CBT 'should be routinely offered' to women with premenstrual syndrome
Gynaecologists advise that cognitive behavioural therapy could help women manage the symptoms of PMSWomen experiencing premenstrual syndrome should routinely be offered cognitive behavioural therapy to help them manage the symptoms, gynaecologists have said.Around 40% of women experience symptoms of PMS with around5%-8% having severe symptoms. Physical symptoms can include swollen breasts and bloating, and the psychological symptoms are wide-ranging, including depression, irritability, suicidal thoughts and loss of confidence. The condition can be debilitating, disrupting school, social and work life.Continue reading... (S...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 30, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Mental health & wellbeing Women Menstruation Society Psychiatry Contraception and family planning Depression Life and style Psychology Science UK news Source Type: news

One-on-One Cognitive Therapy Bests Group Approach in PTSD One-on-One Cognitive Therapy Bests Group Approach in PTSD
Individual cognitive processing therapy works better and faster than group therapy in active-duty military personnel with PTSD, new research shows.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - November 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Psychiatry News Source Type: news

Active-duty military find PTSD relief through individual cognitive therapy
Although both group and individual therapy can ease post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in active-duty military service members, individual therapy relieved PTSD symptoms better and quicker, according to a study. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - November 23, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Active-duty military find PTSD relief through individual cognitive therapy
(Duke University Medical Center) Although both group and individual therapy can ease post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in active-duty military service members, individual therapy relieved PTSD symptoms better and quicker, according to a study led by a Duke University School of Medicine researcher. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 23, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Can a high-tech treatment help combat some of our oldest fears?
Conclusion This experimental study assessed whether it is possible to counter-condition people against their fear memories by using reward without actually having to re-expose the person to the fearful stimulus. The researchers conclude that they have shown this can be done, all with participants remaining unaware of the content and purpose of the procedure. They further suggest the procedure may be an initial step towards novel treatments for fear-related disorders such as phobia and PTSD, via unconscious processing. While these findings show promise, there are some key limitations, the main one being the small number of ...
Source: NHS News Feed - November 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Mental health Neurology Source Type: news

It is unclear if combined motivational interviewing and cognitive behavioural therapy improve medication adherence
Medication adherence is a complex problem affecting the care of patients with various medical and psychiatric conditions. The study by Spoelstra et al attempts to review the evidence of combined motivational interviewing (MI) and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) interventions to promote medication adherence. Combined MI and CBT may improve medication adherence … (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - November 21, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Hidden in plain sight: The unmet mental health needs of older people
The Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) programme, launched in 2008, aimed to increase the number of people accessing talking therapies such as Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) for common conditions like anxiety and depression. In 2011 the Department of Health set a target of 12% of referrals through the IAPT programme being people aged 65 and over. Five years later it is still not close to being met with national reporting showing it is currently at 6.1%. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - November 21, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Simpler, cheaper therapy (behavioural activation) can be as good as CBT for treating depression
A simpler therapy called behavioural activation can be as effective at treating adults with depression as cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT). Also, it is delivered more cheaply, by trained junior mental health workers. CBT is commonly provided to adults with depression and it is recommended by NICE as first- line treatment. However, it is complex to deliver and therapists are highly skilled and expensive. Behavioural activation is a simpler type of talking therapy that encourages people to develop more positive behaviour such as planning activities and doing constructive things that they would usually avoid doing. We did ...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - November 21, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why Do We Worry?
Conclusion Worry is a normal phenomenon that affects us all. Worry can be adaptive in situations where there is a real possibility of injury or death, but in the majority of instances, is not a successful strategy to deal with the vicissitudes of life.  Research shows that when worry becomes severe and excessive, individuals are at risk of developing generalized anxiety disorder; a condition involving chronic worry, muscles tension, and irritability. Individuals with this disorder may worry for a variety of reasons, such as to avoid mental imagery of disastrous outcomes, to tolerate ambiguity and uncertainty, to avoid...
Source: Psych Central - November 19, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Ben Taylor Tags: Anxiety Neuroscience Stress chronic worry Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Generalized Anxiety Disorder Panic Disorder Psychology Rumination Social Anxiety Disorder Source Type: news

Preventive Therapy for OCD?
The postpartum period is sometimes accompanied by anxiety, depression, and even obsessive-compulsive disorder. Studies on preventive therapy for postpartum OCD have shown promising results. What a great idea! Stop OCD in its tracks before it has a chance to latch on to people and wreak havoc in their lives. But why limit this preventive therapy to women who have just given birth? We know that obsessive-compulsive disorder sometimes runs in families. We know that there are often subtle signs of OCD before it becomes full-blown. We know that OCD involves anxiety and is often seen with co-ex...
Source: Psych Central - November 18, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Janet Singer Tags: Antidepressants Caregivers Children and Teens Cognitive-Behavioral Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Psychology Anxiety Cognitive Behavior Therapy Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Source Type: news

New guide 'helps 60% of youngsters overcome their fear'
Led by academics at Sheffield University, the guide uses cognitive behavioural therapy techniques to reduce children's anxiety about going to the dentist. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 2, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Can't Sleep? Now There's A Coach For That.
First came diet coaches, exercise coaches, career coaches and spiritual and life coaches. There should be no surprise that as the population ages and increasingly has trouble staying asleep that the next step would be sleep coaches. Insomnia is the most common sleep problem for adults, and has been linked to depression, falls, stroke and memory problems. Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia, or CBTI, is considered a highly effective method for treating the disorder, but many do not receive it due to a lack of therapists with CBTI training, according to a paper published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Socie...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Science News ยป RDoC Unit to Co-host Webinar Series
The NIMH Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) unit, the Delaware Project (DP), and the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT) will launch a webinar series examining the science-to-service pipeline in psychology and psychiatry. (Source: National Institute of Mental Health)
Source: National Institute of Mental Health - November 1, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Authors: NIMH Press Office Source Type: news

Treating Insomnia Benefits Work Outcomes
Insomnia is running rampant through contemporary society. Large scale studies estimate the prevalence of insomnia of around 25%-30% of adults in the United States and Canada. This is a big health problem, but it is also a work problem. Accumulating evidence indicates that insomnia undermines not only the health and well-being of employees, but also their effectiveness in their jobs. Research indicates that insomnia leads to hostility at work, low job satisfaction , high levels of unethical behavior , high levels of cyberloafing , and even abusive supervision behavior by leaders . Thus, employee insomnia is an issue that e...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 4, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Treating seasonal affective disorder with cognitive behavioural therapy is comparable to light therapy
The overall lifetime prevalence of seasonal affective disorder (SAD) ranges as high as 9.7%.1 Light therapy, where bright artificial light is used to replace diminished sunlight, can be an effective non-drug treatment for SAD.2 However, alternative non-drug treatment approaches are also needed. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is an established and effective treatment for depressive disorders.3 Limited research examining CBT adapted specifically for SAD (CBT-SAD) is available. This paper reports initial findings from a large 5-year randomised clinical trial funded by the National Institute of Mental...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - October 3, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cognitive-behavioural therapy-based intervention to reduce fear of falling in older people: therapy development and randomised controlled trial - the Strategies for Increasing Independence, Confidence and Energy (STRIDE) study
Falls cause fear, anxiety and loss of confidence, resulting in activity avoidance, social isolation and increasing frailty. The umbrella term for these problems is'fear of falling', seen in up to 85% of older adults who fall. Evidence of effectiveness of physical and psychological interventions is limited, with no previous studies examining the role of an individually delivered cognitive –behavioural therapy (CBT) approach. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - October 3, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A randomized controlled trial exploring the effects of brief anger management on community-based offenders in Malta - Henwood KS, Browne KD, Chou S.
The aim of this article is to examine the effects of a short-term one-to-one anger management program delivered to community-based offenders in Malta. The program delivered was the Individual Managing Anger Program (I-MAP), a Cognitive behavioural therapy ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 2, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Program and Other Evaluations, Effectiveness Studies Source Type: news

Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), third-wave CBT and interpersonal therapy (IPT) based interventions for preventing depression in children and adolescents
Depression is common in young people. It has a marked negative impact and is associated with self-harm and suicide. Preventing its onset would be an important advance in public health. This is an update of a Cochrane review that was last updated in 2011. To determine whether evidence-based psychological interventions (including cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), interpersonal therapy (IPT) and third wave CBT)) are effective in preventing the onset of depressive disorder in children and adolescents. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - September 30, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Book Review: Listening, Learning, Caring & Counselling
Australian mental-health expert Dr. Cate Howell, the author of Listening, Learning, Caring & Counselling: The Essential Manual for Psychologists, Psychiatrists, Counsellors and Other Healthcare Professionals on Caring for Their Clients, has over thirty years’ experience in the healthcare field and began in occupational therapy. Her specialty is mental health and she is trained in clinical hypnosis, couple therapy, cognitive therapy, acceptance and commitment therapy, and interpersonal therapy. She wrote this book not as a skills training resource, but as a guide to her way of counseling which she calls, “li...
Source: Psych Central - September 24, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Stan Rockwell, PsyD Tags: Book Reviews Career Cognitive-Behavioral Disorders General Health Insurance Mindfulness Professional Psychiatry Psychological Assessment Psychology Psychotherapy Students Treatment Anxiety Disorder books for mental health pro Source Type: news

CBT 'can help chronic pain patients get better sleep'
People suffering chronicpain due to conditions such asarthritis could benefit from cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) to help them get better sleep. This is according to a new study from the University of Warwick, which has demonstrated the impact that certain modes of thinking can have on sleeping habits among chronic pain patients, as well as highlighting ways this problem could be addressed. The impact of negative thinking on sleep Published in the Journal of ClinicalSleep Medicine, the research centred on the development of a new scale to measure beliefs about sleep and pain in long-term pain patients, while also exam...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - September 23, 2016 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Sleep is key to curing chronic pain
A ink between chronic pain and lack of sleep has been identified by a team of researchers. They also discovered that people with pain who believe they won't be able to sleep are more likely to suffer from insomnia, thus causing worse pain. A pioneering study could lead to specific cognitive therapy to cure insomnia and treat chronic pain. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - September 21, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

The Trouble With Mindfulness Apps
This article was originally published on Mindful. Read the original article. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post)
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 19, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Experiences and engagement with the design features and strategies of an internet-delivered treatment programme for generalised anxiety disorder: a service-based evaluation - Walsh A, Richards D.
BACKGROUND: Outcome research has highlighted the efficacy of internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (iCBT). Some process research has examined users experiences of iCBT. Understanding the user experience provides valuable feedback to developers of in... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 10, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Media, Marketing, and Internet Issues Source Type: news

A parallel-group, randomized controlled trial into the effectiveness of Mindfulness-Based Compassionate Living (MBCL) compared to treatment-as-usual in recurrent depression: trial design and protocol - Schuling R, Huijbers MJ, van Ravesteijn H, Donders R, Kuyken W, Speckens AE.
BACKGROUND: Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) has been shown to reduce the risk of relapse in patients with recurrent depression, but relapse rates remain high. To further improve outcome for this group of patients, follow-up interventions may be ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 3, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Program and Other Evaluations, Effectiveness Studies Source Type: news

Flexibility And Love: Reaching The Children With Cartoons
I'm excited to see how acceptance, mindfulness, and values is entering into the culture. Nothing shows that more clearly than the media. This is especially true in films and cartoons for children. I can't think of a better place to start! One of my younger son's favorite shows is "Steven Universe". Both he and I share the name of the main character -- which is a source of chuckles. In a new episode called "Mindful Education" Steven and Connie combine to form "Stevonnie" (characters do that in this show ... ah, its a long story). Once combined they work on their fighting skills but in this ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Randomised, waiting list controlled trial of cognitive-behavioural therapy for persistent postconcussional symptoms after predominantly mild-moderate traumatic brain injury - Potter SD, Brown RG, Fleminger S.
BACKGROUND: Persistent postconcussional symptoms (PCS) can be a source of distress and disability following traumatic brain injury (TBI). Such symptoms have been viewed as difficult to treat but may be amenable to psychological approaches such as cognitive... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 13, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Preliminary effectiveness of adjunct mindfulness-based cognitive therapy to prevent suicidal behavior in outpatients who are at elevated suicide risk - Chesin MS, Sonmez CC, Benjamin-Phillips CA, Beeler B, Brodsky BS, Stanley B.
Suicidal behavior is an important public health problem. A few efficacious treatments to prevent suicidal behavior exist. The feasibility and broad applicability of these interventions to suicidal individuals are, however, limited. We thus developed a nove... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 13, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Program and Other Evaluations, Effectiveness Studies Source Type: news

Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), third-wave CBT and interpersonal therapy (IPT) based interventions for preventing depression in children and adolescents - Hetrick SE, Cox GR, Witt KG, Bir JJ, Merry SN.
BACKGROUND: Depression is common in young people. It has a marked negative impact and is associated with self-harm and suicide. Preventing its onset would be an important advance in public health. This is an update of a Cochrane review that was last update... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 12, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Dynamic Psychotherapy Delivered in Community Mental Health Centers Works for Depression Dynamic Psychotherapy Delivered in Community Mental Health Centers Works for Depression
Dynamic psychotherapy (DT) works as well as cognitive therapy (CT) in treating major depressive disorder in the community mental health care setting, according to a comparative effectiveness analysis.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - August 11, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Psychiatry News Source Type: news

Why Do Teens Cut and What Can Parents Do To Help?
McLean Hospital Guest Blogger Michael R. Hollander, PhD Approximately 14 to 18 percent of high school students and between 12 to 35 percent of college students in the United States engage in some form of self-injurious behavior at least once. The age of onset often occurs in early adolescence, between the ages of 11 and 14. While self-harm is of serious concern for parents, families, and teachers, it's important to know that when the right approach and treatment is provided in a timely manner, this behavior is highly treatable. But kids who self-harm need treatment right away. Giving in to pleas for more time and delayin...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 11, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cognitive therapy startup Koko raises $2.5M, launches chatbot with Kik messaging service
New York-based startup Koko, which uses artificial intelligence for crowd-sourced cognitive therapy, raised $2.5M in Series A funding, with Omidyar Network and Union Square Ventures leading the round. The company also announced the launch of KokoBot, its new chatbox experience that will be available on chat networks Facebook Messenger, Telegram and Kik. (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - August 9, 2016 Category: Information Technology Source Type: news

Cognitive-behavioural therapy-based intervention to reduce fear of falling in older people: therapy development and randomised controlled trial - the Strategies for Increasing Independence, Confidence and Energy (STRIDE) study - Parry SW, Bamford C, Deary V, Finch TL, Gray J, Macdonald C, McMeekin P, Sabin NJ, Steen IN, Whitney SL, McColl EM.
BACKGROUND: Falls cause fear, anxiety and loss of confidence, resulting in activity avoidance, social isolation and increasing frailty. The umbrella term for these problems is 'fear of falling', seen in up to 85% of older adults who fall. Evidence of effec... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 4, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Elder Adults Source Type: news

Cost and Outcome of Behavioural Activation versus Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for depression (COBRA): a randomised, controlled, non-inferiority trial - Richards DA, Ekers D, McMillan D, Taylor RS, Byford S, Warren FC, Barrett B, Farrand PA, Gilbody S, Kuyken W, O'Mahen H, Watkins ER, Wright KA, Hollon SD, Reed N, Rhodes S, Fletcher E, Finning K.
BACKGROUND: Depression is a common, debilitating, and costly disorder. Many patients request psychological therapy, but the best-evidenced therapy-cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT)-is complex and costly. A simpler therapy-behavioural activation (BA)-migh... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - July 29, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Improving accessibility of cognitive behavioural therapy for children and adolescents: review of evidence and future directions - Bekker MJ, Griffiths KM, Barrett PM.
Background Despite great progress in Cognitive Behavioural Therapies (CBTs) for children and adolescents over the last two decades, as many as four out of five young people who could benefit from therapy are not accessing it. The demand on available ser... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - July 26, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

The Lancet: Simpler, cheaper psychological treatment as effective as cognitive behavioural therapy for treating depression
( The Lancet ) A simple and inexpensive psychotherapy or talking therapy known as behavioral activation (BA) is as effective at treating depression in adults as the gold-standard cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), and can be delivered by non-specialist staff with minimal training at far less cost, according to new research published in The Lancet. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 22, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Changes in brain activity after mindfulness-based cognitive therapy in adolescents
Researchers are studying how cognitive therapy that uses mindfulness techniques, such as meditation, quiet reflection and facilitator-led discussion, may serve as an adjunct to pharmacological treatments for youth with anxiety disorders. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - July 20, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Study shows changes in brain activity after mindfulness therapy in adolescents
(University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center) Researchers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) are studying how cognitive therapy that uses mindfulness techniques, such as meditation, quiet reflection and facilitator-led discussion, may serve as an adjunct to pharmacological treatments in youth with anxiety disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 20, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

The use of psychological interventions for adult male sex offenders with a learning disability: a systematic review - Cohen G, Harvey J.
There is a drive to attend to the specific treatment needs of sexual offenders with a learning disability (LD) and increasing recognition of treatment limitations in this group. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT)-based sex offender treatment programmes (S... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - July 19, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Jurisprudence, Laws, Legislation, Policies, Rules Source Type: news

Both paroxetine and impramine appear to be ineffective in adolescents with major depression, furthermore doubts have risen about their safety
Adolescents suffering from major depression often receive treatment with antidepressants. However the evidence for the efficacy of both newer antidepressants and tricyclic antidepressants in major depression in adolescence is very limited. Systematic reviews1 found a statistically significant difference in efficacy in favour of antidepressants versus placebo, which was not clinically relevant. However, they concluded that the large majority of studies on this topic shows serious methodological flaws, selecting patients with advertisements, excluding patients with suicide r...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - July 12, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

6 Surprising Ways to Boost the Effectiveness of Antidepressants
By: Julia Bowyer Over the past few decades, antidepressant use has risen exponentially. A 2011 report from the National Center for Health Statistics found that between the years 1988 to 1994 and 2005 to 2008, the number of American teens and adults taking this medication has increased by almost 400 percent. Yes, you read that right--400 percent. This alarming number begs a major question: Are people more depressed than ever? A 2014 article in Psychology Today seems to think so. A few reasons they cite for the significant spike in mental health issues include a possible decline in the stigma and speculation that we are, in...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 11, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Triabrain And Answers Unleashed
Have you ever thought about someone and they emailed seconds later? Can thoughts heal your body? Is the brain able to predict new technology? When I first wrote my HuffPost Lucy movie review, people around the globe commented about what I shared regarding the human brain's power. But that article was simply the "tip of the iceberg." I first became knowledgeable about the brain when my mother was in a catastrophic accident, and she required emergency brain surgery to survive. After the surgery, she was tasked with relearning how to eat, walk, talk, and remember again. And I have been by her side ever since. And th...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - July 8, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Schizophrenia
Search Google for cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and you’ll find this: “A type of psychotherapy in which negative patterns of thought about the self and the world are challenged in order to alter unwanted behavior patterns or treat mood disorders such as depression.” On the surface, it seems unlikely that this type of therapy would be associated with people suffering from schizophrenia, a serious mental disorder affecting approximately one percent of the world’s population. But it may be an effective supplementary therapy to pharmacological treatment for those with the disorder. Post-hospital ca...
Source: Psych Central - July 8, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Nicole Trach & Dr. Austin Mardon Tags: Cognitive-Behavioral Disorders General Medications Psychotherapy Schizophrenia Treatment Beck Institute Behaviour therapy Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Depression Mental Disorder Mental Health Psychiatry Psychology Psychosis Source Type: news

Cancer-related fatigue in palliative care: a global perspective
Apart from exercise, cognitive behavioural therapy and psychosocial interventions, there is an absence of high quality evidence that favours any particular pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments for cancer-related fatigue. In this article the authors argue that a personalised integrative oncology approach can lead to effective management. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - July 5, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The impact and utility of computerised therapy for educationally alienated teenagers: the views of adolescents who participated in an alternative education-based trial - Fleming T, Lucassen M, Stasiak K, Shepherd M, Merry S.
Background Computerised cognitive behavioural therapy (cCBT) has the potential to increase access to therapy for underserved groups. We aimed to explore the views of adolescents attending alternative education (AE) programmes who participated in a trial... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 27, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

To Help A Criminal Go Straight, Help Him Change How He Thinks
More than half of prisoners released from prison are rearrested within a year. Cognitive therapy can help prisoners change the thinking that gets them in trouble, like "I'll never back down." (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - June 26, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jack Bush Source Type: news

Almost half of all UK adults may be living with chronic pain
Conclusion This systematic review aimed to combine available data on the prevalence of chronic pain in the UK adult population. The 19 identified studies suggested that 43% of people in the UK experience chronic pain. However, there are both strengths and limitations to this review that may affect the reliability of this finding. The review has strengths in the careful search methods which aimed to identify only studies relevant to the general population. The researchers also did their best to provide the most reliable estimate by performing a quality assessment of studies and excluding those at particularly high risk of ...
Source: NHS News Feed - June 21, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medical practice Medication Mental health Neurology Older people Source Type: news

Improvements in executive attention, rumination, cognitive reactivity, and mindfulness among high-suicide risk patients participating in adjunct mindfulness-based cognitive therapy: preliminary findings - Chesin MS, Benjamin-Phillips CA, Keilp J, Fertuck EA, Brodsky BS, Stanley B.
OBJECTIVE: To test changes to cognitive functioning among high-suicide risk outpatients participating in an adjunct mindfulness-based intervention combining mindfulness-based cognitive therapy and safety planning (MBCT-S). DESIGN: Ten outpatients w... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 20, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Program and Other Evaluations, Effectiveness Studies Source Type: news

Depressed, Out of Work? Study Suggests Skills to Help Land a Job
Unemployed people were more likely to land a job if they used skills commonly taught as part of cognitive therapy for depression, a new study found. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - June 15, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Depressed, out of work? Study suggests skills to help land a job
(Ohio State University) Unemployed people were more likely to land a job if they used skills commonly taught as part of cognitive therapy for depression, a new study found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Depression blood test could lead to personalised treatments
Conclusion This study shows how a new blood test in development can help identify people with depression who are most and least likely to benefit from antidepressants. While promising, the test is far from perfect. For example, it missed 39-43% of non-responders, meaning these people would continue to receive standard antidepressant treatment that is unlikely to work for them. A large proportion of patients (22-38%) also fell into the "intermediate" group who were neither responders nor non-responders, so the test wasn't too useful here. This means there is a significant proportion of people with...
Source: NHS News Feed - June 7, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Mental health Medication Source Type: news