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Researchers Uncover Surprises About Celiac Disease
Title: Researchers Uncover Surprises About Celiac DiseaseCategory: Health NewsCreated: 5/31/2016 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 6/1/2016 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Digestion General)
Source: MedicineNet Digestion General - June 1, 2016 Category: Nutrition Source Type: news

Researchers uncover surprises about celiac disease
HealthDay News New research has revealed some surprising findings about who develops celiac disease in the United States. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - May 31, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Researchers Uncover Surprises about Celiac Disease
Immune condition most common among people descended from the Punjab region of India Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Page: Celiac Disease (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - May 31, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Researchers Uncover Surprises About Celiac Disease
TUESDAY, May 31, 2016 -- New research has revealed some surprising findings about who develops celiac disease in the United States. The study found that it's most common among people whose ancestors came from India's Punjab region. Previously,... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - May 31, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

Researchers Uncover Surprises About Celiac Disease
Immune condition most common among people descended from the Punjab region of India (Source: Fertility News - Doctors Lounge)
Source: Fertility News - Doctors Lounge - May 30, 2016 Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: webmaster at doctorslounge.com Tags: Family Medicine, Gastroenterology, Pediatrics, Reproductive Medicine, Research, Immunology, Nutrition, News, Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Minute: The Truth About Gluten
May is Celiac Awareness Month, and the Celiac Disease Foundation wants to make the process of going gluten-free easier for people with celiac disease, an autoimmune disease. Mayo Clinic experts agree that people with celiac disease should not consume gluten. But, many people who don't have celiac disease also go gluten-free, because it makes them [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - May 30, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Gluten-Free Shaming is not OK
May is Celiac Awareness month and with that in mind, I'd like to thank Elle Magazine for raising awareness by posting the picture above to a combined following of 5.6 million people on their social media accounts with the caption "We all have that friend... " Hahahaha. So funny! It reminds me of a time I saw someone making fun of a disability recently. What was it again? Oh yeah... Hysterical, right? No. Just mean. Oh well, it didn't stop the person who did it from winning even if it was pretty controversial for a while. Celiac disease has become the source of a lot of humor lately. Q...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 27, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Celiac Sprue
Celiac Disease (Source: eMedicineHealth.com)
Source: eMedicineHealth.com - May 26, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

Stomach cramps and diarrhoea - even on a gluten-free diet? The gut problem that means you must avoid gluten AND dairy
Brenda Denyer, 61, from Surrey, had been diagnosed with coeliac disease. But, like 40 per cent of coeliacs, she later developed lactose intolerance. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 25, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Gut trouble could mean you're allergic to gluten AND dairy
Brenda Denyer, 61, from Surrey, had been diagnosed with coeliac disease. But, like 40 per cent of people diagnosed with coeliac disease, she later develop lactose intolerance. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 24, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Ask JJ: Optimal Bone Health
Dear JJ: My doctor warned me I'm in the beginning stages of bone loss and that I need to be taking preventative measures now. My mom and grandma had osteoporosis. What steps can I take right now to reduce its impact? Decreased bone mineral density and altered bone protein are among the early warning signs of osteoporosis, the most common bone disease. While it affects everyone, older women become more susceptible than men to osteoporosis. Researchers estimate 35 percent of postmenopausal Caucasian women have hip, spine, or distal forearm osteoporosis. Regardless of gender, your risk increases with age because bones be...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 23, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Most Popular NEJM Group Feature This Week: Celiac Clinical Pearls (FREE)
By the Editors Here's the most clicked-on item we featured from … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - May 20, 2016 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Should Rosacea Patients Be Screened for Autoimmune Diseases?Should Rosacea Patients Be Screened for Autoimmune Diseases?
Dr Graeme Lipper reviews a population-based case-control study that explored the link between rosacea, type 1 diabetes, celiac disease, multiple sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Medscape Dermatology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - May 20, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Dermatology Viewpoint Source Type: news

Your NEJM Group Today: Celiac Clinical Pearls, ID Link-O-Rama, Massachusetts Primary Care Opportunities (FREE)
By the Editors NEJM Group offers so many valuable resources for practicing clinicians. Here's what we chose for you today:Now@NEJM: … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - May 17, 2016 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Study: Gluten-free diet unhealthy for people without celiac disease
Stephen FellerNEW YORK, N.C., May 16 (UPI) -- Children on a gluten-free diet who do not have celiac disease or another diagnosed allergy do not experience health benefits from the diet, researchers found. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - May 16, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Experts Warn That Gluten-Free Diets May Be Risky For Kids
Putting kids on gluten-free diets even if they don't have celiac disease or a wheat allergy may carry more risks than benefits, experts warned. In recent years, gluten-free diets have become increasingly popular. A 2015 survey found that 25 percent of Americans said they consume some gluten-free foods, up from just 8 percent in 2013, according to the market research company Mintel Group. However, celiac disease (CD), the immune condition that makes people sick if they eat gluten, is very rare. Less than 1 percent of people in the United States have celiac disease. Some people who start a gluten-free diet may have misc...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 16, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Gluten-free isn't healthy choice for most children, pediatrician says
There is more risk than benefit to a gluten-free diet for people — especially children — who haven't been diagnosed with celiac disease or wheat allergy, according to the Journal of Pediatrics. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - May 13, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

Separating fact from fiction in gluten-free
There is more risk than benefit to a gluten-free diet for people — especially children — who haven't been diagnosed with celiac disease or wheat allergy, according to the Journal of Pediatrics. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - May 13, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

The gluten-free diet in children: Do the risks outweigh the benefits?
The prevalence of celiac disease (CD), an autoimmune disease, is increasing. The only treatment for CD is a gluten-free diet. However, the increasing prevalence of CD does not account for the disproportionate increase in growth of the gluten-free food industry (136 percent from 2013 to 2015). Experts discuss several of the most common inaccuracies regarding the gluten-free diet. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 13, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

The gluten-free diet in children: Do the risks outweigh the benefits?
(Elsevier Health Sciences) The prevalence of celiac disease (CD), an autoimmune disease, is increasing. The only treatment for CD is a gluten-free diet. However, the increasing prevalence of CD does not account for the disproportionate increase in growth of the gluten-free food industry (136 percent from 2013 to 2015). A Commentary scheduled for publication in The Journal of Pediatrics discusses several of the most common inaccuracies regarding the gluten-free diet. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 13, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Patients with coeliac disease should receive pneumonia vaccine
(Wiley) Researchers have found that patients with coeliac disease are at high risk of acquiring pneumonia if they haven't received the pneumococcal vaccine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 13, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Abdominal pain and bloating? You could be gluten intolerant or suffer with THIS disease
ABDOMINAL pain and bloating are symptoms of gluten intolerence but they could also be an indicator of a much more serious condition - coeliac disease. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - May 11, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

In US, celiac disease diagnosis is most common among patients with Punjabi ancestry
About 1.8 million Americans have celiac disease, an immune-based condition brought on by the consumption of gluten in genetically susceptible patients. Among patients diagnosed with celiac disease by small intestinal biopsy in the US, those from the Punjab region of India have the highest rates of disease, according to new research. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 9, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

NIH News in Health
Check out the May issue of NIH News in Health, the monthly newsletter bringing you practical health news and tips based on the latest NIH research.   Sex and Gender How Being Male or Female Can Affect Your Health Men and women are similar in many ways, but sex and social factors can affect your risk for disease, your response to medications, and how often you seek medical care. Read more about sex, gender, and health.       Going Gluten Free? Necessary for Some, Optional for Others A gluten-free diet can be a lifestyle choice for many. But for those with a condition known as celiac dis...
Source: Network News - May 5, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Lisa Smith Tags: NIH Source Type: news

Jury Still Out on Celiac Disease Screening, U.S. Doctors SayJury Still Out on Celiac Disease Screening, U.S. Doctors Say
There isn't enough evidence yet to say whether widespread screening for celiac disease makes sense, according to draft guidelines proposed by U.S. physicians. Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Gastroenterology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Gastroenterology Headlines - May 5, 2016 Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Gastroenterology News Source Type: news

USPSTF: Evidence Lacking to Support Screening for Celiac Disease
The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force released its first-ever draft recommendation statement on May 3 on screening asymptomatic patients for celiac disease. (Source: AAFP News)
Source: AAFP News - May 5, 2016 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Jury still out on celiac disease screening, U.S. doctors say
(Reuters Health) - There isn’t enough evidence yet to say whether widespread screening for celiac disease makes sense, according to draft guidelines proposed by U.S. physicians. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - May 3, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

USPSTF: Not Enough Evidence to Recommend For or Against Screening for Celiac Disease (FREE)
By Amy Orciari Herman Edited by David G. Fairchild, MD, MPH, and Lorenzo Di Francesco, MD, FACP, FHM The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force says there isn't enough evidence to weigh the benefits and … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - May 3, 2016 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Message from the Minister of Health - Celiac Awareness Month - May 2016
As Minister of Health and as a physician, I know how important it is to shed light on the health challenges Canadians face. Each year in May, we recognize Celiac Awareness Month, a disease that affects approximately 1 in 133 Canadians, with more people being diagnosed annually as awareness of this disease continues to grow. (Source: Government of Canada News - Health Canada)
Source: Government of Canada News - Health Canada - May 3, 2016 Category: American Health Authors: Health Canada Source Type: news

Here's how Oregon ranks in prices for common medical procedures
Oregon is one of the most expensive states in the country when it comes to medical procedures, according to a study out today from the Health Care Cost Institute in Washington, D.C. and published in the journal Health Affairs. Oregon scored about 34 percent above the national average for 162 common services in 2015. The state was especially high in imaging and some diagnostic tests, such as celiac, protein and thyroid, said lead author David Newman, executive director of the Institute. Prices varied… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - April 28, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Elizabeth Hayes Source Type: news

Researchers hunt for the causes and basis of wheat sensitivities
(Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz) Up to five percent of all people who eat wheat products suffer from wheat sensitivities. These are immunological responses to wheat and related cereals such as spelt, rye, and barley, and include celiac disease, wheat allergy, and non-celiac-non allergy wheat sensitivity. Now doctors and biomedical and agricultural researchers at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz and the University of Hohenheim have joined forces to study these disorders, especially NCWS. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 14, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Rosacea linked to several autoimmune diseases in women
Rosacea in women is linked with an increased risk for a wide variety of autoimmune disorders including type 1 diabetes, celiac disease, multiple sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis, according to a large population-based case-control study. The finding expands the association of rosacea and... (Source: Skin and Allergy News)
Source: Skin and Allergy News - April 13, 2016 Category: Dermatology Source Type: news

Rosacea linked to several autoimmune diseases in women
Rosacea in women is linked with an increased risk for a wide variety of autoimmune disorders including type 1 diabetes, celiac disease, multiple sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis, according to a... (Source: Clinical Neurology News)
Source: Clinical Neurology News - April 13, 2016 Category: Neurology Source Type: news

When Education Is Met With Ire
Since receiving my celiac diagnosis just over three years ago, I've learned a lot along the way. I'm sure that if you're reading this and you have celiac disease that you too are learning something new with every step in your journey back to health. One thing that I have noticed, which I feel is unique to celiac disease sufferers, is that whenever I try and share my experiences, and what I have learned about my needs with regard to food, my statements are often met with anger, ire, or just completely dismissed. Because going gluten-free has become such a trend, many people are just so misinformed about what celiac disease...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 11, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Key gene in development of celiac disease has been found in 'junk' DNA
40% of the population carry the main risk factor for celiac disease but only 1% develop the disease. A newly found gene that influences its development has been found in what until recently has been known as ‘junk’ DNA. Celiac disease is a chronic, immunological disease that is manifested as intolerance to gluten proteins present in wheats to an inflammatory reaction in the small intestine that hampers the absorption of nutrients. The only treatment is a strict, life-long, gluten-free diet. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 8, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

A key gene in the development of celiac disease has been found in 'junk' DNA
(University of the Basque Country ) Forty percent of the population carry the main risk factor for celiac disease but only 1 percent go down with it. A new gene that influences its development has been found in what until recently has been known as 'junk' DNA. The research, in which a UPV/EHU group has participated, has been published in Science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 8, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

VIDEO: Myths and truths of gluten-free diets
PHILADELPHIA – Do you have patients with undiagnosed celiac disease or legitimate gluten sensitivity, or are they self-diagnosing with the need to steer clear of gluten, only to find themselves in... (Source: Family Practice News)
Source: Family Practice News - April 6, 2016 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Gluten: What Is Gluten? Facts, Foods and Allergies
This article also gives tips for avoiding gluten in your diet. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 5, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Clues to celiac disease found in 'junk RNA'
Celiac disease is a relatively common immune disorder affecting the gut; recent research finds clues to its origin in the mysterious genomic world of long noncoding RNA molecules. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: GastroIntestinal / Gastroenterology Source Type: news

[Report] A long noncoding RNA associated with susceptibility to celiac disease
Recent studies have implicated long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) as regulators of many important biological processes. Here we report on the identification and characterization of a lncRNA, lnc13, that harbors a celiac disease–associated haplotype block and represses expression of certain inflammatory genes under homeostatic conditions. Lnc13 regulates gene expression by binding to hnRNPD, a member of a family of ubiquitously expressed heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs). Upon stimulation, lnc13 levels are reduced, thereby allowing increased expression of the repressed genes. Lnc13 levels are significantly ...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 31, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Ainara Castellanos-Rubio Source Type: news

[Perspective] A lncRNA links genomic variation with celiac disease
The majority of human single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with increased disease risk map to noncoding regions of the genome. The nucleotide variations therefore cannot be directly related to changes in the function of proteins. Indeed, SNPs frequently localize to DNA regulatory elements such as enhancers or promoters, or within intergenic regions that are transcribed to produce long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). LncRNAs are RNA molecules longer than 200 nucleotides that do not encode proteins; in many instances, they regulate gene expression through diverse mechanisms. On page 91 of this issue, Castellanos-Rubio...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 31, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Maite Huarte Tags: RNA Source Type: news

Non-invasive test can detect celiac disease in children
Stephen FellerGRANADA, Spain, March 11 (UPI) -- A non-invasive finger prick test could help doctors diagnose celiac disease in young children with minor or no symptoms, according to researchers in Spain. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - March 11, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New, non-invasive method allows to determine whether a child is celiac or not with just a puncture in the finger
A new, simple and non invasive method has been developed that allows clinicians to determine whether a child aged 2-4 suffers from celiac disease or not without the necessity of a blood extraction. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 11, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

New, non-invasive method allows to determine whether a child is celiac or not
(University of Granada) Researchers from the University of Granada have developed a new, quick and economic method that allows to determine if a child aged 2-4 suffers from silent celiac disease (the disease that goes unnoticed for the doctor because it presents minor symptoms, imperceptible even for the patient) (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 11, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

D1 Biopsy Helps Spot Ultra-Short Celiac DiseaseD1 Biopsy Helps Spot Ultra-Short Celiac Disease
Additional biopsy collection from any site in the duodenal bulb (D1) increases conventional celiac disease diagnosis yield and aids detection of ultra-short celiac disease (USCD), according to U.K. and U.S. researchers. Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines - February 18, 2016 Category: Pathology Tags: Gastroenterology News Source Type: news

Can You Really Bottle Energy?
You see it almost everywhere these days — energy drinks that advertise the wonder of B vitamins. And they all claim to give you the energy boost to get you through your day. Sadly, it’s a big marketing ploy. The quick energy in these drinks usually comes from their high sugar and synthetic caffeine content. It’s true that B vitamins are essential to your body’s energy metabolism. And B12 in particular is crucial for energy. When you take in high-quality B12, you unlock the energy contained in the foods you eat and turn it into glucose you can burn. But fortified junk food is no way to get your vita...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - February 16, 2016 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Al Sears Tags: Nutrition b12 energy telomeres Source Type: news

Should We All Go Gluten-Free? Should We All Go Gluten-Free?
It is undoubtedly the major dietary trend of the decade, but is there evidence to support avoiding gluten if you don't have celiac disease? Medscape Gastroenterology (Source: Medscape Allergy Headlines)
Source: Medscape Allergy Headlines - February 4, 2016 Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Gastroenterology Expert Column Source Type: news

How An Elimination Diet May Improve Your Child’s Health
Photo Courtesy of Simon & Schuster Maya Shetreat-Klein, MD is an integrative pediatric neurologist. Her new book, The Dirt Cure is published by Atria Publishing Group, a sister company of CBS. She lectures internationally to medical professionals and laypeople on environmental health and toxins, and healing with food and nature. Many children in my practice improve tremendously from any number of conditions—asthma, eczema, constipation, headaches, ADHD, seizures—when we remove foods that bother their bodies. Unfortunately, traditional allergy tests don’t always tell the whole story of food reactivity....
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 26, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: cbskapost Tags: Health Allergies Allergy Best Of Boston's Best CBS Local Food Kids Maya Shetreat Klein Parenting peanuts Simon and Schuster The Dirt Cure Top Spots Source Type: news

BioLineRx Receives Confirmation of Medical Device Classification in Europe for Celiac Treatment
BL-7010 receives designation as Class IIb medical device TEL AVIV, Israel, January 25, 2016 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- BioLineRx Ltd. (NASDAQ/TASE: BLRX), a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company dedicated to identifying, in-licensi... Biopharmaceuticals, Devices, RegulatoryBioLineRx, Celiac disease, BL-7010 (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - January 25, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Well: When Athletes Go Gluten Free
A new, carefully designed study of the effects of gluten-free diets on athletic performance suggests that giving up gluten may not provide the benefits that many healthy athletes hope for. (Source: NYT)
Source: NYT - January 20, 2016 Category: American Health Authors: GRETCHEN REYNOLDS Tags: Fitness Move Celiac Disease Exercise Gluten Phys Ed Featured Diet and Nutrition Source Type: news