Trial By Error: What ’ s Up With Cochrane ’ s Exercise Review?
By David Tuller, DrPH On June 17th, Cochrane announced that it had received a revision of a much-contested review of exercise therapy for treatment of chronic fatigue syndrome (as the organization has long called the illness or cluster of illnesses also referred to as myalgic encephalomyelitis, CFS/ME, and ME/CFS). In a posted statement, Cochrane noted […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - September 24, 2019 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: My Letter to Professor Chalder about the PRINCE Trial
By David Tuller, DrPH In its efforts to save money, the National Health Service has been expanding the program known as Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) by encouraging physicians to refer over all those with so-called “medically unexplained symptoms” (MUS). Under IAPT, the illness referred to as “chronic fatigue syndrome” falls into the MUS […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - September 16, 2019 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: An Ill-Informed Article in The Guardian
By David Tuller, DrPH People who know little or nothing about the illness or cluster of illnesses variously called myalgic encephalomyelitis, chronic fatigue syndrome, CFS/ME, and ME/CFS can’t seem to stop writing stupid and ill-informed stories about it. And Professor Michael Sharpe seems to blame “Americans”–rather than his own disastrous research–for his current problems and […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - August 13, 2019 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: More GET Drivel from Australia
By David Tuller, DrPH Some Australian members of the GET/CBT ideological brigades have published yet more nonsense and drivel about “graded exercise therapy” as a treatment for ME/CFS, or what they are still calling “chronic fatigue syndrome.” The article, simply called “Chronic fatigue syndrome: graded exercise therapy,” is in a peer-reviewed journal from a reputable […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - July 30, 2019 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Gut Pathogens celebrates its 10th anniversary
Gut Pathogens was founded in 2009 as a journal focusing on enteric infections and aimed at an audience in the Global South and middle income countries. The focus of the first articles remained directed at virulence, epidemiology and genomics of classical pathogens. However, soon after the developments in the field of probiotics turned the journal into a preferred venue for research on this topic. Furthermore, parallel developments in genomics of bacteria resulted in an increase of short articles documenting bacterial genomics, and this led us to create a new short article type called Genome Announcements. Soon after, the s...
Source: BioMed Central Blog - June 26, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: Niyaz Ahmed Tags: Biology Developing World Health Medicine bacterial genomics enteric infections gastroenterology gut gut pathogens gut-brain axis microbiome Source Type: blogs

Podcast: There ’s More to Trauma than PTSD
 Most of us are familiar with post-traumatic stress disorder. PTSD (deservedly) gets a lot of attention, largely focused on soldiers returning from service. But trauma comes in many forms, and most people have experienced it in one form or another. In this episode, learn about the differences between PTSD and other forms of trauma, how to identify it, and what can be done about it.   Subscribe to Our Show! And Remember to Review Us! About Our Guest Robert T. Muller, Ph.D., is the author of the psychotherapy book, “Trauma & the Struggle to Open Up:  From Avoidance to Recovery &...
Source: World of Psychology - April 18, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Show Tags: General PTSD The Psych Central Show Trauma Gabe Howard Vincent M. Wales Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: My Latest Letter to Bristol
By David Tuller, DrPH Last month I wrote to the director of legal services at the University of Bristol seeking information about documents from a study conducted by investigators from the institution. The study, published by BMJ Open in 2011, was called “Unidentified Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) is a major cause of school absence: […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - April 9, 2019 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

The dilemmas faced by the chronically ill as they age   
I ’ve been concerned lately. Here’s why. In 2001, I got sick with what the doctors assumed was an acute viral infection, but I never recovered. I’m mostly housebound, often bedbound. My diagnosis is the little understood (but much misunderstood) myalgic encephalomyelitis, also known as chronic f atigue syndrome or ME/CFS. I describe it as “the flu […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 13, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/toni-bernhard" rel="tag" > Toni Bernhard, JD < /a > < /span > Tags: Patient Patients Rheumatology Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: Re-visiting My Questions for PACE Professors
By David Tuller, DrPH I thought it might be helpful to re-post a list of questions I wanted to ask Professor White and his PACE colleagues in September, 2015–more than a month before Virology Blog posted the first installment of “Trial By Error: The Troubling Case of the PACE Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Study.” I originally […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - February 13, 2019 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: The New Interferon “ CFS ” Study
By David Tuller, DrPH I haven’t had time to cover the new and wildly over-hyped study about prolonged fatigue–and purportedly about “chronic fatigue syndrome”–that was published this week in the journal Psychoneuroendocrinology. Thanks no doubt to the involvement of the Science Media Centre, this mildly interesting piece of research has received widespread media attention. Since […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - December 20, 2018 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: Some Good News on Cochrane
By David Tuller, DrPH In what can only be characterized as a welcome surprise, Cochrane has rejected the revision of a 2014 review of exercise treatments for chronic fatigue syndrome, stating that the work does not meet the organization’s “quality standards.” Cochrane revealed the decision late Friday in a statement appended to the review, which […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - December 3, 2018 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: Some Thoughts About NICE
By David Tuller, DrPH The UK’s National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), which develops clinical guidelines for a range of medical conditions, is currently selecting a committee to develop a new guidance for the illness it refers to as myalgic encephaloymyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS). The new guidance will replace one written in 2007, […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - November 19, 2018 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: How to Avoid Ethical Review
By David Tuller, DrPH I have written many posts about BMJ Open’s 2011 school absence study,   which reported that school absence records could be useful in identifying children with chronic fatigue syndrome. However, for reasons not yet adequately explained, the investigators exempted the study from ethical review on the grounds that it qualified as […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - November 13, 2018 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: How Bristol Investigators Avoided Ethical Review
By David Tuller, DrPH I have written many posts about BMJ Open’s 2011 school absence study, which reported that school absence records could be useful in identifying children with chronic fatigue syndrome. However, for reasons not yet adequately explained, the investigators exempted the study from ethical review on the grounds that it qualified as “service […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - November 13, 2018 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: David Tuller ME/CFS Source Type: blogs

The Wheat Belly Timeline: The First Few Weeks
With all our talk of opiate withdrawal syndromes accompanied by nausea, headache, fatigue, and depression, it can be daunting, even terrifying, to people who face the prospect of tossing all wheat and grains into the trash bin, vowing to never let a Danish, donut, or dish of pasta cross your lips again. So it may help to lay out a timeline of what and when various changes can develop in the Wheat Belly wheat- and grain-free lifestyle. You can expect different symptoms and health conditions to recede at different rates, since they are caused by a variety of different mechanisms. For instance, the direct gastrointestinal tox...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - October 26, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle acid reflux detoxification grains IBS Inflammation joint pain opiates withdrawal Source Type: blogs

ME/CFS is not a psychosomatic illness
W. Ian Lipkin, Director of the Center for Infection and Immunity and the Center for Solutions for ME/CFS at Columbia University, has written the following letter several days before the Fourth Annual Conference on Psychosomatics at Columbia University this weekend. The original letter can be found at this link. 18 October 2018 Dear Colleagues and Friends, The […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - October 18, 2018 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: ME/CFS chronic fatigue syndrome columbia university conference psychosomatic w ian lipkin Source Type: blogs

TWiV Special: David Tuller is PACEman
David Tuller returns to provide an update of his investigative work to expose the methodological and ethical problems with the PACE trial for ME/CFS. &lt;span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”&gt;&lt;/span&gt;&amp;lt;span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”&amp;gt;&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;amp;lt;span data-m...
Source: virology blog - August 20, 2018 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: This Week in Virology CBT/GET chronic fatigue syndrome clinical trial david tuller ME/CFS myalgic encephalomyelitis PACE trial viral virus viruses Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: More Mayo, Please …
By David Tuller, DrPH Two years ago, the Mayo Clinic referred Lisa Alioto, a patient diagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome, to a three-day rehabilitation program–a mini-version of a multi-week program designed for those with a grab-bag of chronic pain and related conditions. These conditions, as listed on the Mayo website, include fibromyalgia, chronic back pain, […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - August 20, 2018 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

People with Bipolar Disorder Share How They Started Treatment —and Why They Stick with It
Bipolar disorder is highly treatable, and yet so many people don’t seek treatment. Or if they do seek help, they later stop taking their meds or stop attending their therapy sessions. Or both. And then their bipolar blows up. Their mania spikes. Their depression sinks even deeper. Sticking to treatment is not easy. Medication has side effects. Therapy takes work. The illness itself can be stubborn, exhausting, confusing. It can all feel so frustrating. We wanted to know what led some individuals to stick to their initial treatment — and why they’ve stayed dedicated ever since. Of course, life is not linea...
Source: World of Psychology - August 14, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Bipolar Disorders General Inspiration & Hope Mental Health and Wellness Treatment Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: Mayo Still Champions GET
By David Tuller, DrPH Last week I admonished the US Centers for Disease Control for including fuzzy language about exercise in its new package of “information for healthcare providers.” The way the Mayo Clinic deals with the illness it calls chronic fatigue syndrome is an excellent illustration of why it is so important for the […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - August 6, 2018 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: Australia ’ s Online GET/CBT Education Program
By David Tuller, DrPH Last year, BMJ Open published a paper called “Randomised controlled trial of online continuing education for health professionals to improve the management of chronic fatigue syndrome: a study protocol.” The seven authors, all affiliated with the University of New South Wales in Sydney, included Professor Andrew Lloyd, the infectious disease expert […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - May 14, 2018 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

A tired child? What you should know
Follow me on Twitter @drClaire Children often complain of being tired. Usually it’s for simple reasons — because it’s the end of a busy day, or because they stayed up late the night before, or because they are trying to get out of doing something they don’t want to do. When kids are sick they are usually tired, and need more rest to get better. But when a child complains all the time, and fatigue starts to get in the way of things they usually enjoy, it could be a sign of a problem. Here are some possible reasons for chronic fatigue in children: Sleep problems. This makes sense, obviously, since if...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - April 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Claire McCarthy, MD Tags: Children's Health Fatigue Parenting Source Type: blogs

Your Nursing Career's Differential Diagnosis
In medicine, nursing, and healthcare, a differential diagnosis refers to the process of differentiating between two or more conditions sharing similar signs and symptoms. In the context of your nursing career, this process can be equally elucidating. Is there a careful career examination in your future? If so, what would your differential diagnosis be?Photo by rawpixel.com on UnsplashIt All Begins With AssessmentWhether you're examining a patient or dissecting the state of your own nursing career, you always begin with an assessment. The gathering of data is the first step in the nursing process, of course, ...
Source: Digital Doorway - April 16, 2018 Category: Nursing Tags: career career development careers healthcare careers nurse nurse career nurse careers nurses nursing nursing careers Source Type: blogs

In children and teens, depression doesn ’t always look like sadness
Follow me on Twitter @drClaire When we think of a depressed person, we tend to think of someone who, well, acts sad. The picture we have in our head is of someone who doesn’t want to get off the couch or out of bed, who is eating much less or much more than usual, has trouble sleeping or wants to sleep all the time, who has trouble with usual daily activities, and doesn’t talk much. Children and teens with depression can certainly look like that. But depression can play out in different ways, too. Numbers are hard to come by in younger children, but among 12-to-17-year-olds, almost 13% have had a major depressi...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - March 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Claire McCarthy, MD Tags: Anxiety and Depression Children's Health Mental Health Parenting Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: The Dutch Review; My Trip; Bristol ’ s Silence
By David Tuller, DrPH And now some potentially good news from the Netherlands. Two years ago, the Dutch parliament asked the Health Council—an independent scientific advisory body—to review the state of evidence related to the illness generally called chronic fatigue syndrome in the Netherlands. That review was to include the evidence for rehabilitative treatments like […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - March 12, 2018 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Dr. Google: The top 10 health searches in 2017
Follow me on Twitter @RobShmerling Ever wonder what other people are wondering about? I know I do. So, here are the top 10 health searches in Google for 2017. And just so you don’t have to look each one up, I’ve provided a brief answer. You’re welcome. 1.  What causes hiccups? I was surprised this one made it to the top 10 list of health searches. Maybe this search is common because hiccups are as mysterious as they are universal. I’ve written about hiccups before, but let’s just say the cause in any individual person is rarely known or knowable. Then again, the reason hiccups stop is als...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - February 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Health Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: Letter to British Journal of Sports Medicine from CPET Experts
By David Tuller, DrPH Last October, the British Journal of Sports Medicine published a short paper that was essentially a summary of Cochrane’s systematic review of graded exercise for chronic fatigue syndrome (as Cochrane calls the illness). This systematic review is problematic for a number of reasons—not least of which is that it includes the […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - February 5, 2018 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Her Chronic Pain Was a Medical Mystery. Was It an Unexplained Condition? - The Daily Beast
Leslie Levine's searing pains started the day after Thanksgiving in 2006. They began in her toes, which turned strangely dark. Then the agony crept upward."It felt like my legs were being dipped in boiling oil 24/7," she said.The emergency room and a series of doctors could do little but scratch their heads and offer her painkillers."I was living on oxycodone and very grateful for it," Levine said, then Harvard University's chief patent attorney. But it wasn't enough."By January, I was on disability, because I was in such pain and could hardly walk."Her internet search for answers ...
Source: Psychology of Pain - December 7, 2017 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: My Brief Encounter with Professor Crawley
By David Tuller, DrPH At noon last Friday, at the University of Exeter’s Mood Disorders Centre, Professor Esther Crawley gave a talk called “What is new in paediatric CFS/ME research.” When I saw a notice about the event the day before, I felt it might be my one chance to ask her directly about her concerns regarding my work and her accusation that I was writing “libellous blogs.” (If she were American, she would presumably have accused me of writing “libelous–one L–blogs”). I also hoped to gain insight into some other issues that have troubled me: why she still believ...
Source: virology blog - November 20, 2017 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: What ’ s Going On, BMJ Best Practice?
By David Tuller, DrPH Something’s weird over at BMJ Best Practice, a resource for clinical decision-making and an arm of the BMJ Publishing Group. Two days ago, Steven Lubet and I posted a blog praising the new guide written by Dr. James Baraniuk and apparently reviewed by Peter White, along with two other experts. First, I want to acknowledge that many patients disagreed with us about the merits of the guide. We assessed this document based on how much better it was than previous terrible U.K. guidelines, like those from NICE–not based on how far it was from perfection. It was our understanding as well that t...
Source: virology blog - November 15, 2017 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: The Surprising New BMJ Best Practice Guide
This report puts the National Institute for Health and Care Exellence (NICE) to shame. NICE develops clinical guidelines that are widely followed in the U.K, and in other countries as well. A NICE surveillance team had the opportunity to review the same recent literature available to Dr. Baraniuk and recommended in June that the agency should make no changes to its 2007 guidance—which of course highlights CBT and GET as effective treatments. In September, after patient organizations expressed overwhelming opposition to this recommendation, NICE rejected it and announced that the 2007 guidance would instead undergo a ...
Source: virology blog - November 13, 2017 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: Another Letter to NICE ’ s Sir Andrew Dillon
By David Tuller, DrPH First, for those who might have missed it, here’s a conversation from This Week in Virology (TWiV), posted a few days ago. Dr. Racaniello and I discuss the CDC, NICE, Esther Crawley’s ethically challenged behavior, the CMRC, and other stuff. Second, earlier today, I sent the following e-mail to Sir Andrew Dillon, the NICE chief executive: Dear Sir Andrew: I would like to congratulate NICE on its decision to pursue a full update of CG53, the CFS/ME guidance, rather than accept the surveillance report’s recommendation to leave it as is. The Guidance Executive made the right call, bas...
Source: virology blog - October 17, 2017 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Leaky gut: What is it, and what does it mean for you?
Before the medical community had better understanding of the mechanisms that cause disease, doctors believed certain ailments could originate from imbalances in the stomach. This was called hypochondriasis. (In Ancient Greek, hypochondrium refers to the upper part of the abdomen, the region between the breastbone and the navel.) This concept was rejected as science evolved and, for example, we could look under a microscope and see bacteria, parasites, and viruses. The meaning of the term changed, and for many years doctors used the word “hypochondriac” to describe a person who has a persistent, often inexplicab...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - September 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Marcelo Campos, MD Tags: Digestive Disorders Health Source Type: blogs

Study shows how online mindfulness interventions can reduce work-related rumination and fatigue, and improve sleep quality
This study aimed to extend our theoretical understanding of how mindfulness-based interventions exert their positive influence on measures of occupational health. Employing a randomized waitlist control study design, we sought to (a) assess an Internet-based instructor-led mindfulness intervention for its effect on key factors associated with “recovery from work,” specifically, work-related rumination, fatigue, and sleep quality; (b) assess different facets of mindfulness (acting with awareness, describing, nonjudging, and nonreacting) as mechanisms of change; and (c) assess whether the effect of the interventi...
Source: SharpBrains - September 14, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Greater Good Magazine Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness Technology cognitive-functioning depression fatigue Internet-based mental energy Mental Health Foundation Mental-Health mindfulness occupational health psychological well-being rumination Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: The NICE “ Topic Expert ” Reports
By David Tuller, DrPH My first recent freedom of information request to the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) was for information about the experts consulted in the current process of reviewing CG53, the 2007 guidance for the illness the agency calls chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis. In its response, the agency explained that seven topic experts had been consulted in the process of preparing the surveillance document, which recommended leaving the guidance as is. (I have previously written about the NICE review process on CG53 here, here and here. My e-mail exchange with Sir Andrew...
Source: virology blog - September 11, 2017 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: Seeking More Details on Crawley School Absence Study
In this study, schools identified students with unexplained absences and invited them and their families to meet with Professor Crawley to discuss the matter. The study authors did not seek ethical review for this study on the grounds that it only involved “service evaluation,” even though it was piloting a new method of identifying previously undiagnosed patients for Professor Crawley’s CFS/ME clinical service. Under the circumstances, we were interested in reviewing the letters sent to the families, as well as any other information they were provided about the study. We did not send the request directly...
Source: virology blog - August 30, 2017 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: No Ethical Review of Crawley School Absence Study
By David Tuller, DrPH This is a complicated post. Here are the key points. The rest is details: *Professor Esther Crawley and co-authors claimed a 2011 study in BMJ Open was exempt from ethical review because it involved the routine collection of data for “service evaluation.” Yet the 2011 study was not an evaluation of routine clinical service provision–it was designed to road-test a new methodology to identify undiagnosed CFS/ME patients among students with records of chronic absence. *To support the claim that the study was exempt from ethical review, Professor Crawley and co-authors cited a 2007 resea...
Source: virology blog - August 28, 2017 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: ME/CFS Source Type: blogs

Women are flocking to wellness because modern medicine still doesn ’t take them seriously - Quartz
The wellness movement is having a moment. The more luxurious aspects of it were on full display last weekend at the inaugural summitof Gwyneth Paltrow's lifestyle brand Goop, from crystal therapy to $66 jade eggs meant to be worn in the vagina. Meanwhile, juice cleanses,"clean eating," and hand-carved lamps made of pink Himalayan salthave all gone decidedly mainstream. I myself will cop to having participated in a sound bath —basically meditating for 90 minutes in a dark room while listening to gongs and singing bowls. (I felt amazingly weird afterward, in the best possible way.)It seems that privileged...
Source: Psychology of Pain - August 21, 2017 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

Trial by Error: Retired PACE Investigator Peter White and Swiss Re
By David Tuller, DrPH On November 17, 2015, a few weeks after publication of my 15,000-word investigation of the PACE trial, I posted a blog about a talk Peter White gave to Swiss Re employees on the findings from his bogus study. Professor White, of course, was the lead PACE investigator and also served–and apparently still serves–as “chief medical officer” for the insurance company. Swiss Re has released information about its 2017 “insurance medicine summit,” to be held this coming November. Not surprisingly, Professor White is on the schedule. Although he has retired from his academi...
Source: virology blog - August 7, 2017 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Trial by Error: The Science Media Centre ’ s Desperate Efforts to Defend PACE
By David Tuller, DrPH This week, the Journal of Health Psychology published a special issue containing a raft of commentaries on the PACE trial. Most of them slammed the study for its many, many unacceptable flaws. Not surprisingly, Sir Simon Wessely’s lackeys at the Science Media Centre immediately posted three comments from “experts” lauding the trial and criticizing the JHP commentaries. I thought it might be helpful to deconstruct these rather pathetic efforts at defending the indefensible. I’ve posted all three statements below, followed by my comments. I decided to keep them relatively brief,...
Source: virology blog - August 2, 2017 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Trial by Error: NICE Declines to Disclose Names of Experts
By David Tuller, DrPH The Countess of Mar has received a negative response to her request for the names of the experts involved in the review of the NICE guideline for CFS/ME. The ME Association has not yet received a response related to the same question, nor have I. But the response to the countess indicates that the process is proceeding with a lack of full transparency. Here’s the response from the Department of Health: “The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) routinely consults a range of topic experts as part of its surveillance review process. NICE is currently consulting on a revie...
Source: virology blog - July 24, 2017 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Trial by Error: The NICE guidelines, and more on the CDC
This study exemplifies some of the problems common in this field of research, as I described on Virology Blog months ago. (Professor Esther Crawley of Bristol University, the trial’s lead investigator, subsequently referred to that blog post as “libelous” in a slide she showed during at least two speeches. She has not documented her charge.) The consultation document also notes that only study abstracts, not the studies themselves, were reviewed. This is a surprising methodological choice given the significance of the issue. Abstracts can be seriously misleading and incomplete; studies themselves obviousl...
Source: virology blog - July 17, 2017 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Trial by Error, Guest Post: Questions About Professor Sharpe ’ s ‘ Special Ethics Seminar ’
by Steven Lubet On 1 June 2017, Professor Michael Sharpe presented the “Special Ethics Seminar” at Oxford University’s St Cross College. In his posted abstract, he asserted that “some areas of scholarship are politicised (U.K. spelling in original),” including “the role of psychiatric or psychological approaches in the treatment” of ME/CFS patients. Sharpe also likened ME/CFS patients to climate change deniers, claiming: The use of such co-ordinated pressure group action against science was prominently seen in the field of climate change research but is now emerging in other a...
Source: virology blog - July 3, 2017 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Trial by Error, Continued: More on Graded Exercise from Peter White and The Lancet
By David Tuller, DrPH Professor Peter White and colleagues have published yet another study in The Lancet promoting graded exercise as an appropriate intervention for the illness they refer to as “chronic fatigue syndrome” but that is more appropriately called “myalgic encephalomyelitis.” (Two compromise terms, ME/CFS and CFS/ME, satisfy no one.) This new article exhibits the range of problems found repeatedly in this body of research, including the reliance on subjective outcomes for an open-label trial, unusual outcome-switching, and self-serving presentations of data. In short, this latest study...
Source: virology blog - June 29, 2017 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Commentary Source Type: blogs

Pacing, pacing, pacing – good, bad, or … ?
There’s nothing that pain peeps seem to like more than a good dispute over whether something is good, or not so good for treatment. Pacing is a perennial topic for this kind of vexed discussion. Advocates say “But look at what it does for me! I can do more without getting my pain out of control!” Those not quite as convinced say “But look at how little you’re doing, and you keep letting pain get in the way of what you really want to do!” Defining and measuring pacing is just as vexed as deciding whether it’s a good thing or not. Pacing isn’t well-defined and there are several...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - June 18, 2017 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: adiemusfree Tags: 'Pacing' or Quota Assessment Chronic pain Clinical reasoning Coping Skills Pain conditions Research Science in practice biopsychosocial pain management self management Therapeutic approaches Source Type: blogs

Trial by Error, Continued: My Letter to the University of Bristol
By David Tuller, DrPH This morning I e-mailed the following letter to Sue Paterson, the University of Bristol’s Director of Legal Services and Deputy University Secretary, to protest Professor Esther Crawley’s accusation that I libeled her in blogging about her work. I cc’d the office of the university’s vice-chancellor, Professor Hugh Brady. ********** Dear Ms. Paterson: I have recently learned that Professor Esther Crawley of the University of Bristol’s Centre for Child and Adolescent Health, in her inaugural lecture on February 24th of this year, accused me of libel. During her talk, she sh...
Source: virology blog - June 14, 2017 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Mother and Daughter Dynamic Duo: Fighting For Women ’s Health Equality
This essay was first published on MsMagazine.com. For decades, my mom and I have been a dynamic duo using the arts to creatively fight for women’s rights. And now we are using the arts to fight for my life. In the ’60-70s, during the burgeoning “Women’s Liberation Movement,” my mother, Bobbi Ausubel, co-wrote America’s first feminist play, How to Make a Woman. After each performance, cutting edge and ruckus consciousness raising groups helped women and men grapple with just how much gender roles dictated their lives. As a little girl, I couldn’t&n...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - June 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error, Continued: Julie Rehmeyer ’ s Journey “ Through the Shadowlands ”
By David Tuller, DrPH In February, 2011, I wrote a bad article about the PACE trial. At that time, I was reporting on the XMRV situation and had never heard about this piece of crap. As happens at news organizations, my editor at The New York Times sent me the Lancet paper and asked me to write it up for publication later that day. I did the best I could. Not knowing any of the background, I took the study at face value and reported the bogus findings—that cognitive behavior therapy and graded exercise therapy appeared to be effective treatments. I did include a few caveats—that the authors had links to disabil...
Source: virology blog - June 7, 2017 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error, Continued: My “ Tear It Up ” Talk at Invest in ME
By David Tuller, DrPH First, since I’m in London at the moment, I need to say that it feels weird and even wrong to be posting about PACE-related issues right after Saturday night’s terrible events. But in our f**ked-up world, life goes on for everyone else, including ME/CFS patients, and my job is to report this stuff, and so that’s what I’m going to do. On Thursday, wearing a beautiful and beautifully ironed shirt, I gave a talk at the dinner before this year’s annual Invest in ME conference, at a hotel right next to the Tower of London. About 100 or so scientists, advocates, patients, careg...
Source: virology blog - June 4, 2017 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Commentary Source Type: blogs