Why Isn ’ t Price Transparency Working in Healthcare?
By TAYLOR CHRISTENSEN, MD I strongly believe that getting people the information and incentives necessary to choose higher-value providers and insurers is the solution to improving value in healthcare (see my Healthcare Incentives Framework). But, you say, we’ve tried that and it doesn’t work, and current efforts are a waste of time! Here’s an example of some great research that you might use to support your opinion: Examining a Health Care Price Transparency Tool: Who Uses It, and How They Shop for Care (Sinaiko and Rosenthal, Health Affairs, April 2016) The news media would see this and...
Source: The Health Care Blog - November 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Patients The Business of Health Care price transparency TAYLOR CHRISTENSEN Source Type: blogs

What's new in midwifery - 4th September 2019
Some things you might like to know about.StatisticsMaternity statisticsApril 2019May 2019 Quarterly conceptions to women aged under 18 years (England)April to June 2018Public Health EnglandGeneration genome and the opportunities for screening programmesIncludes opportunities in screening for fetal anomalies, sickle cell and thalassemia, infectiosu diseases in pregnancy, and newborn blood spot screening and newborn hearing screening.NewsLots this time...The man who gave birth (Guardian podcast)Freddy McConnell is a trans man who decided to begin the process of conceiving and delivering his own child.  The fil...
Source: Browsing - September 4, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Tags: midwifery Source Type: blogs

Cord Blood Stem Cells Help Young Boy with Tetra Spastic Cerebral Palsy
Tomas’s mom developed pre-eclampsia, a hypertension disorder sometimes developed during pregnancy which can cause serious health risks for both mom and baby, during her fifth month of pregnancy. This high blood pressure pregnancy complication affects kidney and liver function and when left untreated, can lead to blood clotting failure, fluid buildup in the lungs, seizures and in severe cases, death. With this diagnosis, Tomas’s mom was put on immediate bed rest to try and relieve her pre-eclampsia symptoms. Just when she was feeling some relief, Tomas’s mom received the unfortunate news that her baby&rsqu...
Source: Cord Blood News - July 30, 2019 Category: Perinatology & Neonatology Authors: Maze Cord Blood Tags: babies Cord Blood medical research pregnancy stem cells Source Type: blogs

Supporting your newborn ’s health: Intestinal colonization after elective cesarean section
This study confirms meta-analyses of smaller studies in the United States that suggest that cesarean section deliveries are risk factors for development of allergy and autoimmune disease. Elective cesarean section deliveries have increased from 5% in 1970 to 25% in 2010 in the US, while at the same time the incidence of autoimmune diseases has increased in Western society over the last several decades, and there may be a correlation. Altered intestinal colonization in medically-indicated vs. elective cesarean sections We have learned that major changes in intestinal colonization occur after elective cesarean sections (thos...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - July 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Allan Walker, MD Tags: Digestive Disorders Family Planning and Pregnancy Probiotics Women's Health Source Type: blogs

Microbiome: The first 1,000 days
In the United States and other developed countries, we have seen a shift over the past several decades in the types of illness people struggle with. Public health campaigns around vaccination, sanitation, and judicious use of antibiotics have largely eradicated many infectious illnesses. As the nature of disease has shifted to inflammatory conditions, we’ve seen a striking increase in allergy and autoimmune conditions such as diabetes, obesity, inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, and multiple sclerosis. The microbiome — the varied and teeming colonies of gut bacteria inside of us — may be helping ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - May 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Allan Walker, MD Tags: Digestive Disorders Family Planning and Pregnancy Inflammation Probiotics Source Type: blogs

BioethicsTV (April 15-18, 2019): #TheResident, #NewAmsterdam
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. Jump to The Resident (Seasons 2; Episode 20): Maternal mortality in black women; Jump to New Amsterdam (Season 1; Episode 18): Gestational surrogacy The Resident (Season 2; Episode 20): Maternal mortality in black women A young black family is in the OB ward for a C-section to deliver their second baby. The OB displays overt racism when he asks Pravesh, “What country are you from”? Pravesh responds, “New Jersey.” Post-surgery the mother has pain and some blood in her urine output.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 21, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: BioethicsTV Featured Posts Reproductive Ethics Social Justice black maternal mortality gestational surrogacy Source Type: blogs

What's new in midwifery - 19th March 2019
Some recent things you may like to know about (a day early):NHS EnglandSaving Babies ’ Lives version two: a care bundle for reducing perinatal mortalityAn overview of workforce data for nurses, midwives and health visitors in the NHSNational Institute of Health ResearchNIHR Highlight: Management of LabourResearch evidence on some aspects of labourNICE NICE surveillance decision to update CG190, Intrapartum care for healthy women and babies (CG190, 2014)Public Health EnglandStillbirth and Infant Mortality Tool  A planning tool for examining factors that influence stillbirth and infant death at the popul...
Source: Browsing - March 19, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Tags: midwifery Source Type: blogs

If You Want to Avoid a C-Section Choose Your Hospital Wisely
We have an epidemic of C-sections in the US, now accounting for almost 1 in 3 births. That represents a 50% increase since the mid-90s, despite all the advances we’ve seen in obstetrical care. Sometimes C-sections are critical to saving the … Continue reading → The post If You Want to Avoid a C-Section Choose Your Hospital Wisely appeared first on PeterUbel.com. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 6, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: PeterUbel.com Tags: Health Care Behavioral Economics and Public Policy health policy Peter Ubel syndicated Source Type: blogs

8 Vital Ways Dads Can Support Their Partners ’ Mental Health Postpartum
You’ll be bringing your baby home soon. Or maybe you already have. And you want to be there for your spouse. You know that having a baby not only affects your wife’s body, but it also affects her mental health. You want to be supportive, encouraging and helpful. But you’re not exactly sure how to do that. What does it look like to support your spouse’s mental health? Where do you start? What should you avoid? Here, you’ll find suggestions from Kirsten Brunner, MA, LPC, a perinatal mental health and relationship expert. She’s the co-author of The Birth Guy’s Go-To Guide for New D...
Source: World of Psychology - March 4, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Books Family Friends General Mental Health and Wellness Parenting Pregnancy Self-Help Child Development Fatherhood Postpartum Source Type: blogs

BioethicsTV (January 21-25): #TheResident #TheGoodDoctor #NewAmsterdam #ChicagoMed
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. Jump to The Resident (Season 1; Episode 11): Listening to patients; Jump to The Good Doctor (Season 2: Episode 12): Paying the Piper; Jump to New Amsterdam (Season 1; Episode 12): Impaired Colleagues, Robin Hood docs;Jump to Chicago Med (Season 4; Episode 12): Maternal/Fetal Conflict and Giving Bad News The Resident (Season 1; Episode 11): Listening to patients Marisol, a woman in her early 30s, comes to the ED complaining of abdominal pain, with a history of an ectopic pregnancy (lost her right ovary) and a stillbirth after a C-section.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 25, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: BioethicsTV Conflict of Interest Featured Posts professional ethics Reproductive Ethics Source Type: blogs

The Evolution of Technology in the Healthcare Workspace – Fun Friday
This week's healthcare humor comes from Aaron Miri and C-Section Comics (which is a funny name in and of itself). You're going to want to click a few times to see the full comic, but this is a pretty funny evolution to consider. I especially like the expressions on the man's face as technology in his workspace evolves. (Source: EMR and HIPAA)
Source: EMR and HIPAA - January 4, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: John Lynn Tags: Healthcare IT IT Dev Ops Computer on Wheels COW Fun Friday Healthcare Technology Healthcare Voice Assistant Healthcare Workstations Workstation on Wheels WOW Source Type: blogs

Life-Saving Data That Is Nowhere To Be Found: Hospitals ’ C-section Rates
By DANI BRADLEY, MS, MPH  The United States is the only developed nation in the world with a steadily increasing maternal mortality rate — and C-sections are to blame. Nearly 32% of babies are born via C-section in the United States, a rate of double or almost triple what the World Health Organization recommends. While C-sections are an incredibly important life-saving intervention when vaginal delivery is too dangerous, they are not devoid of risks for mom or for baby. Hospitals and doctors alike are aware, as it’s been widely reported that unnecessary C-sections are dangerous — and hospitals and do...
Source: The Health Care Blog - October 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: matthew holt Tags: Data Hospitals Patients maternal health Pregnancy Tech Source Type: blogs

The Exposing the Silence Project
“Well, at least you have a healthy baby!” is one of the most common phrases a mother who went through a traumatic birth experiences hears. While the friend or family member may mean well and simply be trying to show optimism, he or she is often isolating the deep pain the mother may be going through. As part of my research on maternal health, I came across the photography and advocacy project Exposing the Silence: Documenting Birth Trauma and the Strength of Women across America. The project brings to light a little noticed group of women– women who experienced past sexual abuse that can be triggered duri...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - September 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

What's new in midwifery - 22nd August 2018
Some recent things you might need to know about.Royal College of AnaesthetistsThe care of the critically ill woman in childbirth: enhanced maternal care 2018. Summarises recommendations relevant to the care of pregnant or recently pregnant, acutely or chronically unwell women, who require acute hospital maternity and critical care specialist services. NHS EnglandCCG maternity assessment, containing the independent panel commentary, methodology of the ratings for 2017/18 and the CCG individual assessment ratings for 2017/18. CCG Improvement and Assessment Framework (CCG IAF) – Maternity Support Offer,an...
Source: Browsing - August 22, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Tags: midwifery Source Type: blogs

The fecalization of America
I’ve been lately discussing the issue of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, or SIBO, a situation in which bowel microorganisms (especially of the undesirable Enterobacteriaceae variety such as E. coli and Shigella) ascend up from the colon and colonize the ileum, jejunum, duodenum, and stomach. This has numerous health implications that are only beginning to be appreciated: irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), fibromyalgia, psoriasis and other skin rashes, restless leg syndrome, diverticular disease, heightened body-wide inflammation, increased risk for colon cancer—SIBO is either synonymous with these condition...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - July 10, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates bowel flora dysbiosis Inflammation microbiota prebiotic probiotic sibo small intestinal bacterial overgrowth undoctored wheat belly Source Type: blogs

My patient, my friend: a sometimes stressful relationship
Seeing patients in my OB/GYN office this morning, I try to stave off the mild nervousness rumbling inside of me. My good friend Monica is having a C-section this afternoon, and I’m performing it. We met ten years ago when I walked my three-year-old daughter into Monica’s preschool classroom for the first time. Monica sat on the floor, a child in her lap and others playing around her. Like them, I felt drawn by her calm, soothing manner and infectious laugh. Over time, our friendship grew: At school or social gatherings, we always ended up giggling together. We took family trips together, trained together for ma...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 7, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/andrea-eisenberg" rel="tag" > Andrea Eisenberg, MD < /a > Tags: Physician OB/GYN Source Type: blogs

Accuro Helps to Make Epidurals and Spinals Easier: Interview with Will Mauldin, CEO of Rivanna Medical
Performing epidural and spinal anesthesia requires a good deal of training and being able to sense when the needle reaches the desired location. This is certainly not foolproof and some patients are harder to work with than others. One issue is that a sonographer is usually required to operate the ultrasound while the anesthesiologist delivers the needle. Accuro, a new ultrasound device recently cleared by the FDA, offers capabilities that can alleviate a sonographer from having to help with epidurals and spinals. We wanted to learn more and took a chance to ask some question of Will Mauldin, CEO of Rivanna Medical, the Ch...
Source: Medgadget - April 30, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Anesthesiology Neurology Pain Management Source Type: blogs

The drama of a C-section: It takes a team
She pushes her cleaning cart into the bright room. “Looks like the usual mess,” she mumbles to herself, pushing a loose piece of hair back into her blue cap. Methodically, she cleans the room beginning with the operating table, stripping off the bloody sheets. Then cleaning the floor of blood-stained shoe prints, amniotic fluid and bits of paper, needle caps and such, that managed to escape hands and land on the floor. She leaves no traces of the previous surgery. She sets aside the surgical instruments to be sterilized for the next case, mindful to keep the set together. When all is done, she arranges the room...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 12, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/andrea-eisenberg" rel="tag" > Andrea Eisenberg, MD < /a > Tags: Physician OB/GYN Surgery Source Type: blogs

What this medical student learned from running a marathon
“4 ounces water every mile, half an electrolyte ‘gu’ pack over 2.5 miles, ¼ energy bar every 6 miles” — a.k.a. how did you manage training for a marathon while in medical school?  The simple truth: I decided to run a marathon, so I did. Longer story: months of rigorous training, more moments of doubt than I care to recall, and insights already positively impacting my medical training. Training for and running a marathon is a time-intensive commitment of physical and mental endurance. Age-old lessons of “you can accomplish anything you set your mind to; hard work pays off...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 29, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/shoshana-weiner" rel="tag" > Shoshana Weiner < /a > Tags: Education Medical school Surgery Source Type: blogs

What to Decide When You ’ re Expecting
By ERIN LANDAU and REENA AGGARWAL, MD Selecting an obstetrician or midwife and birth center or hospital is arguably one of the most important decisions that a pregnant woman makes. This choice will determine many aspects of a woman’s pregnancy journey, including the likelihood that she delivers via C-section. To understand how women choose their obstetric provider and their delivery facility, Ovia Health has teamed up with Ariadne Labs to survey women and help shed light on this important decision-making process. C-sections in America Few would debate that the United States is experiencing a C-section epidemic. One ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - March 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Aridane Labs c-section Ovia Health Ovia Pregnancy App Source Type: blogs

The Pregnancy Choice — How Women Make Their Most Important Pregnancy Decision
By ERIN LANDAU and REENA AGGARWAL, MD Selecting an obstetrician or midwife and birth center or hospital is arguably one of the most important decisions that a pregnant woman makes. This choice will determine many aspects of a woman’s pregnancy journey, including the likelihood that she delivers via C-section. To understand how women choose their obstetric provider and their delivery facility, Ovia Health has teamed up with Ariadne Labs to survey women and help shed light on this important decision-making process. C-sections in America Few would debate that the United States is experiencing a C-section epidemic. One o...
Source: The Health Care Blog - March 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Aridane Labs c-section Ovia Health Ovia Pregnancy App Source Type: blogs

News From 2055: Gene Therapy Went Wrong? Mother Dies After Fetus Breaks Out Of Womb
A short story written by Margit Hilland Laerum as part of Dr. Bertalan Meskó’s course: Lessons in Digital Health at Semmelweis University. The dystopic scenario details possible consequences of gene therapies that might make us think about how to prevent ethical issues in time. Following the death of 26-year-old Petra Pollutino, NYPD has confirmed that the woman bled to death as a result of her 6-month old fetus bursting out of her womb.  Pollutino was attending a tennis match Saturday, 14 August 2055 at the New York Tennis Club when she suddenly fell ill. Witnesses reported gruesome scenes. They d...
Source: The Medical Futurist - February 27, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Medical Science Fiction future gene therapy genetics Healthcare Medicine scifi short story technology Source Type: blogs

Stop opioid addiction where it starts: in the hospital
Doctors at some of the largest U.S. hospital chains admit they went overboard with opioids to make people as pain-free as possible, and now they shoulder part of the blame for the nation’s opioid crisis. In an effort to be part of the cure, they’ve begun to issue an uncomfortable warning to patients: You’re going to feel some pain. Even for people who’ve never struggled with drug abuse, studies are finding that patients are at risk of addiction anytime they go under the knife. “I had the C-section, had the kiddo,” said Michelle Leavy of Las Vegas. “And then they tell...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 29, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/blake-farmer" rel="tag" > Blake Farmer < /a > Tags: Conditions Hospital-Based Medicine Surgery Source Type: blogs

Science left unquestioned on BBC Radio 4 Today
When there’s something “sciencey” on BBC Radio4 Today program, the interviewers never seems to ask any of the obvious “sciencey” questions about the subject. Today was no exception… A Professor from Liverpool was suggesting should could reduce Caesarean section rates by giving the expectant mothers whose labour was not progressing a drink of bicarbonate of soda. Apparently, blood around the uterus (or womb) was too acidic in these women. I looked at this research which seems to have been published in June 2017 [https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28587493], not entirely sure why it&rsqu...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - January 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: David Bradley Tags: Science Source Type: blogs

Science left unquestioned on BBC Radio 4 Today (again)
When there’s something “sciencey” on BBC Radio4 Today program, the interviewers never seems to ask any of the obvious “sciencey” questions about the subject. Today was no exception… A Professor from Liverpool was suggesting could reduce Caesarean section rates by giving the expectant mothers, whose labour was not progressing, a drink of bicarbonate of soda. Apparently, blood around the uterus (or womb) was too acidic in these women. I looked at this research which seems to have been published in June 2017 [https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28587493], not entirely sure why it’s s...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - January 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: David Bradley Tags: Science Source Type: blogs

Medgadget Sci-Fi Contest 2017: Meet The Winning Stories
Ladies and Gentlemen, this is the moment you have all been waiting for – the day that the winners of the Medgadget Medical Sci-Fi Competition are announced and their fantastic stories are published! First, we would like to thank Eko Devices, the wonderful sponsors of our contest, that make the coolest and most advanced digital stethoscopes out there.The winner of our contest will receive an Eko CORE stethoscope that is both acoustic and electronic, has all the features of both, can amplify sound, record audio waveforms, and connect to your phone. Thank you, Eko! Since we announced our Medical Sci-Fi Writing Contest i...
Source: Medgadget - December 15, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Exclusive Source Type: blogs

Sensus Healthcare ’s Technology Uses Low-Energy X-rays Directly on Cancer Cells: Interview with CEO Joe Sardano
Sensus Healthcare is a medical device company that focuses on providing non-invasive and cost-effective treatment of non-melanoma skin cancers and keloids utilizing superficial radiation technology (SRT). Their proprietary, FDA-cleared SRT technology is used to effectively and safely treat oncological and non-oncological skin conditions. The radiation is focused onto cancer cells almost exclusively, and it penetrates no more than 5mm under the surface of the skin, sparing nearby tissues. In 2013, Sensus Healthcare received FDA clearance in the United States to treat keloids with the SRT-100 device. Earlier this summer, Chi...
Source: Medgadget - November 20, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Alice Ferng Tags: Dermatology Exclusive Oncology Source Type: blogs

What Baseball Can Teach Doctors
By MICHAEL MILLENSON Baseball, like medicine, is deeply imbued with a sense of tradition, and no team more so than the New York Yankees, disdainful of innovations like placing players’ names on the backs of their jerseys and resistant to eroding strict standards related to haircuts and beards. It’s why doctors and patients alike should pay special attention to why the Yankees parted ways with their old manager and what they now seek instead. In a word: “collaboration.” That’s the takeaway from a recent New York Times article examining why the Yankees declined to re-sign manager Joe Girardi de...
Source: The Health Care Blog - November 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Michael Millenson Source Type: blogs

LITFL Review 306
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 306th LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chunk of FOAM. The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week RebelEM unleashes his top 10 pearls from ACEP17 [LP] EPMonthly published an ER acco...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - November 13, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marjorie Lazoff, MD Tags: LITFL review #FOAMped #FOAMresus #FOAMsim #FOAMus #meded FOAMcc FOAMed LITFL R/V Source Type: blogs

Medical students must have this mindset
It is early on a Saturday morning when I walk out of the elevator of Doan Hall looking for a nursing desk to call the fourth-year anesthesiology resident I am supposed to be shadowing. Instead, I am met with a set of double doors and a staff-only sign. Before walking through the doors, I decided to read the placard placed on the wall next to them. As I begin to read, I hear footsteps approaching and turn to my right only to be met with the resident who immediately informs me of an emergency C-section that she was just called into. She instructs me to hang my white coat on the wall and grab a scrub cap. Then she speeds away...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 6, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/manisha-ravi%e2%80%8b" rel="tag" > Manisha Ravi ​ < /a > Tags: Education Hospital-Based Medicine Medical school Source Type: blogs

Cardiology MCQ Test 6
Time limit: 0 Quiz-summary 0 of 20 questions completed Questions: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Information This test series requires login for attempting. You can login easily with your Facebook account (Use the CONNECT WITH icon on the upper part of right sidebar displaying t...
Source: Cardiophile MD - October 27, 2017 Category: Cardiology Authors: Johnson Francis Tags: General Cardiology Source Type: blogs

Outrageous Hospital Expenses
Getting relatively simple procedures is much more expensive in the US than elsewhere. Take the cost of an appendectomy: Or having a baby: Or having a baby by C-section, a more invasive procedure that is not only more expensive in … Continue reading → The post Outrageous Hospital Expenses appeared first on PeterUbel.com. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - October 12, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Peter Ubel Tags: Health Care healthcare costs Peter Ubel syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

The worst moment of my life shaped me into the person I am today
More than one million women experience pregnancy or infant loss every year in the U.S., yet many stay silent about their experiences. What if we were brave enough to break the silence? Empowered to declare, “My baby existed and mattered?” In 2011, I was a newly-minted pediatrician and finally living the life I dreamed of after so many years of hard work. My husband and I announced my pregnancy with a series of growing bump photos. I felt great, ate healthy, exercised, and received regular prenatal care. But thirty-five weeks in, I experienced some issues that I thought were normal pregnancy symptoms. My legs we...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 6, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/priscilla-sarmiento-gupana" rel="tag" > Priscilla Sarmiento-Gupana, DO < /a > Tags: Physician Hospital-Based Medicine OB/GYN Oncology/Hematology Source Type: blogs

48 hours in the life of an on-call gynecologist
An on-call weekend: 48 hours of being at any moment “on,” of being edgy, of being exhausted. This weekend included a full house of patients to see in the hospital, a patient list of three pages to be exact. As I went from patient to patient, room to room, each held its own unique story filled with the yin and yang of life. I realize too, this may be a vulnerable time for them, a time they feel weakened and tired of their medical issues or just the fatigue of childbirth, take a toll on them physically and emotionally. To help create order out of the disorder with the variety of patients before me at the hospital...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 25, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/andrea-eisenberg" rel="tag" > Andrea Eisenberg, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Hospital-Based Medicine OB/GYN Primary Care Source Type: blogs

5 Misconceptions about Cord Blood Banking
When it comes to life-saving medical decisions, most people want to hear just the facts. And it’s no different when it comes to cord blood banking. Unfortunately, when you do a simple Google search on cord blood banking, you get a lot of information that may or may not be factual about the process and possibilities of cord blood banking, influencing your decisions with unreliable data. Here’s 5 Cord Blood Misconceptions debunked! Myth #1: Treating diseases with cord blood is still in the experimental phase. Fact: Not anymore. The first cord blood transplant was performed in 1988. Since then, 30,000 cord ...
Source: Cord Blood News - August 1, 2017 Category: Perinatology & Neonatology Authors: Maze Cord Blood Tags: Cord Blood private cord blood bank Source Type: blogs

Legal Briefing: Unwanted Cesareans and Obstetric Violence
In my latest legal briefing for the Journal of Clinical Ethics, I discuss "Legal Briefing: Unwanted Cesareans and Obstetric Violence." A capacitated pregnant woman has a nearly unqualified right to refuse a cesarean section. Her right to say “no” takes precedence over clinicians’ preferences and even over clinicians’ concerns about fetal health. Leading medical societies, human rights organizations, and appellate courts have all endorsed this principle. Nevertheless, clinicians continue to limit reproductive liberty by forcing and coercing women to have unwanted cesareans. This “Lega...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 12, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

A physician broke down walls, or so she thought
I woke up at 6 a.m. to my daughter’s annoyingly, loud alarm. Since I was on call, my first reflex was to look at my iPad to see if I had patients in labor. I am part of an 11 doctor call group, so when I am on call, I cover all the patients of those doctors that come into the hospital. I scrolled through the patient list and saw three on “the board,” listing the laboring patients in our group. It looked like I didn’t need to rush in, so I hung out with my two high schoolers until they left, put on my scrubs and left the house with coffee in hand as well as everything I would need to stay at the hosp...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 25, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/andrea-eisenberg" rel="tag" > Andrea Eisenberg, MD < /a > Tags: Physician OB/GYN Source Type: blogs

Having access to health care saved this patient ’s life
Now more than ever, health insurance is a staple story in the 24-hour news cycle. Opinions vary widely on the issue, as do politician’s thoughts on the matter. Debates rage, tensions grow, and deeper divides are formed as our government wrestles with this colossal dispute. Nestled at the heart of it all though is a basic question: Is health insurance a right or a privilege in the United States? I’m alive today because my school district, where I’ve now taught for 20 years, offers the “Cadillac” of insurance plans. On April 26, 2006, I checked into the hospital for a scheduled C-section. Due to...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 16, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/lisa-goodman-helfand" rel="tag" > Lisa Goodman-Helfand < /a > Tags: Patient Patients Source Type: blogs

Home births sometimes make sense for health insurers
I sat in my car, anxiously watching the minutes tick by as I ruminated over and over the words, I had prepared for this crucial meeting. I had arrived much earlier than the appointed time, knowing I would need a few moments to calm my nerves before walking into a room to face a panel of eight legal, medical, and insurance professionals. I was pregnant with my sixth baby and was seeking to have an out-of-hospital birth under the care of licensed and professional midwives in my home state of Wisconsin — just as I’d given birth to my last baby. Due to having a history of multiple prior cesarean births, if I were t...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 10, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/rachelle-hansen" rel="tag" > Rachelle Hansen < /a > Tags: Patient OB/GYN Source Type: blogs

First Kicks by Dr. Greene: Track Your Baby ’ s Development During Pregnancy, by Week
Sign-up here for a set of week-by-week newsletters so you can follow your baby’s development from now until the beautiful moment of birth. Get Dr. Greene's Pregnancy Newsletter Sign up for Dr. Greene's FREE week-by-week newsletter, timed to your pregnancy to keep you up to date on every stage of your baby's development. Success! Now check your email to confirm your subscription. There was an error submitting your subscription. Please try again. First Name Your baby's due date? ...
Source: Conversations with Dr Greene - May 2, 2017 Category: Child Development Authors: DrGreene Team Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Hospitals should quit alienating pregnant health care consumers
When Barbara (name changed) recently underwent her fourth Cesarean section, she was appalled by the care she received during her recovery.  Her catheter overflowed, and a CNA asked her to check her own incision.  When the CNA asked if she was breastfeeding her baby, Barbara replied tearfully that she couldn’t lift her out the bassinette.  Rooming-in is a great idea. Unless you’ve had a 36-hour labor or major abdominal surgery. Pregnant women are vital health care consumers as they usually have a partner and one or more children who will presumably be accessing care in the future. However, many pr...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 21, 2017 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/poppy-daniels" rel="tag" > Poppy Daniels, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Hospital OB/GYN Source Type: blogs

Childbirth in the U.S. and India: How it falls short and why
After eight years of practicing obstetrics and researching childbirth in the United States, I know as well as anyone that the American maternal health system could be better. Our way of childbirth is the costliest in the world. Our health outcomes, from mortality rates to birth weights, are far, far from the best. The reasons we fall short are not obvious. In medicine, providing more care is often mistaken for providing better care. In childbirth the relationship between more and better is complicated. Texan obstetricians, when compared to their counterparts in neighboring New Mexico, are 50% more likely to intervene on t...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 19, 2017 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/neel-shah" rel="tag" > Neel Shah, MD < /a > Tags: Physician OB/GYN Source Type: blogs

A harrowing C-section, performed on a close friend
We chat about the day, as I use a sharp knife to cut into her. We joke about my kids, as the blood is spurting. We reminisce about our friendship, as I rip open her tissue. For most surgeons, their patients are asleep as they perform their surgery. In obstetrics, however, we want our patients awake, not only to witness their baby’s arrival, but also because it is safer. When I step back, it is a surreal moment, to be inside someone’s body while also talking with them. It is particularly challenging when it is one of your closest friends, and it is one of the hardest deliveries you have ever performed. When she ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 5, 2017 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/andrea-eisenberg" rel="tag" > Andrea Eisenberg, MD < /a > Tags: Conditions OB/GYN Source Type: blogs

Is Physician Spending Linked to Malpractice Claims?
A 2015 study is coming back to the forefront with a new interview by Dr. Anupam Jena. Dr. Jena authored the 2015 study, Physician spending and subsequent risks of malpractice claims: an observational study. The study attempted to answer the question: is a higher use of resources by physicians associated with a reduced risk of malpractice claims, finding that “across specialties, greater average spending by physicians was associated with reduced risk of incurring a malpractice claim.” The Study Jena and the other researchers matched the spending of 25,000 Florida physicians in 2000-2009 to their malpractice cl...
Source: Policy and Medicine - November 9, 2016 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs

These Scope of Practice Laws Don ’t Improve Health Outcomes, Serve Mainly as Barriers to Entry
Scope of practice (SOP) restrictions in health care professions are often portrayed as a necessary intervention to protect consumer health and safety. Given how common this argument is, there have been surprisingly few studies trying to determine whether SOP restrictions actually have any impact on such outcomes. A newworking paper seeks to fill this gap in the literature by determining whether SOP laws for certified nurse midwives (CNMs) affect health outcomes. On average, it turns out that the restrictions do not have a significant impact on maternal behaviors or infant health outcomes. Instead, they “primarily ser...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - November 2, 2016 Category: American Health Authors: Charles Hughes Source Type: blogs

True Story: One Father ’ s Struggle with Postpartum Depression
Dads get the “baby blues” too. People might not realize this, but, after the birth of a child, both women and men can encounter symptoms of postpartum depression. I’m speaking from experience here. After the birth of my daughter, which endures as one of the happiest moments of my life, I found myself struggling with unexpected waves of anxiety, fear, and depression. It was horrible, and what made it worse, was that I was very uncomfortable talking about it. 8 Heartbreaking Secrets ALL Men Keep From The Women They Love Here’s why — don’t you hate it when a couple says “we’re ...
Source: World of Psychology - October 31, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Staff Tags: Depression Disorders Family Men's Issues Parenting Personal Publishers YourTango anxiety Baby Blues birth Child Emotions Father Fatherhood Fear panic postpartum depression Pregnancy Tom Burns Wife women Source Type: blogs

3 Ways to Navigate the Emotional Side of Pregnancy
Pregnancy is a beautiful and miraculous time. You’re growing a baby for goodness’ sake. And for many moms-to-be, it’s also a tough time. There are the physical symptoms—marathon-level fatigue, nausea, heartburn, appetite loss—which ensure that you don’t feel like yourself. The days might be limping by, and all you want to do is spend hours on the couch, vegging out. There also are the emotional symptoms. You might be feeling overwhelmed, anxious, frustrated and sad—all in one day or all in one hour. It can feel like 500 different concerns are running through your mind (and heart). ...
Source: World of Psychology - October 5, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Books General Habits Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Self-Help Stress Women's Issues anxiety Calm Discomfort Emotional Health Emotions Guilt mindful walking Mindfulness Mood Swings Personal Needs Pregnancy P Source Type: blogs

Why ‘Government Patent Use’ To Lower Drug Costs Won’t Stifle Innovation
In a May article in Health Affairs, we proposed that the federal government consider using an existing law to negotiate or compel lower drug prices in the United States for certain important drugs with excessive prices. We’ve been gratified at the interest the proposal has generated on Health Affairs Blog and elsewhere. We believe it illuminates a significant opportunity to improve access to important medicines, and also to more efficiently allocate our health care dollars. A recent commentary on this blog by Henry Grabowski, however, expresses concern about the impact of our proposal on future drug innovation. As we...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - July 28, 2016 Category: Health Management Authors: Amy Kapczynski and Aaron Kesselheim Tags: Costs and Spending Drugs and Medical Technology Featured Quality drug innovation hepatitis C Research and Development Source Type: blogs

DM / DNB Cardiology Entrance New Test Series 4
Time limit: 0 Quiz-summary 0 of 30 questions completed Questions: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 ...
Source: Cardiophile MD - July 16, 2016 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis, MD, DM, FACC, FRCP Edin, FRCP London Tags: Cardiology MCQ DM / DNB Cardiology Entrance Featured Source Type: blogs