Chemical contained in broccoli extract could offer help for autism symptoms
Broccoli, cauliflower and cabbage could hold the key to helping those with autism, new research suggests. (Source: The Independent - Science)
Source: The Independent - Science - October 14, 2014 Category: Science Tags: Science Source Type: news

Chemical present in broccoli, other vegetables may improve autism symptoms
(Massachusetts General Hospital) A small study led by investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital for Children and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine has found evidence that daily treatment with sulforaphane -- a molecule found in foods such as broccoli, cauliflower and cabbage -- may improve some symptoms of autism spectrum disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 13, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Brussels Sprouts, Quinoa Pilaf, and Cauliflower and Broccoli Au Gratin
Elaine Magee, MPH, RD, shares recipes for Thanksgiving side dishes: Brussels sprouts with bacon, quinoa pilaf with cranberries and pecans, and cauliflower and broccoli au gratin. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - August 28, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Recipes for Health: Quinoa Spaghetti With Cauliflower, Almonds, Tomatoes and Chickpeas
Cauliflower is often matched with pasta in Italy; this version is all about texture.     (Source: NYT)
Source: NYT - February 20, 2014 Category: Nutrition Authors: By MARTHA ROSE SHULMAN Tags: Cooking and Cookbooks Pasta Recipes Diet and Nutrition Source Type: news

Recipes for Health: Roasted Cauliflower Gratin With Tomatoes and Goat Cheese
A beautiful, light gratin with Middle Eastern spices.     (Source: NYT)
Source: NYT - January 20, 2014 Category: Nutrition Authors: By MARTHA ROSE SHULMAN Tags: Cauliflower Tomatoes Cooking and Cookbooks Recipes Diet and Nutrition Source Type: news

Screening for Gene Function Using the FOX (Full-Length cDNA OvereXpressor Gene) Hunting System
Mutant resources are indispensable for the characterization of the functions of genes. There are two types of mutants, loss-of-function and gain-of-function mutants. Recently, we have developed a novel system in plants that uses a gain-of-function approach and is named as the FOX (full-length cDNA overexpressor gene) hunting system. In this system, Arabidopsis full-length cDNAs (fl-cDNAs) are randomly over-expressed under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter in Arabidopsis plants. These transgenic plants, or Arabidopsis FOX lines, possess ectopically expressed fl-cDNAs in their genome. Chemical g...
Source: Springer protocols feed by Plant Sciences - December 6, 2013 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Cabbage compound may 'protect against radiation'
Conclusion This early stage rodent study suggests that DIM might be useful in protecting against the effects of radiation, whether exposure occurs accidentally or during medical treatment. However, the experiment was performed in rats and mice and it is uncertain whether similar effects could be achieved in humans. It would be ethically impossible to irradiate humans so the effects of DIM could be tested, although research could be undertaken in patients undergoing radiotherapy for cancer. Far more research is required before DIM could be considered an effective agent against the effects of radiation. If you have been rec...
Source: NHS News Feed - October 16, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food/diet Medical practice Source Type: news

Cabbage compound protects healthy tissue from radiation damage
A team of US researchers has discovered that an anti-cancer compound present in cruciferous vegetables, such as cabbage, cauliflower and broccoli, also protects rodents from lethal doses of radiation. The compound, called 3,3'-diindolylmethane, and known more simply as "DIM," is already shown to be safe in humans, and so the researchers expect it could serve as a shield to protect healthy tissue in human cancer patients from damage by radiation therapy, or lessen its side effects... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 16, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Radiology / Nuclear Medicine Source Type: news

Shielding body from lethal radiation doses using compound derived from vegetables
Georgetown University Medical Center researchers say a compound derived from cruciferous vegetable such as cabbage, cauliflower and broccoli protected rats and mice from lethal doses of radiation. Their study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) suggests the compound, already shown to be safe for humans, may protect normal tissues during radiation therapy for cancer treatment and prevent or mitigate sickness caused by radiation exposure. The compound, known as DIM (3,3'-diindolylmethane), previously has been found to have cancer preventive properties... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 16, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Radiology / Nuclear Medicine Source Type: news

Could cabbage protect against the effects of radiation?
Researchers from Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Centre in Washington say cabbage, cauliflower and broccoli can protect healthy tissue following radiation damage. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 14, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Compound derived from vegetables shields rodents from lethal radiation doses
(Georgetown University Medical Center) Georgetown University Medical Center researchers say a compound derived from cruciferous vegetable such as cabbage, cauliflower and broccoli protected rats and mice from lethal doses of radiation. Their study, suggests the compound, already shown to be safe for humans, may protect normal tissues during radiation therapy for cancer treatment and prevent or mitigate sickness caused by radiation exposure. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 14, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Flavorful Dips May Bring Out the Veggie Lover in Your Child
If you're a parent of a young child, the phrase "Eat your veggies!" may be a common one in your home. While vegetables offer all kinds of benefits to kids and adults, alike, it can be a challenge to encourage picky eaters to enjoy things like broccoli, carrots and squash. However, a new study suggests that there are things parents can do to nurture young veggie lovers. read more (Source: Psychology Today Parenting Center)
Source: Psychology Today Parenting Center - August 30, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Debbie Glasser, Ph.D. Tags: Child Development Health Parenting 8 years associate director baked spinach brownies carrots cartoon faces cauliflower celery childhood obesity daily basis green beans healthy food macaroni and cheese obesity research red Source Type: news

Cruciferous Vegetables - Crammed With...
Cruciferous vegetables - broccoli, cauliflower, radishes, and several types of greens - are full of compounds that help prevent and fight cancer all through your body. Learn how these vegetables boost your health and why they are anticancer foods. (Source: About.com Breast Cancer)
Source: About.com Breast Cancer - June 10, 2013 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: breastcancer.guide at about.com Tags: health Source Type: news

Left Atrial Appendage Morphology by CT; AF Stroke RiskLeft Atrial Appendage Morphology by CT; AF Stroke Risk
Of four left-atrial-appendage morphology types by CT imaging, which had colorful names like "cauliflower" and "chicken wing," one independently predicted stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation but a low CHADS2 score. Heartwire (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - February 26, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news