Alcohol Damage to the Liver – What Happens?
Alcohol Damage to the Liver – What Happens? Alcohol use disorder and heavy drinking present many harmful health risks. They can include everything from high blood pressure to fatal seizures. One of the most well-known health risks that come along with prolonged heavy drinking is liver damage. How does alcohol impact the liver, and what types of alcohol damage to the liver are there? In order to better understand alcohol damage to the liver, it is important to learn how the liver processes alcohol. According to MyDr, there are 2 ways that alcohol can be processed by your liver: Most alcohol is broken down, or metabol...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - March 4, 2020 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Alcohol Alcohol Rehab Information Alcoholism Detox Resources for Alcohol and Drugs/Opiates alcohol abuse alcohol dependence alcohol detox alcohol treatment alcohol treatment center alcohol treatment facility Source Type: blogs

Paracentesis: The Procedure
Discussion: The Z-track method minimizes fluid leakage from the puncture site. Injecting medication into the skin using this method is important to preventing post-procedure leaking. Once a needle has entered subcutaneous tissue and muscle, it opens a track that may not reseal immediately. There are also studies suggesting that Z tracks may reduce pain during injection. We suggest using the method during your paracentesis procedure.Z tracks are used for all kinds of intramuscular injections and can be applied to other sites on the body. Pull and press the skin and tissue 2 cm caudad to the deep abdominal wall and insert th...
Source: The Procedural Pause - March 3, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

The truth about fatty liver
The majority of doctors will tell you that there is nothing you can do to reverse fatty liver and that health problems such as cirrhosis and liver failure may be in your future that they will address with the awful “solution” of liver transplant. The truth is the opposite: fatty liver is easily and readily reversible in virtually everybody, provided you take action before irreversible changes take place and are given the right information and tools. In this video, I discuss the three basic phenomena that drive fat deposition, liver damage, and inflammation that lead to this condition: Carbohydrate consumption ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - January 23, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Open bowel flora carbohydrates carbs Inflammation NAFLD nash triglycerides undoctored wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Long-Term Effect of Binge Drinking on the Body
Most people know about the damaging effects that binge drinking can bring to someone’s life. Loss of enjoyment of life, losing family relationships, financial and career struggles, homelessness, and legal consequences are just the tip of the iceberg. However, it can be more difficult to realize the long-term effect of binge drinking on the body, because you cannot always see it. Frequent binge drinking poses many dangerous health risks, and many of them can lead to death. Facts on Long-Term Effect of Binge Drinking on the Body For men, binge drinking is defined as consuming five or more drinks within about two hour...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - January 17, 2020 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Alcohol Alcohol Rehab Information Alcoholism alcohol abuse alcohol dependence alcohol treatment alcohol treatment center binge binge drinking Source Type: blogs

Ride the Fluid Wave Before Performing a Paracentesis
​Before you break out the bottles for a paracentesis, you may want to consider doing a test for ascites. Many procedures require executing an old-school test before even looking at a result or grabbing an ultrasound machine. Knowing what to look for on a physical exam may guide your practice and intervention dramatically. Using noninvasive tools first could help your patient avoid other tedious or unnecessary testing, which may also result in lost time. Incorporating ultrasound into your practice may also help you nail a diagnosis or allow you to perform a procedure better than you expected.A markedly distended abdomen d...
Source: The Procedural Pause - January 2, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Shock, bradycardia, ST Elevation in V1 and V2. Activate the Cath Lab?
A 60-something with h/o cirrhosis and diabetes called 911 because he felt sick and wasunable to move his lower extremities. On arrival he was bradycardic and hypotensive.He stated that starting approximately 7 hours prior the he felt that he was unable to feel his extremities. At some point after that he contacted his neighbor who came to check on him and called 911. On arrival to the stabilization room he says he can feel his extremities and and states that he justgenerally feels unwell. He denies any chest pain or shortness of breath.p.p1 {margin: 0.1px 0.0px 0.1px 0.2px; font: 11.0px Calibri}EMS repo...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - December 29, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, December 23rd 2019
In this study, by adenovirus-mediated delivery and inducible transgenic mouse models, we demonstrate the proliferation of both HCs and SCs by combined Notch1 and Myc activation in in vitro and in vivo inner ear adult mouse models. These proliferating mature SCs and HCs maintain their respective identities. Moreover, when presented with HC induction signals, reprogrammed adult SCs transdifferentiate into HC-like cells both in vitro and in vivo. Finally, our data suggest that regenerated HC-like cells likely possess functional transduction channels and are able to form connections with adult auditory neurons. Epige...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 22, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Declan Doogan of Juvenescence Presenting at Investing in the Age of Longevity
Investing in the Age of Longevity was an event held in London earlier this year as a part of the Longevity Week, a chance for Jim Mellon and the rest of the Juvenescence team to present their thesis on the longevity industry to the investor community - that this is an enormous opportunity to both greatly improve the human condition and generate returns on investment. A number of companies were there to present, as examples of the work on slowing and reversing aging presently taking place, and I was graciously invited to discuss the latest developments at Repair Biotechnologies. The presentations from the event have been po...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 16, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Healthy Life Extension Community Source Type: blogs

MELD and MELD-XI scores
Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score is a logarithmic function of creatinine, total bilirubin and International Hospitalized Ratio (INR): MELD = 9.57(logeCreatinine) + 3.78(logeBilirubin) + 11.21(logeINR) + 6.43. MELD score was originally developed to assess prognosis in patients undergoing transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts (TIPS) for cirrhosis liver [1]. Later MELD score has been used in cardiovascular conditions like patients undergoing left ventricular assist device (LVAD) placement to operative transfusion requirements, morbidity, and mortality [2]. An important limitation f...
Source: Cardiophile MD - December 15, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis Tags: Cardiology Source Type: blogs

Best Post of April 2019: Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy in patients without obvious immunosuppression
The next in our " Best of the Month " series comes from Friday, April 12, 2019:I recently received a case in consultation which turned out to be progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Reading the clinical history, it was not entirely clear what predisposed the patient to PML. It wasn't clear, that is, until my mentor (the illustrious BK DeMasters) referred me to a nine-year-old paper by Sarah Gheuens, Gerald Pierone, Patrick Peeters, and Igor J. Koralnik entitled Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy in individuals with minimal or occult immunosuppression (J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry20...
Source: neuropathology blog - August 12, 2019 Category: Radiology Tags: Best of the Month series infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, August 5th 2019
In conclusion, with study of the frailty syndrome still in its infancy, frailty analysis remains a major challenge. It is a challenge that needs to be overcome in order to shed light on the multiple mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of this syndrome. Although several mechanisms contribute to frailty, immune system alteration seems to play a central role: this syndrome is characterized by increased levels of pro-inflammatory markers and the resulting pro-inflammatory status can have negative effects on various organs. Future studies should aim to better clarify the immune system alteration in frailty, and seek to esta...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 4, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Cells with Stem Cell Properties Identified in the Adult Liver
In this study we utilise single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq) to interrogate the transcriptome of human foetal and adult liver at single-cell resolution. In recent years scRNA-seq has helped identify unreported cell types within populations previously defined as homogenous. Here, we report the transcriptional signature of distinct hepatic cell types in foetal and adult human liver, including a foetal hepatobiliary hybrid progenitor (HHyP) population. We identify a gene expression profile that can distinguish between foetal HHyPs, foetal hepatocytes, and mature BECs. We further identify HHyP-like cells maintained in uninj...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 31, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

IBD and Liver Disease Link Revealed by Explorsys, Now an IBM Company
Researchers at Cleveland Clinic have discovered a relationship between IBD and non-alcoholic liver disease, postulating that immune factors are involved in both the intestinal and liver lesions (see:Studies Reveal Heightened Liver Disease Rates in IBD Patients Immune-mediated factors may be involved). Below is an excerpt from the article but make note of the reference to the use of Explorsys, a research tool owned by IBM:...Cleveland Clinic researchers and their collaborators have found that patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) experience higher rates of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, nonalcoholic steatohepati...
Source: Lab Soft News - July 20, 2019 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Bruce Friedman Tags: Diagnostics Electronic Health Record (EHR) Healthcare Information Technology Healthcare Innovations Medical Research Predictive Analytics Preventive Medicine Public Health Source Type: blogs

A Troublesome Cup of Tea
A 45-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with nausea and vomiting. Her symptoms had started seven days earlier and steadily worsened. She reported generalized abdominal pain and distention and that her eyes appeared yellow.The patient had no past medical history, took no medications, and said she did not drink or use drugs. Her history showed that she had been drinking an herbal preparation every day for the past five months to ameliorate her heavy menstrual periods.The patient had mild right upper quadrant tenderness but no distention, rebound, or guarding. Her lungs were clear, and her heart rate and rhy...
Source: The Tox Cave - July 1, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Losing my first patient as a primary care physician
The first time I spoke to her was in the hospital when I was a relatively new intern caring for her. She was ailing for a while with complications of liver cirrhosis. She was new to the area. She had relocated from a different city to live close to her family. I eventually ended up […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 25, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/prarthna-bhardwaj" rel="tag" > Dr. Prarthna Bhardwaj < /a > < /span > Tags: Physician Primary Care Source Type: blogs

Autoimmune Disease: Start With Wheat & Grain Elimination
If you or someone close to you have an autoimmune condition such as rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis, along with about 195 others, there are a number of steps you can take that reduce, even eliminate the autoimmune inflammation damaging your organs. (Unfortunately, some forms of autoimmune damage cannot be reversed. Autoimmune loss of pancreatic beta cells that lead to type 1 diabetes, Hashimoto’s thyroiditis that damages the thyroid gland, or autoimmune hepatitis that can lead to cirrhosis. for example, cannot be reversed even if the autoimmune p...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - June 24, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Autoimmunity autoimmune casein Gliadin grain-free omega-3 undoctored vitamin D wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Baby boomers and hepatitis C: What ’s the connection?
Hepatitis C is a viral infection that is spread through contact with infected blood. Hepatitis C infection can be short-term (acute) or long-term (chronic). Most people with acute hepatitis C eventually develop chronic hepatitis C. Hepatitis C usually does not cause symptoms, which is why most people with hepatitis C don’t know that they are infected. Left untreated, hepatitis C can lead to cirrhosis, liver cancer, and liver failure. Why screen baby boomers for hepatitis C? Why are we recommending screening of adults in the baby boomer generation? To understand this, it’s worth reviewing how we got here. In 199...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - May 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Raymond Chung, MD Tags: Health Healthy Aging Infectious diseases Screening Source Type: blogs

Podcasts for medical students on internal medicine
Today, we received two 3rd year medical students starting their IM rotation. I told them I would give them a list of podcasts that should help them get oriented to internal medicine. This is my podcast v1.0 list: From the Curbsiders: 142 Cirrhosis TIPS for Acute Complications 104: Renal tubular acidosis with Kidney Boy, Joel Topf MD 92: Pulmonary Embolism for the Internist 86: COPD: Diagnosis, treatment, PFTs, and nihilism 76: Pneumonia Pearls with Dr Robert Centor 61: Vasculitis and Giant-Cell Arteritis: ‘Rheum’ for improvement 52: Anemia: Tips, and tools for diagnosis and treatment ...
Source: DB's Medical Rants - April 29, 2019 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: rcentor Tags: Medical Rants Source Type: blogs

What is Detoxing From Alcohol Like, and How We Can Help Make It Comfortable
Detoxing from Alcohol Detoxing from alcohol can look very different to many different people. The way you may feel when you detox from alcohol depends on the severity of your addiction and how long you have been addicted to alcohol for. If someone has had a few too many drinks at a celebration, chances are, they might feel hungover the next morning. They might experience nausea or a headache, but are able to feel back to normal later that day or the following day. However, for someone suffering from an alcohol addiction, the experience is much different. The body of someone suffering from alcohol addiction is chemically wi...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - April 17, 2019 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Addiction Addiction Recovery Alcohol Alcohol Rehab Information Alcoholism Detox Resources for Alcohol and Drugs/Opiates Drinking Substance Abuse alcohol abuse alcohol dependence alcohol dependency alcohol detox alcohol treatment Source Type: blogs

Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy in patients without obvious immunosuppression
I recently received a case in consultation which turned out to be progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Reading the clinical history, it was not entirely clear what predisposed the patient to PML. It wasn't clear, that is, until my mentor (the illustrious BK DeMasters) to a nine-year-old paper by Sarah Gheuens, Gerald Pierone, Patrick Peeters, and Igor J. Koralnik entitled Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy in individuals with minimal or occult immunosuppression (J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 2010;81:247-254). In this series, hepatic cirrhosis -- which was what my patient had -- was among the more commo...
Source: neuropathology blog - April 12, 2019 Category: Radiology Tags: infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Confusion after gastric bypass with Roux-en-Y
At at recent case conference, we discussed a woman who had had a gastric bypass 20 years previously, and now had confusion. To remind you of the details of a gastric bypass: First, a small stomach pouch, approximately one ounce or 30 milliliters in volume, is created by dividing the top of the stomach from the rest of the stomach. Next, the first portion of the small intestine is divided, and the bottom end of the divided small intestine is brought up and connected to the newly created small stomach pouch. The procedure is completed by connecting the top portion of the divided small intestine to the small intestine furt...
Source: DB's Medical Rants - April 1, 2019 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: rcentor Tags: Medical Rants Source Type: blogs

ConvertX Biliary Stent Features Quick In-Office Removal, Now FDA Cleared
BrightWater Medical, based in Temecula, California, won FDA clearance for its ConvertX biliary stent. The system is used to relief biliary duct of obstructions. Blocked biliary ducts can cause all sorts of havoc on patients, such as infections, biliary cirrhosis, and liver damage. A stent and a drain is often placed to alleviate the condition. The stent needs to be removed after some time, so a separate invasive procedure is required. The innovative thing about the ConvertX biliary stent is that, unlike traditional stents, it does not require a separate procedure under sedation to remove it. A simple in-office pr...
Source: Medgadget - March 25, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: GI Source Type: blogs

Does fat cause fatty liver?
There is widely-held misconception that dietary fat causes fatty liver or that nothing can be done to reverse it. Doctors often say that there is nothing you can do and that cirrhosis and liver failure may be in your future. This is all wrong. Fatty liver is caused by diet and can be easily and readily reversed by diet, along with strategies to improve insulin sensitivity, just as we do in the Wheat Belly and Undoctored lifestyles. The post Does fat cause fatty liver? appeared first on Dr. William Davis. (Source: Wheat Belly Blog)
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - March 21, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Fat intake Fatty liver nald nash non-alcoholic steatohepatitis undoctored wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Ten reasons to NEVER eat gluten-free processed foods
. It saddens me: As popular as the Wheat Belly books and lifestyle have been, there are still millions of people who say things like “Oh, that Wheat Belly thing is just about being gluten-free.” They couldn’t be more wrong and have clearly not read any of the books. Yes, you can be gluten-free and consume foods that naturally have no gluten, gliadin, wheat germ agglutinin, amylopectin A, phytates, and the rest of the toxic components contained in wheat and related grains. You can eat apples, bacon, eggs, and salmon that are naturally gluten-free. You can drink water or tea that is gluten-free. No problems...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - February 1, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates gluten gluten-free grain-free grains wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Medicine MCQ Test Series 1
This Medicine MCQ Test Series contains 20 questions which can be attempted over 40 seconds each. After submission, answers and discussion will be displayed. Medicine MCQ Test Series 1 Time limit: 0 Quiz-summary 0 of 20 questions completed Questions: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Information ...
Source: Cardiophile MD - January 27, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis Tags: Medicine MCQ - CVS Source Type: blogs

Treating portal vein thrombosis in patients with cirrhosis
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - January 26, 2019 Category: Internal Medicine Tags: cardiovascular gastroenterology hematology Source Type: blogs

Fatty liver disease: What it is and what to do about it
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a condition of extra fat buildup in the liver, is on the rise — it now affects roughly 20% to 40% of the US population. It usually doesn’t cause any symptoms, and is often first detected by accident when an imaging study (such as an abdominal ultrasound, CT scan, or MRI) is requested for another reason. A fatty liver may also be identified on an imaging test as a part of investigating abnormal liver blood tests. NAFLD is intimately related to conditions like diabetes and obesity. It’s also linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Understanding NAFLD...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - January 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Wynne Armand, MD Tags: Digestive Disorders Health Source Type: blogs

Hepatocellular carcinoma risk, cirrhosis and hepatitis C
High profile public health strategy needed Related items fromOnMedica Overweight teens more likely to have severe liver disease later Scotland reveals target of halving child obesity by 2030 JCVI recommends universal HPV vaccination Lower cancer risk in people with higher vitamin D levels Public drastically underestimates cannabis risks (Source: OnMedica Blogs)
Source: OnMedica Blogs - December 3, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: blogs

Primary care uniquely positions us to be our patients ’ best allies
My patient The day I met you was early in my second year of internal medicine residency. After much of my internship had been spent on arduous inpatient rotations, I was finally ready to lead my own team of young doctors and students on a high-acuity wards service. Yet, in my continuity clinic, I was still fresh, insecure, and naive. The day I met you, your abdomen was swollen, your eyes were yellow, you were drowsy and seemingly apathetic. Years of heavy alcohol use had sclerosed your liver, leading to hepatic disease in its final stages. You were my patient, I was your new primary care doctor — and I didn’t s...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 18, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/ashley-mcmullen" rel="tag" > Ashley McMullen, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Hospital-Based Medicine Source Type: blogs

Thrombocytopenia does not predict bleeding in cirrhosis
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - September 2, 2018 Category: Internal Medicine Tags: gastroenterology hematology Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, August 27th 2018
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 26, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Inhibition of CDK4 Reverses Measures of Aging in the Liver
Today, I'll point out an open access commentary in which the authors survey a number of lines of research into age-related dysfunction in the liver, all of which lead back to elevated levels of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4). Some of this work involves investigation of the mechanisms of fatty liver disease, more properly known as hepatic steatosis. This is most commonly caused by being overweight in this age of cheap calories, but, setting aside the morbidly obese, the condition nonetheless tends to emerge later rather than earlier in life. Other research programs look at more directly age-associated measures of liver fu...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 20, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Irreversible
Follow the Wheat Belly lifestyle and literally hundreds of diseases can be reversed: type 2 diabetes reverts to normal within weeks to months (depending on how much weight needs to be lost to restore insulin sensitivity), fatty liver reverses to normal within a few weeks, skin rashes recede, IBS and acid reflux are gone within days in the majority, high triglycerides plummet, even several forms of kidney disease can reverse. But there are health conditions that, once established, can leave effects that can be irreversible even if the initial causative condition reverses. For example, type 2 diabetes can cause kidney d...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - August 6, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates autoimmune Gliadin gluten gluten-free grain-free grains Inflammation undoctored wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Sorting out the health effects of alcohol
When it comes to your beverage of choice, alcoholic beverages are unique. For millions, they are a regular part of the dining experience. They’re often an important component of social events, celebrations, and milestones; we toast people, events, and memories with alcohol. They play a key role in many religious traditions. And, of course, the alcoholic beverage industry is a major economic force, responsible for more than $220 billion in sales annually in the US. And all of this is true despite the well-known and well-publicized risks of drinking too much alcohol. The negative effects of alcohol It should be a surpr...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - August 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Alcohol Health Source Type: blogs

Health benefits of coffee and a proposed warning label
Coffee is among the most popular beverages ever, enjoyed by millions of people worldwide each day. Estimates suggest that Americans consumed 3.4 billion pounds of coffee last year. When it comes to its health effects, coffee is also among the best studied beverages. How much is too much? Does coffee cause cancer? What is behind the proposed new warning label for coffee? Fortunately, the news on coffee is mostly good. This includes a recent study that found coffee drinkers live longer, a conclusion that held up even for heavy coffee consumption (eight or more cups of coffee each day), and regardless of whether the coffee wa...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - July 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Health Healthy Eating Source Type: blogs

The Drug Epidemic Nobody Talks About
U.S. death rate from alcohol-related liverdisease is soaring."Deaths from liver disease have increased sharply in recent years in the United States, according to a study published in the British Medical Journal. Cirrhosis-related deaths increased by 65 percent from 1999 to 2016, and deaths from liver cancer doubled, the study said. The rise in death rates was driven predominantly by alcohol-induced disease, the report said."Over the past decade, people ages 25 to 34 had the highest increase in cirrhosis deaths — an average of 10.5 percent per year — of the demographic groups examined, researchers repo...
Source: Addiction Inbox - July 19, 2018 Category: Addiction Authors: Dirk Hanson Source Type: blogs

6 Amazing Benefits of Intermittent Fasting
You're reading 6 Amazing Benefits of Intermittent Fasting, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. I started doing intermittent fasting five years ago after doctors told me to quit the gym for a year. I had injured my abs and back, and doctors advised me not to exercise, not even do cardio, till I`m fully recovered. Things went down from there since all I was doing, besides work, was eat anything I can get my hands on (I`m a foodie, or that`s how I used to think of myself.) I gained 50 pounds in no time, and I ha...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - July 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Marwan Jamal Tags: featured health and fitness self improvement best health advice fitness and health Intermittent Fasting Weight Loss Practices Source Type: blogs

Which of these patients should get a liver transplant?
People with liver failure and cirrhosis die every year because there are not enough livers available. Who should receive the treasured life-saving organ? There is an organ allocation system in place, which has evolved over time, which ranks patients who need liver transplants. Without such a system, there would be confusion and chaos. How can we fairly determine who should receive the next available liver? What criteria should move a candidate toward the head of the line? Age? Medical diagnoses? Insurance coverage? Employment status? Worth to society? Criminal record? Consider the following six hypothetical examples of pat...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 8, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/michael-kirsch" rel="tag" > Michael Kirsch, MD < /a > Tags: Conditions Gastroenterology Source Type: blogs

Tropical Travel Trouble 009 Humongous HIV Extravaganza
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog aka Tropical Travel Trouble 009 The diagnosis of HIV is no longer fatal and the term AIDS is becoming less frequent. In many countries, people with HIV are living longer than those with diabetes. This post will hopefully teach the basics of a complex disease and demystify some of the potential diseases you need to consider in those who are severely immunosuppressed. While trying to be comprehensive this post can not be exhaustive (as you can imagine any patient with ...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - July 7, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Amanda McConnell Tags: Clinical Cases Tropical Medicine AIDS art cryptococcoma cryptococcus HIV HIV1 HIV2 PEP PrEP TB toxoplasma tuberculoma Source Type: blogs

Michelle ’ s Wheat Belly health and weight transformation
  Michelle shared her Wheat Belly transformation in health and weight, something that none of her doctors helped accomplish. She accomplished all this  on her own–with spectacular results: thinner, no longer a diabetic, reversed fatty liver, rashes, and hormonal distortions. “Just wanted to share how unhealthy I was pre-Wheat Belly. I did not feel well and had diabetes, high liver enzymes, high cholesterol including high triglycerides, high ferritin levels, rashes and too many other things to mention. “I started Wheat Belly because my life depended on it. Don’t let your health get that fa...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - June 28, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates diabetes facial change Inflammation undoctored Weight Loss wheat belly Wheat Belly Total Health Source Type: blogs

Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 241
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Just when you thought your brain could unwind on a Friday, you realise that it would rather be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF…introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 241. Readers can subscribe to FFFF RSS or subscribe to the FFFF weekly EMAIL Question 1 Which family shares 4 Nobel prizes? A Nobel prize between wife and husband, followed by a second prize for the wife and a later prize to their daughter. Reveal Answer ...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - June 14, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neil Long Tags: Frivolous Friday Five battle of troy burkholderia mallei cannabis cirrhosis CPR greek soldiers irene joliot-curie kiss of life marie curie moroccan fishermen nobel prize peter safar pierre curie pseudomonas mallei Rene Laenne Source Type: blogs

MKSAP: 35-year-old woman is evaluated for intermittent fever
Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 35-year-old woman is evaluated for intermittent fever, sweats, fatigue, and dull midchest pain of 2 weeks’ duration. Medical history is significant for liver transplantation 6 months ago for primary biliary cirrhosis; she was seronegative for cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus, and her donor was positive for both. Results of pretransplant testing for tuberculosis were negative. She received valganciclovir prophylaxis for 3 months after transplantation. Medications are tacrolimus, prednisone, ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 12, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/mksap" rel="tag" > mksap < /a > Tags: Conditions Allergies & Immunology Infectious Disease Source Type: blogs

Insurance denials: the law of the land
It all started out with Malaysian methimazole, and didn’t end until two highly trained medical professionals sat on opposite ends of a telephone call, scratching their heads and wondering how two digits being transposed could lead to so many problems. Those two transposed digits caused a thyroid uptake scan to become a bone marrow scan (whatever that is). But look at all it took to get there. Mystery illness, mystery medicine It started when a new patient came to see one of my colleagues with a mystery illness, and a medication in a pill bottle with a label in another language. After figuring out what this medicine w...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 7, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/fred-n-pelzman" rel="tag" > Fred N. Pelzman, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Primary Care Source Type: blogs

Eponymythology: Atraumatic Abdominal Ecchymosis
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Overview We review the original descriptions of 5 eponymous signs (n=6) associated with non-traumatic abdominal ecchymosis. These commonly cited eponyms involving the abdominal wall and flanks (Grey Turner, Cullen and Stabler); scrotum (Bryant) and upper thigh (Fox) may be useful clues directing the examiner to consider potentially serious causes of abdominal pathology. Cullen sign Thomas Stephen Cullen (1869–1953) was a Canadian gynecologist Non-traumat...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - April 18, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mike Cadogan Tags: Eponymythology Abdominal Ecchymosis Bryant sign Cullen sign fox sign Francis Edward Stabler George Grey Turner Grey Turner sign John Adrian Fox John Henry Bryant Stabler sign Thomas Stephen Cullen Source Type: blogs

Better Understanding Why the Liver is a Highly Regenerative Organ
In adult mammals, the liver is the most regenerative organ, capable of significant regrowth following injury. Why is this the case? Researchers here point to a small subset of liver cells in mice that are distinguished by telomerase expression, and while mice and humans have quite different telomerase and telomere dynamics, indirect evidence suggests that a similar population may exist in our species. Significant telomerase expression is the characteristic of stem cells that allows for unlimited replication: telomerase acts lengthen telomeres, the caps at the ends of chromosomes that shorten with each cell division. When t...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 6, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

The cirrhosis chalk talk
Some days on ward rounds we have time for relatively short chalk talks.  Over the years I have developed many.  Learners seem to like this one in particular. We start with this question – name complications that cirrhotic patients develop for which we have secondary prevention.  Knowing this list and the associated drugs allows us to peruse the drug list to add to the PMH when it is not readily available. Here is my list: Esophageal varices – most patients with significant varices are taking a non-specific beta blocker.  More recently evidence suggests that carvedilol might be better than pr...
Source: DB's Medical Rants - April 2, 2018 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: rcentor Tags: Medical Rants Source Type: blogs

MKSAP: 57-year-old man with chronic hepatitis C infection
Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 57-year-old man is evaluated during a routine examination. His medical history is notable for chronic hepatitis C infection with cirrhosis, which was diagnosed 3 years ago. He undergoes surveillance ultrasound for hepatocellular carcinoma every 6 months. On physical examination, temperature is 36.8 °C (98.2 °F), blood pressure is 110/82 mm Hg, pulse rate is 65/min, and respiration rate is 18/min; BMI is 22. Muscle wasting and scleral icterus are noted. There is no flank dullness and no asterixi...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 31, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/mksap" rel="tag" > mksap < /a > Tags: Conditions Gastroenterology Oncology/Hematology Source Type: blogs

Uncontrollable itching – part II
As we heard the history we stopped, prior to hearing the exam and labs, and developed a differential diagnosis.  With the combination of itching, probable jaundice and pale stools we assume either intrahepatic or extrahepatic obstruction.  Our differential diagnosis with commentary:   Primary biliary cirrhosis – much more common in women then men – but does often present at this age with uncontrollable itching Primary sclerosing cholangitis – no history of ulcerative colitis or diarrhea symptoms, but still possible Gallstone – not all common duct stones cause pain Cholangiocarcinoma ...
Source: DB's Medical Rants - March 20, 2018 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: rcentor Tags: Medical Rants Source Type: blogs

“ I have a wheat intolerance ”
I hear this comment with some regularity when, for instance, someone recognizes me as the author of the Wheat Belly series. This is a step in the right direction. But saying that you have a wheat intolerance is like saying “I have a tobacco intolerance.” The impact of tobacco smoking on health ranges from mild impairment, to incapacitating diseases such as chronic lung disease and abdominal aortic aneurysms, to death. A rare person escapes the ravages of years of smoking, but most people develop at least one, if not half-a-dozen, health problems from cigarettes. And so it goes with wheat: It’s a rare pers...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - March 17, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle gluten gluten-free grain grain-free grains health Inflammation Source Type: blogs