Log in to search using one of your social media accounts:

 

50 years ago, Clomid gave birth to the era of assisted reproduction
(Brown University) In the journal Fertility and Sterility, Dr. Eli Adashi writes a history and appreciation of the wonder drug Clomid, which radically changed what doctors could do for couples struggling to have children. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 13, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Acupuncture may not be effective in treating infertility
(Penn State) Acupuncture, alone or with the medication clomiphene, does not appear to be effective in treating infertility in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), according to an international team of researchers. The finding casts doubts on previous smaller trials that have suggested that acupuncture may improve reproductive function in women affected by infertility. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 27, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Clomiphene Citrate-induced Visual Hallucinations Clomiphene Citrate-induced Visual Hallucinations
This case raises awareness of an unusual and disturbing side effect associated with clomiphene citrate, used to induce ovulation in polycystic ovary disease and infertility.Journal of Medical Case Reports (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - May 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Ob/Gyn & Women ' s Health Journal Article Source Type: news

Couple Announces Pregnancy With Emotional Tribute To Fertility Struggles
After trying to conceive for almost three years, a Texas couple announced their pregnancy news with a tribute to their fertility struggles. On Feb. 9, Lauren Walker of The Woodlands posted a photo of needles and medication bottles encircling two baby onesies. One onesie has the words “Worth the Wait,” while the other reads, “and Wait and Wait and Wait.” In the caption, she explained that she and her husband Garyt are expecting twins, a boy and girl due in August. ”We prayed for 953 days...,” Walker wrote. “452 Needles. 1000’s of tears, 1 corrective surgery...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Your NEJM Group Today: Digital Health in Real-World Settings / Letrozole vs. Clomiphene for Infertility / Florida Hospitalist Opportunity (FREE)
By the Editors Here's what we chose for you today from NEJM Group:NEJM Catalyst: Many digital … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - February 13, 2017 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Frank Palopoli, Who Aided Fertility With Clomid Drug, Dies at 94
Millions of women have become pregnant because of the drug Mr. Palopoli and his team of researchers developed in the 1950s. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - August 12, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: SAM ROBERTS Tags: Deaths (Obituaries) Fertility Drugs In Vitro Fertilization Palopoli, Frank Source Type: news

What to Expect When You're... Still Not Expecting
IVF Isn't About the Journey, It's About the Destination While some women may share their birth stories, I wanted to share our fertility story. Translating my mind's weavings into words on paper has helped me weather numerous storms, but throughout 2015 -- a year marred by a lot of heartbreak and too many hormonal injections -- when I've needed this kind of therapy the most, I maintained silence on a subject that hit me like a piece of fallen scaffolding. Instead, I relied heavily on the physical support of my husband, family and friends, all for whom I am extremely grateful. With each setback along this grueling and at ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Trying to Conceive: Clomid Questions
Title: Trying to Conceive: Clomid QuestionsCategory: Doctor's & Expert's views on SymptomsCreated: 10/22/2004 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 4/15/2016 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Womens Health General)
Source: MedicineNet Womens Health General - April 15, 2016 Category: OBGYN Source Type: news

Is Taking Birth Control Pills A Band-Aid Treatment For PCOS?
I remember in my early training that the first question to ask a patient with polycystic ovary syndrome was: "Are you trying to get pregnant?" If no, hand them the birth control pill. If yes, choose between clomid, a fertility drug, and metformin, an insulin sensitizer. No questions related to lifestyle, stress, nutrition, total toxic burden – there were 29 more patients to get to that day. It turns out, many lifestyle changes have been shown to pull someone out of the metabolic chaos of PCOS, therefore decreasing their chances of developing comorbidities such as diabetes, heart disease, hypertension, ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 31, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Comparing Treatments for Unexplained Infertility
Results from a clinical trial support the continued use of clomiphene as the first-line therapy for ovarian stimulation in couples with unexplained infertility. (Source: NIH Research Matters)
Source: NIH Research Matters - October 8, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

How Effective Is Metformin Plus Clomiphene in Women With PCOS?How Effective Is Metformin Plus Clomiphene in Women With PCOS?
Dr Peter Kovacs summarizes a systemic review comparing metformin plus clomiphene vs gonadotropins and other treatments for improving fertility in women with clomiphene-resistant PCOS. Medscape Ob/Gyn (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - September 29, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Ob/Gyn & Women ' s Health Viewpoint Source Type: news

Fewer Multiple Births Seen With Femara for Infertility (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- But rate of clinical pregnancies lower than Menopur or Clomid (Source: MedPage Today Endocrinology)
Source: MedPage Today Endocrinology - September 25, 2015 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Treating unexplained infertility: Answers still needed
In this study, a national network of investigators looked at how the drug letrozole compared with two standard drugs to stimulate ovulation. Letrozole works to stimulate ovulation through a different path than traditional fertility medications. Investigators assigned cver a thousand couples with unexplained infertility to as many as four rounds of treatment with either letrozole or one of two “standard treatments”: gonadotropin (Menopur is one brand name) or clomiphene (Clomid is a common brand name). The results: live birth rates were lower in the women who took letrozole (19%) as compared with gonadotropin (3...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - September 24, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Ecker, MD Tags: Family Planning and Pregnancy fertility treatments infertility ovulation induction Source Type: news

Multiple-Birth Rates Lower With Letrozole Than GonadotropinMultiple-Birth Rates Lower With Letrozole Than Gonadotropin
Ovarian stimulation using letrozole results in fewer multiple gestations than gonadotropin, but not compared with clomiphene, in couples treated for unexplained infertility. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape ObGyn and Womens Health Headlines)
Source: Medscape ObGyn and Womens Health Headlines - September 24, 2015 Category: OBGYN Tags: Ob/Gyn & Women ' s Health News Source Type: news

Letrozole No Better Than Clomiphene for Unexplained Infertility (FREE)
By Robert W. Rebar, MD Dr. Rebar is an associate editor with NEJM Journal Watch Women's Health, from which this story was adapted. See full coverage at the link below.The aromatase inhibitor letrozole is not superior to clomiphene for the treatment of unexplained infertility, a New England Journal of Medicine study finds. … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - September 24, 2015 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Standard treatment better than potential alternative for unexplained infertility
Clomiphene more effective than letrozole for achieving pregnancy, NIH funded study finds. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - September 23, 2015 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Clomiphene-associated suicide behavior in a man treated for hypogonadism: case report and review of the literature - Knight JC, Pandit AS, Rich AM, Trevisani GT, Rabinowitz T.
[Abstract unavailable] Language: en... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - September 19, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

4 Frustrating Facts About PCOS... and What They Mean for You
Depression. Weight gain. Increased acne and hair growth. Irregular periods. Infertility. These are some of the most notable symptoms of one of the most common hormonal, metabolic and reproductive disorders found in women: polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). So, what is PCOS exactly? Women with PCOS have too many male hormones and not enough female hormones, which interferes with ovulation. With PCOS, the ovaries are typically enlarged and may even contain multiple small cyst-like structures (immature ovarian follicles). If left untreated, this hormone imbalance can affect everything from a woman's menstrual cycle, to her a...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 10, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

In Search of Answers for Those Struggling With Infertility
Dr. Erin Wolff peers into a microscope in her lab at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Through the magnifying lens, she examines an egg from the ovary of one of her patients, a young woman with a rare autoimmune disease called GATA2 deficiency. The patient is about to undergo chemotherapy and a bone marrow transplant, the only known treatment for her disease and one that will likely damage her ovaries, rendering her infertile. Dr. Wolff has extracted some of her eggs so that one day, through in vitro fertilization, the patient may have the chance to become a mother. "That is why I went into this line of me...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 21, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Letrozole Produces More Babies in Women With PCOSLetrozole Produces More Babies in Women With PCOS
The breast cancer drug letrozole, used off label to stimulate ovulation, produces 44% more births among infertile women than standard treatment with clomiphene, according to a new study of 750 women. Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape ObGyn and Womens Health Headlines)
Source: Medscape ObGyn and Womens Health Headlines - July 10, 2014 Category: OBGYN Tags: Ob/Gyn & Women ' s Health News Source Type: news

Aromatase Inhibitor Boosts Fertility in POS
(MedPage Today) -- Letrozole (Femara) used off-label to treat infertility outperformed first-line treatment clomiphene, with higher rates of live births in women with polycystic ovary syndrome, researchers reported. (Source: MedPage Today OB/GYN)
Source: MedPage Today OB/GYN - July 10, 2014 Category: OBGYN Source Type: news

Letrozole Leads to Higher Live-Birth Rates Than Clomiphene in Women with PCOS (FREE)
(Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - July 10, 2014 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Study shows fertility drugs do not increase breast cancer risk
(American Association for Cancer Research) Women who took clomiphene citrate (brand name Clomid) or gonadotropins as a part of fertility treatment did not experience an increased risk for breast cancer over 30 years of follow-up, compared with women who were not treated with these medications, according to a study published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 3, 2014 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Fertility Drugs May Not Raise Breast Cancer Risk: Study
But subset of women who took Clomid for more than 12 cycles appeared more likely to get invasive breast cancer (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - April 3, 2014 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: webmaster at doctorslounge.com Tags: Oncology, Fertility, News, Source Type: news

Fertility Drugs May Not Raise Breast Cancer Risk: Study
But subset of women who took Clomid for more than 12 cycles appeared more likely to get invasive breast cancer (Source: Cancercompass News: Breast Cancer)
Source: Cancercompass News: Breast Cancer - April 3, 2014 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Risks of infertility treatments 'overhyped'
Conclusion The study raises concerns about the link between different types of fertility treatment and poorer outcomes at birth. However, it is uncertain whether the higher risk is down to infertility treatment, underlying health problems associated with infertility, or a combination of both. As the authors point out, the study did not control for the underlying cause of fertility problems. Although the risks appear higher, the overall risk of these problems is still low. And although the study excluded multiple births, it had no information on whether the single babies born after fertility treatment were the result of mul...
Source: NHS News Feed - January 9, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medical practice Pregnancy/child Source Type: news

clomiphene, Clomid
Title: clomiphene, ClomidCategory: MedicationsCreated: 3/2/2005 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 9/6/2013 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Medications General)
Source: MedicineNet Medications General - September 6, 2013 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

Trying to Conceive: Clomid Questions
Title: Trying to Conceive: Clomid QuestionsCategory: Doctor's & Expert's views on SymptomsCreated: 10/22/2004 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 8/7/2013 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Womens Health General)
Source: MedicineNet Womens Health General - August 7, 2013 Category: OBGYN Source Type: news

Are My Tubes Blocked? HSG Dye Testing
Many women who have come for tubal reversal surgery and tubal reparative surgery with Dr. Charles Monteith, are interested in knowing if their tubes can become blocked by scar tissue. Tubal blockage after tubal reversal is not a common occurrence and is estimated to happen less than 5% of Chapel Hill Tubal Reversal patients. A member of the Chapel Hill Tubal Reversal Message Board posts, "We had our tr in 2011 got a bfp in 12 but it was ectopic and haven't been able to conceive since. So my ob sent me to a fertility specialist to have a clomid challenge and hsg test done... So hoping my tubes aren't blocked". For...
Source: Tubal Ligation Reversal News - July 9, 2013 Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: news

Estrogen Receptor Drugs May Halt Ebola InfectionEstrogen Receptor Drugs May Halt Ebola Infection
Clomiphene and toremifene have shown survival benefit in a mouse model. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - June 22, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Irregular Periods After Reversing Tubes
A tubal reversal message board member posts on the Tubal Reversal Message Board she is confused by her irregular periods after her tubal ligation reversal. It can be very common to have an irregular period the first several cycles after reversing your tubes but the surgery should not cause you to have a permanent irregularity. If periods continue to be irregular and sporadic then it is very common a woman is not ovulating or releasing eggs every month. When eggs are not released then periods will not occur. This condition can easily be diagnosed by the use of ovulation predictor tests and can be easily treated by a doctor ...
Source: Tubal Ligation Reversal News - June 7, 2013 Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: news

NICE updates clinical guideline on fertility (CG156)
Source: NICE Area: Evidence> Guidelines NICE has updated its 2004 clinical guideline on fertility (CG 156) which offers evidence-based advice on the care and treatment of people with fertility problems.   Under the updated recommendations, NICE says that under certain criteria, women aged between 40 and 42 years should be offered one full cycle of IVF with or without intracytoplasmic sperm, if they have not conceived after two years of regular unprotected intercourse, or 12 cycles of artificial insemination where six or more are by intrauterine insemination. A full cycle is now defined as including one episode...
Source: NeLM - Guidelines - February 20, 2013 Category: UK Health Source Type: news