestion of gluten, occurs in people genetically predisposed to develop the chronic autoimmune condition. During the past few decades, doctors have learned much about how the disease develops, including genetic and other risk factors. However, results from studies on whether people with CD have an increased risk of premature death linked to the condition have been mixed. A recent study shows a small but statistically significant increased mortality rate. Celiac disease can affect the entire body Until recently, CD was considered a mainly pediatric gastrointestinal disorder, associated...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - May 28, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Maureen Leonard, MD, MMSc Tags: Allergies Autoimmune diseases Source Type: blogs

The hard facts behind constipation
The post The hard facts behind constipation appeared first on Dr. William Davis. (Source: Wheat Belly Blog)
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - April 18, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle bowel flora microbiota prebiotic probiotic undoctored Source Type: blogs

Senna: The True Ex-Lax
Constipation is one of those not-so-exciting subjects that affects both children and adults from time to time, but because it is so common, it warrants a closer look. Bowel movements tend to occur about once a day after children have reached the age where their diet is largely comprised of solid food. Starchy foods, such as bananas, rice, grains, and flour, tend to make stools firmer. Foods high in fiber like peaches, plums, and apricots have more of a softening effect. In a diet rich in fruits and vegetables, a balance is struck between different foods to create stools that are soft enough to pass comfortably without bein...
Source: Conversations with Dr Greene - March 15, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Alan Greene MD Tags: Dr. Greene's Blog Constipation Herbal Source Type: blogs

Opioid Abuse: How and When to Get Help
Opioids are so highly addictive that they have created a dangerous and deadly epidemic in the United States. In fact, the National Institute on Drug Abuse reports that more than 2 million Americans abuse opioids and that more than 90 Americans die on average by opioid overdose every day. Individuals can become addicted to opioids so quickly that it can be difficult to notice when the line has been crossed over to opioid abuse. If you or your loved one is taking opioids, whether legal or illegal, make note of these signs and symptoms of opioid abuse and how to get help. How Does Opioid Abuse Begin? Opioids work by binding ...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - December 17, 2019 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Addiction Recovery Addiction to Pharmaceuticals Detox Resources for Alcohol and Drugs/Opiates abuse heroin heroin addiction heroin users opiate abuse opioid opioid crisis opioids prescription drug abuse prescription drug addiction Source Type: blogs

Paediatric Constipation
Dr Oliver Flower Paediatric Constipation Paediatric constipation is a common problem and the biggest problem clinicians make is not taking a thorough bowel history. (Source: Life in the Fast Lane)
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - December 14, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Dr Oliver Flower Tags: Clinical Crit Care Pediatrics SMACC19 Bowel history Constipation Harald Hirschsprung Hirschsprung disease Paediatric constipation Ross Fisher Source Type: blogs

Signs of Opioid Use
What are the Signs of Opioid Use? Opioids are a group of drugs derived naturally from the poppy plant, or are man-made in a laboratory, also known as synthetic opioids. Opioids are generally prescribed to individuals suffering from chronic pain, whether from surgery, a major injury or other health issues. Legally prescribed opioids include morphine, codeine, and oxycodone, while illegal opioids include heroin. It is easy to know if an individual is using opioids if they’ve been prescribed, but it is also important to know the signs of opioid use if it has crossed the line into an addiction. Signs and Symptoms There a...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - December 11, 2019 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Addiction Addiction to Pharmaceuticals Painkiller opioid opioids prescription drug abuse prescription drug addiction prescription drug detox prescription drugs prescription medication signs of addiction Source Type: blogs

The Vitamin That Reduces Stomach Bloating
The vitamin helps easy many symptoms of IBS, which include abdominal pain, diarrhea, constipation and bloating. → Support PsyBlog for just $4 per month. Enables access to articles marked (M) and removes ads. → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Accept Yourself: How to feel a profound sense of warmth and self-compassion The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do (Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog)
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - November 28, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jeremy Dean Tags: Nutrition Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, November 25th 2019
This study demonstrates for the first time that senescent cells secrete functional LTs, significantly contributing to the LTs pool known to cause or exacerbate idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Against Senolytics https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/11/against-senolytics/ There is no consensus in science that is so strong as to have no heretics. So here we have an interview with a naysayer on the matter of senolytic treatments, who argues that the loss of senescent cells in aged tissues will cause more harm to long-term health than the damage they will do by remaining. To be clear, I think this to be a ...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 24, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Targeting α-Synuclein in the Gut to Turn Back the Progression of Parkinson's Disease
Like most neurodegenerative conditions, Parkinson's disease is driven in large part by the pathological aggregation of misfolded proteins, in this case α-synuclein. These solid deposits of protein spread from cell to cell, and are accompanied by a surrounding halo of harmful biochemical interactions. There is evidence for the protein aggregation of Parkinson's disease to start in the gut and then spread to the brain. You might look at a recent paper that discusses whether or not we should consider Parkinson's to be two diseases with a similar outcome, one in which the α-synuclein aggregation originates in the g...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 20, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Stopping the vicious cycle of rebound headaches
Rebound headaches, also known as medication overuse headaches, are caused by the frequent or excessive use of pain-relieving and/or antimigraine drugs to treat headache attacks that are already in progress. (Note that these are not the same as oral prophylactic or preventive medicines, which should be taken daily.) In other words, the same medications that initially relieve headache pain can themselves trigger subsequent headaches if they are used too often. Medication overuse headaches can be disabling, forcing people with this condition to take sick leave and to be less productive at work and home. To be diagnosed with m...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - November 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sait Ashina, MD Tags: Drugs and Supplements Headache Health Source Type: blogs

In defense of the salt shaker
Sherry B, a healthy and active 61-year-old woman, came to my office several months ago. She had noted an unusually fast heart rate during exercise, and felt lightheaded when standing in line at the grocery store or after finishing her five-mile run. She carried a water bottle with her and drank from it throughout our meeting. “I don’t understand!” she said, “I’m always thirsty, even though I drink water constantly.” Most of her symptoms had started the previous year when she decided to “clean up” her lifestyle, began to exercise more regularly, and stopped eating out. She add...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - November 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Dara K. Lee Lewis, MD Tags: Healthy Eating Heart Health Hypertension and Stroke Source Type: blogs

Harvard Health Ad Watch: What you should know about direct-to-consumer ads
If you’re like most people, you’ve seen a ton of direct-to-consumer (DTC) drug ads in recent years. They’re all over television, in magazines, online, on billboards, and slapped on the sides of buses, promoting treatments for arthritis, cancer, heartburn, psoriasis, flagging memory — and more. The deluge of drug ads can be overwhelming. Worse, the information is often incomplete, biased, or confusing. That’s why we’re launching the Harvard Health Ad Watch series to highlight some benefits and problems with health product advertisements. We’ll focus on the evidence behind the ads an...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - September 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Children's Health Drugs and Supplements Men's Health Women's Health Source Type: blogs

Prepubertal Dysuria Not as Simple as a UTI
​Prepubertal boys who present to the emergency department with dysuria are uncommon. The adult with burning on urination is assumed to have a sexually transmitted disease, but of course that diagnosis should not be high on your list for boys.In fact, infectious urethritis in children is quite uncommon unless there is premature sexual activity or sexual abuse by an adult. Unfortunately, a variety of noninfectious urethral pathologies may mimic infectious urethritis in children. A urinary tract infection in a prepubertal boy is an infectious cause of dysuria. Those infections, however, rarely present with the isolated symp...
Source: M2E Too! Mellick's Multimedia EduBlog - September 3, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

The Best Way To Reduce Stomach Bloating
How to reduce heartburn, stomach pain, diarrhoea, constipation and bloating. → Support PsyBlog for just $4 per month. Enables access to articles marked (M) and removes ads. → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Accept Yourself: How to feel a profound sense of warmth and self-compassion The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do (Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog)
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - August 30, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Mina Dean Tags: Stomach bloating Source Type: blogs

Is there a role for surgery in treating Hashimoto ’s thyroiditis?
This study raises the possibility of a role for surgery for patients with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis who continue to feel poorly despite optimal treatment with thyroid hormone. However, the study, while well done, is a relatively small one. We need longer-term follow up and confirmation with additional studies done on diverse populations. It’s also important to consider that thyroid surgery in patients with advanced Hashimoto’s thyroiditis is difficult. Rates of complications, including injury to the laryngeal nerve (which controls voice) and the parathyroid glands (which maintain normal blood calcium levels...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - August 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Garber, MD, FACP, FACE Tags: Health Thyroid Disorders Source Type: blogs

Constipation Nation: Updated
The post Constipation Nation: Updated appeared first on Dr. William Davis. (Source: Wheat Belly Blog)
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - August 4, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Constipation bowel flora gluten-free grain-free grains wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Need to check your thyroid? Maybe not
As medical science advances, we have more tests and biomarkers available to help identify illnesses. Yet overdiagnosis and overtreatment that may occur following abnormal results can cause dangerous adverse effects and costly consequences. Hypothyroidism — a lower than normal range of thyroid hormones — may be the poster child for this problem because it is such a common condition. What is hypothyroidism? At the front of your neck lies the thyroid, a butterfly-shaped gland that makes the hormone T4. When released into the bloodstream, T4 converts to T3, the most active form of thyroid hormone. Having sufficient...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - July 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Marcelo Campos, MD Tags: Autoimmune diseases Fatigue Tests and procedures Thyroid Disorders Source Type: blogs

Why Do I Have to Keep Using More to Get High?
When using drugs or alcohol, you may start to find that you need to keep using more to get high than you did when you first started. When a couple of glasses of wine used to get you plenty drunk, you’re finding that you need a full bottle or even more. This is called building tolerance and can cause some damaging effects to the body, including leading to addiction and death. Using More to Get High: Building Tolerance According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, tolerance occurs when the person no longer responds to the drug in the way that person initially responded. Stated another way, it takes a higher dose ...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - July 17, 2019 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Addiction Addiction Recovery Alcohol Alcoholism Drug Treatment Substance Abuse alcohol addiction alcohol dependence alcohol dependency alcohol detox alcohol disorder drug addiction drug addiction recovery drug addiction treatment Source Type: blogs

Into The Future of Gastroenterology With Digestibles And Microbiome Testing
Gluten? Lactose? Stomach pain? Digestive troubles? Way too many people suffer from gastrointestinal issues, and much less are aware of the digital technologies that can come to their aid. Did you know that digestibles could successfully replace the dreaded colonoscopy? Or have you heard about microbiome testing? What about the swarm of health apps supporting dietary restrictions? We took a deep breath and jumped into the universe of digital technologies just to bring you as much information about the future of gastroenterology as possible. Will you jump after us? IBS, colorectal cancer, and other animals Referring to...
Source: The Medical Futurist - July 4, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine Genomics Health Sensors & Trackers diet dieting digestibles digestion digital health gastro gastroenterologist gastroenterology gastrointestinal gluten gut Innovation lactose microbiome stomach techno Source Type: blogs

Are CBP ’s Filthy and Inhumane Immigrant Detention Camps Necessary?
This report came just over a month afterDHS OIG ’s May 30 report on “dangerous overcrowding” in El Paso.What are the conditions in CBP ’s detention camps?Across the entire border, CBPwas detaining from May to June between 4 and 5 times as many people as its facilities were designed to hold. It is impossible to list here everything that the OIG reports exposed, but here are some of what they found:A cell with a maximum capacity of 35 held 155 detaineesA cell with a maximum capacity of 8 held 41 detaineesDetainees were wearing soiled clothing for days or weeks.Children at three of the five Border Patr...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - July 3, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: David Bier Source Type: blogs

Eat, Pray, Push
Here’s an excerpt from chapter 4 of Wheat Belly Total Health, Your Bowels Have Been Fouled: Intestinal Indignities From Grains: “A condition as pedestrian as constipation serves to perfectly illustrate many of the ways in which grains mess with normal body functions, as well as just how wrong conventional ‘solutions’ can be. Constipation remedies are like the Keystone Kops of health, stumbling, fumbling, and bumping into each other, but never quite putting out the fire. “Drop a rock from the top of a building and it predictably hits the ground—not sometimes, not half the time, but every ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - June 25, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates Gliadin gluten grain-free wheat belly Wheat Belly Total Health Source Type: blogs

Should you Graze?
You're reading Should you Graze?, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. Grazed and confusedGrazing is picking at food little by little so that you're continually eating as opposed to eating only at mealtimes. Have you grazed and been confused for so long it's not true? Alright, I admit it, it may be punny but it's not very funny. The point I'm trying to make is that grazing on food can be confusing and here's why. 50 shades of graze When you graze, there are many questions you can ask yourself. For instance...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - June 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: jgrabon Tags: featured health and fitness self improvement grazing health trends pickthebrain Source Type: blogs

Is an opioid really the best medication for my pain?
As physicians, many of our daily practices involve administration of substances that are shrouded in mystery. Certain medications, specifically opioids, have been part of tragic news stories, and have turned young children into orphans, happy spouses into widows and widowers, and once-aspirational youth into memories. The CDC reports that on average, 130 people die each day from an opioid overdose. With such harrowing statistics, why take opioids in the first place? Well, if used appropriately, opioids can significantly improve pain with relatively tolerable side effects. A short-term course of opioids (typically 3 to 7 da...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - June 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Salim Zerriny, MD Tags: Addiction Pain Management Source Type: blogs

5 Surprising Things Stress Can Do to Your Body
You're reading 5 Surprising Things Stress Can Do to Your Body, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. You just got off a terrible meeting, your boss gave you an impossible deadline for the next project, your team is pushing you to make extra hours, and you still need to pick up the kids at school. Your body is in a “fight or flight response.” Your stress levels are high, you feel your breath get quicker and even feel your heart beating faster than usual. Although this is all a natural response from y...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - June 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: annabelle Tags: featured health and fitness self improvement stress Source Type: blogs

MKSAP: 35-year-old woman with constipation
Test your medicine knowledge with the  MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 35-year-old woman is evaluated for constipation. She reports passage of hard stool every 3 to 4 days and associated bloating. Her symptoms have been present for more than 10 years and have progressed gradually. Trials of o ver-the-counter fiber supplementation and […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 8, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/mksap" rel="tag" > mksap < /a > < /span > Tags: Meds Gastroenterology Medications Source Type: blogs

Magnum, P.I.
​An 11-year-old boy with cerebral palsy presented to the emergency department unresponsive. His mother said the child was in his normal state earlier that morning, but was blue and unresponsive when she tried to wake him from his morning nap. A home pulse oximeter reported an oxygen level of 55%.The mother placed the child on oxygen and called 911. He was still unresponsive on arrival, and his physical examination demonstrated flaccid paralysis and a GCS score of 3 with fixed dilated pupils. He was tachycardic with shallow respirations. His initial vital signs were a temperature of 36.9°C, a heart rate of 136 bpm, a ...
Source: The Tox Cave - June 1, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

When constipation pain was worse than cancer pain
Coming in to meet the students, house staff, and patients for the first day on service always excites me. This Monday was no exception. What awaited me? How many patients would I need to see? What lessons could I impart? When I arrived, we had 11 patients, two new, and nine had arrived previously. Going […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 30, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/robert-centor" rel="tag" > Robert Centor, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Conditions Gastroenterology Oncology/Hematology Source Type: blogs

“ What if I just ignore my SIBO? ”
By just engaging in the basic strategies in the Wheat Belly Total Health, Wheat Belly 10-Day Grain Detox, or Undoctored programs, many mild cases of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, SIBO, reverse. These efforts thereby restore your ability to ingest prebiotic fibers without diarrhea, bloating, gas, abdominal discomfort, joint pain, and dark emotional feelings. Many people thereby are relieved of irritable bowel syndrome symptoms, fibromyalgia, or restless leg syndrome, or have greater power in reversing autoimmune conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis. Unfortunately, not everybody enjoys reversal of SIBO with our b...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - May 27, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: SIBO grain-free probiotic undoctored wheat belly Source Type: blogs

MKSAP: 60-year-old woman with persistent constipation
Test your medicine knowledge with the  MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 60-year-old woman is evaluated for persistent constipation symptoms of 2 years’ duration. She has reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome involving the right arm and neck that began 3 years earlier and requires chronic opioid analgesic therapy. She reports passing two hard […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 25, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/mksap" rel="tag" > mksap < /a > < /span > Tags: Meds Gastroenterology Source Type: blogs

Treating constipation with biofeedback for the pelvic floor
Constipation is often clinically defined as having three or fewer bowel movements a week. Sometimes this is about expectations; people generally feel like they’re not “healthy” if they don’t have a bowel movement every day. But three bowel movements a week can be normal for some people, especially if that has been their pattern for a long time. There are many other factors that affect how people perceive bowel movements. According to the Rome IV criteria of constipation often used in research, frequency alone doesn’t explain all complaints of constipation. Patients complaining of two or more o...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - May 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Judy Nee, MD Tags: Complementary and alternative medicine Digestive Disorders Health Source Type: blogs

Swallowable Vibrating Pill Shakes Faecis to Relieve Constipation
Constipation is often a hard problem to solve, typically requiring medications to get things moving down there. Medications have side effects, nor do they always work as is hoped for. We, being fans of medical gadgetry, are glad to see that a drug-free pill has been developed capable of shacking up the large intestine and motivating the flow of excrement. The Vibrant capsule, from an Israeli company of the same name, is swallowed like a typical pill. Before going in, it is programmed in a particular “mode” that regulates how and when the device will vibrate after ingestion. Once its job is done, the pill leaves...
Source: Medgadget - April 4, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: GI Medicine Source Type: blogs

Fentanyl, How Bad Is It?
How Bad Is Fentanyl? Fentanyl is an extremely dangerous synthetic opioid. Unlike some other opioids that occur naturally, it is man-made for the purpose of helping aid people suffering from extreme pain. It can be administered for recovery after surgery, during cancer treatments or for recovery after a painful injury. The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) classifies fentanyl as a Schedule II controlled substance. This means that it is legal for medical use, however, it has an extremely high potential for abuse and addiction. Understanding Fentanyl Significantly stronger than morphine or oxycodone, Fentanyl can be fatal...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - April 2, 2019 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Addiction Addiction to Pharmaceuticals Drug Rehab Information Drug Treatment Heroin Painkiller Substance Abuse Synthetic fentanyl prescription drug abuse prescription drug addiction prescription drug detox prescription drug use p Source Type: blogs

Is the ketogenic diet dangerous?
  Answer: No—unless you do it for more than a few months. After a few months, the upfront metabolic and weight benefits will begin to reverse and new health problems arise. We know this with confidence. I raise this question once again because more and more people are coming to me reporting problems. It may take months, even years, but the long-term consequences can be quite serious. Achieving ketosis by engaging in a very low-carbohydrate, high-fat lifestyle is—without a doubt—an effective means of losing weight, breaking insulin and leptin resistance, reversing type 2 diabetes and fatty liver, redu...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - March 12, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: ketones bowel flora ketogenic ketotic undoctored wheat belly Source Type: blogs

8 Health Risks of Untreated Depression
Medication side-effects can seem unbearable at times: dry mouth, nausea, dizziness, constipation. Certain prescriptions can also increase our risks for developing chronic conditions like thyroid disease and diabetes. Three years ago, I decided that the pills’ side-effects weren’t worth the relief they brought, so I slowly weaned off all my medication. I then plummeted into a severe depression that ended up taking a far greater toll on my health than the nuisance of my drugs. You may be justifiably concerned about how your mood stabilizer and antidepressant are altering your biochemistry, but also consider the g...
Source: World of Psychology - March 5, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Therese J. Borchard Tags: Depression General Medications Antidepressant Cognitive Decline Diabetes Mood Stabilizer Source Type: blogs

What to do if your child is constipated
Constipation is a very common problem in children. Whether it’s something temporary after an illness or diet change, or something more chronic, up to 20% of children suffer from it at one time or another. As much as it makes people uncomfortable to talk about poop, having trouble pooping is even more uncomfortable. Luckily, it is generally a very treatable problem. Symptoms of constipation Constipation plays out differently in different people. It can be any, or any combination, of stooling less than three times a week having stools that are hard and difficult to pass having stools that are very large (large enough ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - March 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Claire McCarthy, MD Tags: Children's Health Digestive Disorders Parenting Source Type: blogs

Five big nutritional mistakes I ’ ve made over the years
No question: I have made some huge nutritional blunders over the past 25 years since I began to become seriously involved in nutritional issues. My mistakes, however, have provided powerful feedback on how to get diet right, how to get diet wrong. The impact of diet is profound. Among the huge mistakes I’ve made: 1) Reducing total and saturated fat, eating vegetarian—It made me hungry, never satisfied, and, along with mistake #2, made me a type 2 diabetic with fasting blood sugars of 160+ mg/dl, triglycerides as high as 390 mg/dl, a HDL of 27 mg/dl, oodles of small LDL particles, and high blood pressure. 2) Eat...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - March 2, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates exercise grain-free grains undoctored vitamin D Weight Loss wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Interoperability and Data Blocking | Part 1: Fostering Innovation
By DAVE LEVIN MD  The Office of the National Coordinator (ONC) and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) have published proposed final rules on interoperability and data blocking as part of implementing the 21st Century Cures act. In this series we will explore the ideas behind the rules, why they are necessary and the expected impact. Given that these are complex, controversial topics, and open to interpretation, we invite readers to respond with their own ideas, corrections, and opinions. _____________ Health IT 1.0, the basic digitalization of health care, succeeded in getting health care to stop using pens ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - February 27, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: matthew holt Tags: Health Policy Health Technology The Business of Health Care CMS Dave Levin Health Data Health IT Interoperability ONC Sansoro Health Source Type: blogs

The man in 558
Coming in to meet the students, housestaff and patients for the first day on service always excites me. This Monday was no exception. What awaited me? How many patients would I need to see? What lessons could I impart? When I arrived we had 11 patients, 2 new and 9 had arrived previously. Going through the list, while routine, always stimulated questions and teaching opportunities. Sometimes the team had questions for me. Sometimes they had a mischievous sense of putting me on the spot. I always love that interplay. When we got to the man in 558, they told a sad story of an angry man with terminal cancer. He had acce...
Source: DB's Medical Rants - February 25, 2019 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: rcentor Tags: Medical Rants Source Type: blogs

Should I be eating more fiber?
You probably know the basics about fiber: it’s the part of plant foods that your body cannot digest, and there are two types — soluble fiber and insoluble fiber. Both types of fiber are good for us. Soluble fiber dissolves in water, forming a gel. It is the form of fiber that helps lower cholesterol levels, reduce the risk of heart disease, and regulate blood sugar levels. Soluble fiber is found in black beans, lima beans, Brussels sprouts, avocado, sweet potato, broccoli, turnips, and pears. Insoluble fiber passes through the digestive system relatively intact, adding bulk to stools. It is the form of fiber th...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - February 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Katherine D. McManus, MS, RD, LDN Tags: Diet and Weight Loss Health Healthy Eating Source Type: blogs