Wheat Belly Spicy Hummus
  Janet made the Spicy Hummus from the recipe on page 33 of the Wheat Belly 30- Minute Cookbook (reproduced below) and provided the wonderful photo above. Janet says “Spicy hummus and cut up red pepper, leftover from Super Bowl, a quick and easy snack while working from home.”   Spicy Hummus Hummus is such a versatile dip and sandwich spread that I thought it would be best to provide a homemade, do-it-yourself version. It’s also less costly making it yourself, rather than purchasing the deli version, which can get pretty pricey. If you don’t like the taste of tahini, you can substitute toa...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - February 11, 2021 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Open prebiotic recipe undoctored wheat belly Source Type: blogs

3 easy ways to eat a healthier diet
While many people might be taking a pass on formal New Year’s resolutions this year, others may mark a fresh start this month by resolving to make up for poor eating habits of the past. But this motivation is often focused on a diet that’s too ambitious, or too restrictive. Without a solid plan, you may fail quickly. So consider a compromise: start with these three easy ways to eat a healthier diet. Aim for real food only Look at your plate and note what’s processed and what isn’t. Maybe it’s the whole thing (like a frozen dinner), or maybe it’s just part of your meal (like the bottled dressing on your salad). ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - January 4, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Heidi Godman Tags: Diet and Weight Loss Health Healthy Eating Source Type: blogs

How to stock a plant-based pantry (and fridge) on a budget
Given the current pandemic and related economic stressors, many of us are trying to maintain healthy habits while watching our expenses. One of the areas where we can support our immune system is through our food choices. We all have to eat, and eat several times a day, and selecting foods that support our health and our planet — while also saving money — is now a priority for many. People are going meatless for many reasons About a quarter of the US is now vegetarian, especially people ages 25 to 34. A survey from 2017 studied US attitudes toward animal farming, and found that 54% of Americans were trying to purchase ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - June 12, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Uma Naidoo, MD Tags: Cooking and recipes Food as medicine Healthy Eating Heart Health Nutrition Source Type: blogs

The scoop on protein powder
Eating enough protein is not just for athletes or would-be Schwarzenegger types. It is necessary for a healthy immune system and required for organs like your heart, brain, and skin to function properly. The nutrient is also touted for its ability to help control appetite and enhance muscle growth. How much protein you need typically depends on your exercise routine, age, and health. And whether to supplement protein intake with a protein powder has become a common query. A closer look at protein powder To make such supplements, protein is extracted from animal or plant-based sources, which range from cow’s milk and eggs...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - March 9, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Emily Gelsomin, MLA, RD, LDN Tags: Diet and Weight Loss Drugs and Supplements Healthy Eating Source Type: blogs

When it comes to cholesterol levels, white meat may be no better than red meat — and plant-based protein beats both
This study looked at plant-based protein sources, and plant-based diets can provide all the necessary protein for optimal health. Here’s a look at the amount of protein contained in a variety of plant-based foods. Protein content in plant-based foods Food Serving size Protein (grams) Calories Lentils 1/2 cup 9 115 Black beans 1/2 cup 8 114 Chickpeas 1/2 cup 7 135 Kidney beans 1/2 cup 8 113 Black eyed peas 1/2 cup 7 112 Pinto beans 1/2 cup 7 117 Soybeans 1/2 cup 14 150 Tofu 1/2 cup 10 183 Nuts 1/2 cup 5–7 160–200 Peanut butter 2 tablespoons 8 190 Flaxseeds 3 tablespoons 5 150 Sesame seeds...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - August 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Katherine D. McManus, MS, RD, LDN Tags: Health Healthy Eating Heart Health Source Type: blogs

Ottolenghi Hummus
This hummus recipe from Yoman Ottolenghi and Sami Tamini’s Jerusalem cookbook is hands down the best, creamiest hummus I’ve ever made or eaten. The recipe uses dried chickpeas – which require an overnight soak – so you’ll need to plan ahead, probably the only downside to this amazing recipe. Lest you try to shortcut it, know that I’ve made this recipe with both canned and cooked chickpeas, and can attest that starting with dried chickpeas makes a superior hummus. It’s a lighter color and flavor, much softer and just plain better. You can tweak the recipe to your taste by ma...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - August 8, 2019 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Uncategorized Chickpeas hummus Source Type: blogs

A practical guide to the Mediterranean diet
The Mediterranean diet has received much attention as a healthy way to eat, and with good reason. The Mediterranean diet has been shown to reduce risk of heart disease, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, certain cancers, depression, and in older adults, a decreased risk of frailty, along with better mental and physical function. In January, US News and World Report named it the “best diet overall” for the second year running. What is the Mediterranean diet? The traditional Mediterranean diet is based on foods available in countries that border the Mediterranean Sea. The foundation for this healthy diet includes an abundanc...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - March 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Katherine D. McManus, MS, RD, LDN Tags: Health Healthy Eating Source Type: blogs

Matera, the 2019 European capital of culture
The weekend of November 1st was a long holiday weekend, so Stefano and I, and his aunt and uncle (yes, the uncle with MM), decided to visit the ancient southern Italian city of Matera, designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1993. It is also one of the OLDEST CONTINUOUSLY INHABITED cities in the entire world. How about that, eh! In 2014, Matera was also awarded the title of 2019 European city of culture and since then has become a big tourist attraction. By the time we managed to book a B&B, in fact, Matera was 97% booked! Matera is mainly famous for its Sassi (Italian for “Stones”), for its 1500 cave...
Source: Margaret's Corner - November 12, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll Matera Source Type: blogs

Love those legumes!
“Legumes” sounds like such a fancy word.  Let’s clarify that we’re talking about beans, folks. Beans, lentils, peas, chickpeas, it’s all good… and good for you.  Legumes are amazingly nutritious, high in protein and fiber, low in fat, and low in glycemic load. Legumes for heart health Scientific studies have definitively linked a diet high in legumes with a lower risk of developing obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, heart disease, or strokes. As a matter of fact, eating legumes every day can effectively treat these diseases in people who already have them. In one randomized controlled c...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - October 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Monique Tello, MD, MPH Tags: Food as medicine Healthy Eating Source Type: blogs

Unexpected Lessons Learned From the Wheat Belly Lifestyle
In the seven years since the original Wheat Belly book hit bookstores and turned the nutritional world topsy-turvy and millions of people have engaged in a grain-free lifestyle, many unique lessons have been learned. Even though I had engaged the practices of this lifestyle for a number of years and in thousands of people before I broadcast these ideas through books, expanding the audience to many more people yielded feedback on an enormous scale, new lessons that even surprised me. Among the new lessons learned along the way: Plantar fasciitis—I did not expect to have so many people report that this painful condition t...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - October 17, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates bowel flora gluten gluten-free grain-free grains Inflammation Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

Healthy lifestyle can prevent diabetes (and even reverse it)
The rate of type 2 diabetes is increasing around the world. Type 2 diabetes is a major cause of vision loss and blindness, kidney failure requiring dialysis, heart attacks, strokes, amputations, infections and even early death. Over 80% of people with prediabetes (that is, high blood sugars with the high risk for developing full-blown diabetes) don’t know it. Heck, one in four people who have full-blown diabetes don’t know they have it! Research suggests that a healthy lifestyle can prevent diabetes from occurring in the first place and even reverse its progress. Can a healthy diet and lifestyle prevent diabetes? The D...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - September 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Monique Tello, MD, MPH Tags: Diabetes Diet and Weight Loss Food as medicine Healthy Eating Prevention Source Type: blogs

Constipated Society
Our ancestors who lived without grains, sugars, and soft drinks enjoy predictable bowel behavior. They ate some turtle, fish, clams, mushrooms, coconut, or mongongo nuts for breakfast, and out it all came that afternoon or evening—large, steamy, filled with undigested remains and prolific quantities of bacteria, no straining, laxatives, or stack of magazines required. If instead you are living a modern life and have pancakes with maple syrup for breakfast and you’ll be lucky to pass that out by tomorrow or the next day. Or perhaps you will be constipated, not passing out your pancakes and syrup for days, passing it inc...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - August 30, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates bloating bowel flora bran constipation Dr. Davis fiber grain-free grains hydrate Inflammation laxatives Opiate drugs Opiods prebiotic undoctored wheat belly Wheat Belly Total Health Source Type: blogs

Constipation Nation
Our ancestors who lived without grains, sugars, and soft drinks enjoyed predictable bowel behavior. They ate some turtle, fish, clams, mushrooms, coconut, or mongongo nuts for breakfast, and out it all came that afternoon or evening—large, steamy, filled with undigested remains and prolific quantities of bacteria, no straining, laxatives, or stack of magazines required. If instead you are living a modern life and have pancakes with maple syrup for breakfast, you’ll be lucky to pass that out by tomorrow or the next day. Or perhaps you will be constipated, not passing out your pancakes and syrup for days, passing it inco...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - August 30, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates bloating bowel flora bran constipation Dr. Davis fiber grain-free grains hydrate Inflammation laxatives Opiate drugs Opiods prebiotic undoctored wheat belly Wheat Belly Total Health Source Type: blogs