Thanksgiving Recipe Roundup
I’m often asked to recommend recipes for Thanksgiving, so here’s a few suggestions for you all. I’ve never actually cooked a turkey, so this will just be sides and desserts. To be honest, that’s pretty much are all I care to eat at Thanksgiving dinner anyway. Noticeably missing from this list are recipes for cranberry sauce (I use the one on the cranberry bag – no need to mess with perfection), mashed potatoes (there is no recipe, it’s instinctual if you’re Patsy’s daughter), and stuffing (I’ve never made it, that gets assigned to someone else).   Hope the...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - November 18, 2022 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Uncategorized Gluten-free thanksgiving Holidays recipes Sides Thanksgiving desserts Thnksgiving recipes Vegetarian thanksgiving Source Type: blogs

Blistered Shishito Peppers
Thanks to my daughter for turning us on to Blistered Shishito Peppers – a simple, fast, delicious and fun appetizer. The Shishito is mild pepper brought to the US from Japan and now widely available here in the United States. We got ours from Trader Joes, but you can easily grow them in your home garden. The Shishito pepper likely came to Japan from Spain, where it is called a Padron pepper and is much hotter. It is believed to have mellowed after generations of selective breeding in Japanese soil. The fastest and most fun way to get to know Shishito is to toss them in a little olive oil, blister t...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - October 18, 2022 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Appetizers blistered shishito peppers charred shishito peppers Japnese food Source Type: blogs

Stolen Recipes
About a month ago, I did something I never envisioned I might do. I was in CVS waiting for the pharmacist to give me a flu shot, and while I was waiting, I browsed the magazine rack. I looked at one which was entirely recipes. There was a recipe which kind of caught my eye: it was for " Loaded Cauliflower Soup " . I would have bought the entire magazine, but then I looked at the price: a stunning $12.99...for a MAGAZINE with a flimsy cover (not even a real book).So I opened said magazine and snapped a photograph of the recipe on my phone instead. I suppose one could call that theft, except that I did not remove the magazin...
Source: Scott's Web Log - October 17, 2021 Category: Endocrinology Tags: Low-Carb food recipes Source Type: blogs

Fermented Foods and Your Gut: Why They Are So Good for Your Health
Do you have more than the occasional abdominal upset? If you find yourself singing the Pepto-Bismol jingle most days, why not consider adding more fermented foods to your diet.  You don’t have to go to a fancy health food store to buy exotic-sounding ingredients. You probably have many staples in your pantry and fridge. Here’s the skinny on fermented foods and your gut and how they benefit your overall health.  What Is Fermentation?  You might think of the term “fermentation” in association with beer or wine. However, this food preparation method goes back thousands of years — as far as 60...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - October 13, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jennifer Landis Tags: diet featured health and fitness self-improvement fermented foods gut health self improvement Source Type: blogs

How to stock a plant-based pantry (and fridge) on a budget
Given the current pandemic and related economic stressors, many of us are trying to maintain healthy habits while watching our expenses. One of the areas where we can support our immune system is through our food choices. We all have to eat, and eat several times a day, and selecting foods that support our health and our planet — while also saving money — is now a priority for many. People are going meatless for many reasons About a quarter of the US is now vegetarian, especially people ages 25 to 34. A survey from 2017 studied US attitudes toward animal farming, and found that 54% of Americans were trying to purchase ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - June 12, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Uma Naidoo, MD Tags: Cooking and recipes Food as medicine Healthy Eating Heart Health Nutrition Source Type: blogs

With a little planning, vegan diets can be a healthful choice
Recently there has been much discussion and many questions about vegan diets. Are vegan diets — which exclude meat, poultry, seafood, eggs, and dairy — healthful? Do they provide complete nutrition? Should I try one? Will it help me lose weight? Many people around the world eat plant-based diets for a variety of reasons, some because meat is not readily available or affordable, others because of religious convictions or concerns about animal welfare. Health has become another reason people are moving to plant-based diets. And research supports the idea that plant-based diets, including vegan diets, provide health benef...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - February 6, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Katherine D. McManus, MS, RD, LDN Tags: Healthy Eating Source Type: blogs

Healthy meals: 3 easy steps to success
Healthy meals don’t just happen — you need to make them happen. Here are three easy steps to get you on your way. Step 1: Make a plan The first step is to plan your menu for the week. It doesn’t need to be elaborate, just jot down what you and your family would like to eat. Then think about ways to make your choices healthier. Substitute chicken breast for steak and add more vegetables, for example. Can you streamline your cooking? Consider cooking a large batch of grains on the weekend and using them in more than one meal. Step 2: Shop smart You’ve already planned your menu. Once you make your shopping list, you...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - June 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Katherine D. McManus, MS, RD, LDN Tags: Health Healthy Eating Nutrition Source Type: blogs

Phytonutrients: Paint your plate with the colors of the rainbow
Did you know that adding color to your meals will help you live a longer, healthier life? Colorful fruits and vegetables can paint a beautiful picture of health because they contain phytonutrients, compounds that give plants their rich colors as well as their distinctive tastes and aromas. Phytonutrients also strengthen a plant’s immune system. They protect the plant from threats in their natural environment such as disease and excessive sun. When humans eat plant foods, phytonutrients protect us from chronic diseases. Phytonutrients have potent anti-cancer and anti-heart disease effects. And epidemiological research sug...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - April 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Katherine D. McManus, MS, RD, LDN Tags: Health Healthy Eating Source Type: blogs

A practical guide to the Mediterranean diet
The Mediterranean diet has received much attention as a healthy way to eat, and with good reason. The Mediterranean diet has been shown to reduce risk of heart disease, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, certain cancers, depression, and in older adults, a decreased risk of frailty, along with better mental and physical function. In January, US News and World Report named it the “best diet overall” for the second year running. What is the Mediterranean diet? The traditional Mediterranean diet is based on foods available in countries that border the Mediterranean Sea. The foundation for this healthy diet includes an abundanc...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - March 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Katherine D. McManus, MS, RD, LDN Tags: Health Healthy Eating Source Type: blogs

“ I need something to dip into guacamole ”
Dipping foods into various dips and sauces surely ranks among the favorite ways to enjoy food: dipping chips into salsa, celery sticks into guacamole, crackers into cheese, shrimp into cocktail sauce, etc. So how do we go about resuming our dipping habits sans wheat and grains? Here are some ideas for foods to use for dipping, healthy choices that contain no wheat or grains and provide limited exposure to carbohydrates, while remaining otherwise healthy. And some, like jicama and asparagus, also provide prebiotic fibers to nourish bowel flora; dip them into hummus and you’ll add even more probiotics to your day. Vegg...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - February 25, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates gluten-free grain-free wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Should I be eating more fiber?
You probably know the basics about fiber: it’s the part of plant foods that your body cannot digest, and there are two types — soluble fiber and insoluble fiber. Both types of fiber are good for us. Soluble fiber dissolves in water, forming a gel. It is the form of fiber that helps lower cholesterol levels, reduce the risk of heart disease, and regulate blood sugar levels. Soluble fiber is found in black beans, lima beans, Brussels sprouts, avocado, sweet potato, broccoli, turnips, and pears. Insoluble fiber passes through the digestive system relatively intact, adding bulk to stools. It is the form of fiber that preve...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - February 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Katherine D. McManus, MS, RD, LDN Tags: Diet and Weight Loss Health Healthy Eating Source Type: blogs

Pork Fried “ Rice ”
Here’s a recipe from my Wheat Belly 10-Minute (Or Less!) Cookbook, the Light Meals and Side-Dishes section. If you miss the pork fried rice that you used to order at Chinese restaurants, here is a way to recreate it using healthy ingredients with none of the common problem ingredients like MSG, wheat, cornstarch, or rice. To save time and effort, look for pre-riced cauliflower. Also, feel free to use as much healthy oils as you like, since we never limit fats or oils. Makes 4-6 servings 1 head cauliflower, broken into large pieces, or 16-ounces pre-riced cauliflower 2 tablespoons coconut oil, divided 4 scallions, sl...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - February 15, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates gluten gluten-free grain-free grains recipe wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Eech (Armenian bulgur)
I saw this dish being made on a TV cooking show. It looked delicious, so I decided to make the grain-free equivalent. It goes by the odd name “eech,” an Armenian dish made with onions, garlic, tomatoes. parsley, bell pepper, olive oil, lemon . . . and bulgur wheat. Everyone here, of course, objects to the inclusion of any seed of a grass plant in their lifestyle to avoid becoming diabetic, overweight, and having to massage your painful joints with rheumatoid arthritis or applying topical steroid creams for skin rashes. I therefore replaced the granular bulgur wheat with riced cauliflower. I believe it turned ou...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - January 13, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates Source Type: blogs

Gut feelings: How food affects your mood
The human microbiome, or gut environment, is a community of different bacteria that has co-evolved with humans to be beneficial to both a person and the bacteria. Researchers agree that a person’s unique microbiome is created within the first 1,000 days of life, but there are things you can do to alter your gut environment throughout your life. Ultra-processed foods and gut health What we eat, especially foods that contain chemical additives and ultra-processed foods, affects our gut environment and increases our risk of diseases. Ultra-processed foods contain substances extracted from food (such as sugar and starch), ad...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - December 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Uma Naidoo, MD Tags: Behavioral Health Digestive Disorders Food as medicine Healthy Eating Source Type: blogs

Healthy, Low Calorie Cauliflower Breadsticks
Do you think whoever named the cauliflower plant knew that one day we would evolve into overweight, carbohydrate-overloaded, gluten-intolerant creatures, who, in searching for a suitable lo-carb substitute would find their holy grail in that crucifer whose name is homonymous with the ground product of the very thing we both crave and shun? Think cauliFLOUR. Then go grind up a head of cauliflower in the food processor (or be lazy like me and buy Trader Joes riced cauliflower), steam or microwave it for 10 minutes, strain out the liquid in a tea towel, pour into a large bowl and add two egg whites, 1/4 cup hemp or flax seeds...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - October 14, 2018 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Uncategorized breadsticks cauliflower crackers Gluten-Free Lo fat low calorie SOuth beach diet Source Type: blogs