Make the Diagnosis: Dizziness Dilemma
(MedPage Today) -- Case Findings: The patient is a 42-year-old African American man who presents with a complaint of dizziness lightheadedness which occurred when he was standing up to go to the rest room 3 days ago. He denies any previous syncopal episodes. He has medically managed hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, cardiomyopathy with last ejection fraction of 35% with defibrillator placement 4 months previous. His ICD did not fire during the episode. His last cardiac catheterization prior to ICD implantation revealed normal coronaries. Patient has been compliant with metoprolol 25 mg twice daily, lisinopril 10 mg daily...
Source: MedPage Today Endocrinology - April 26, 2016 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

[Research Article] Detyrosinated microtubules buckle and bear load in contracting cardiomyocytes
The microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton can transmit mechanical signals and resist compression in contracting cardiomyocytes. How MTs perform these roles remains unclear because of difficulties in observing MTs during the rapid contractile cycle. Here, we used high spatial and temporal resolution imaging to characterize MT behavior in beating mouse myocytes. MTs deformed under contractile load into sinusoidal buckles, a behavior dependent on posttranslational “detyrosination” of α-tubulin. Detyrosinated MTs associated with desmin at force-generating sarcomeres. When detyrosination was reduced, MTs uncoupled fro...
Source: ScienceNOW - April 22, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Patrick Robison Source Type: news

Murine models of arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy benefit from GSK3β inhibition
(Journal of Clinical Investigation) In this issue of JCI Insight, investigators led by Jeffrey Saffitz of Harvard Medical School and Daniel Judge of John's Hopkins School of Medicine show that the GSK3β inhibitor SB2 benefits two murine models of arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 21, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Q and A: Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy May Not Cause Symptoms Until Later in Life
DEAR MAYO CLINIC: My dad was diagnosed with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy at age 52. He has been on medication for a few months, but doctors said he likely will need surgery, even though his symptoms are very mild. Is surgery always necessary for people with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy? Should my siblings and I be tested for the [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - April 16, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Understanding the heart attack gender gap
Imagine someone in the throes of a heart attack. If you pictured a man clutching his chest in agony, that’s understandable. At younger ages, men face a greater risk of heart disease than women. On average, a first heart attack — the most common manifestation of this prevalent disease — strikes men at age 65. For women, the average age of a first heart attack is 72. However, heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States for both genders. In fact, since 1984, more women have died of heart disease than men each year, although that is partly because women generally live longer than men. So ...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - April 15, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Julie Corliss Tags: Health Heart Health Women's Health Source Type: news

Infections of the heart with common viruses
(Bentham Science Publishers) Virus infections of the heart are a significant cause of sudden unexpected death due to cardiovascular reasons in young men and also produce chronic cardiomyopathy which frequently requires heart transplantation. The review in the journal Current Pharmaceutical Design provides current updates on our understanding of how virus infection and the body's immune response to that infection result in heart injury. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 31, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Children with cardiomyopathy benefit from treating entire family, new study suggests
New research shows how more severe cases of pediatric cardiomyopathy-linked heart disease are associated with reduced 'quality of life and functional status,' which can have a negative impact on families of the patients and thus contribute to poor outcomes. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 23, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

New study suggests children with cardiomyopathy benefit from treating entire family
(Wayne State University - Office of the Vice President for Research) Recently published in the Journal of Pediatrics, a long-term study initiated by the Children's Hospital of Michigan DMC and Wayne State University shows how more severe cases of pediatric cardiomyopathy-linked heart disease are associated with reduced 'quality of life and functional status,' which can have a negative impact on families of the patients and thus contribute to poor outcomes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 23, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Joyful Events Can Lead to 'Broken Heart Syndrome,' Says StudyJoyful Events Can Lead to 'Broken Heart Syndrome,' Says Study
These new findings about takotsubo cardiomyopathy "may lead to a paradigm shift," said one researcher. "Physicians need to be aware even positive stressors might bear risk for acute cardiac disease." Heartwire from Medscape (Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines - March 22, 2016 Category: Cardiology Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

Are Our Hearts Hardwired to Heal Our Heads?
“I put my heart and my soul into my work, and have lost my mind in the process”- Vincent Van Gogh We are accustomed to thinking of our brains as the arbiter of decisions and higher functioning in our lives. While the brain weighs approximately three pounds and the average heart for a man is 10 ounces and 8 ounces for a woman, the heart often speaks more loudly and effectively than the mind. Although they are a mass of tissue, fiber, veins and arteries, both organs guide us in rudimentary and executive functioning, higher learning, decision making and healing. What Is the Link Between Depression and Cardiac Well...
Source: Psych Central - March 16, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Edie Weinstein, MSW, LSW Tags: Diet & Nutrition Disorders General Healthy Living Psychology Relationships & Love Relaxation and Meditation Self-Help Treatment Artery ‘takotsubo cardiomyopathy Blood Blood Pressure Cardiac muscle Circulatory system Doc Chi Source Type: news

Heart Metabolics Announces Multiple Senior Appointments To Management Team
All functional areas strengthened to support advancement of the clinical pipeline DUBLIN and SAN FRANCISCO, March 15, 2016 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- Heart Metabolics Limited (Heart Metabolics), a biotechnology company focused on the ... Biopharmaceuticals, Cardiology, PersonnelHeart Metabolics, perhexiline, Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - March 15, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Hypertension in Pregnancy: A Lasting Cardiomyopathy RiskHypertension in Pregnancy: A Lasting Cardiomyopathy Risk
Asking a simple question on whether a patient has a history of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy could tilt physician thinking more toward the heart, the senior author said. Heartwire from Medscape (Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines - March 12, 2016 Category: Cardiology Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

Percutaneous Septal Ablation Safe in Younger Patients, Too (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- Study supports extending age range for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy therapy (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - March 10, 2016 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Pregnancy HTN Disorders Tied to Cardiomyopathy Risk (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- Small but clear increase more than 5 months post-delivery (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - March 9, 2016 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

You Can Be So Happy It Breaks Your Heart
File this under depressing things we didn't know. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, or the temporary weakening of the heart's main pumping ventricle, is colloquially known as "broken heart syndrome" because the condition is often triggered by negative high-stress life events. (Death of a spouse is often cited, but a tearful breakup qualifies, too.)  As it turns out, "broken heart syndrome" might be a misnomer, according to a new study published this month in the European Heart Journal. Of 485 people who described definitive emotional triggers leading up to their takotsubo cardiomyopathy diagnoses, four per...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 4, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

You Can Be So Happy It Breaks Your Heart
File this under depressing things we didn't know. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, or the temporary weakening of the heart's main pumping ventricle, is colloquially known as "broken heart syndrome" because the condition is often triggered by negative high-stress life events. (Death of a spouse is often cited, but a tearful breakup qualifies, too.)  As it turns out, "broken heart syndrome" might be a misnomer, according to a new study published this month in the European Heart Journal. Of 485 people who described definitive emotional triggers leading up to their takotsubo cardiomyopathy diagnoses, four per...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 4, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

It’s not just sadness. Happiness can break your heart, too.
Sadness can weigh on you quite dearly, and sometimes a particularly sad or stressful event can trigger what's known as "broken heart syndrome." Under this condition, also known as Takotsubo syndrome or stress cardiomyopathy, the heart muscles rapidly and severely weaken. This temporary ailment causes  severe chest pain and can lead to life-altering consequences such as heart […] (Source: Washington Post: To Your Health)
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - March 3, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Elahe Izadi Tags: women's health wellness Source Type: news

Athlete's Heart or Cardiomyopathy? NBA Helps Find DifferenceAthlete's Heart or Cardiomyopathy? NBA Helps Find Difference
Data from stress echocardiography of elite US basketball players should provide benchmarks for distinguishing exercise-induced cardiac remodeling from cardiomyopathy in exceptionally large athletes. Heartwire from Medscape (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - March 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

A new normal: Life after pediatric heart transplant
Left to right: Tommie Deitz (uncle), Danny Deitz, Terry Deitz (father), Kayla Deitz (sister), Pam Deitz (aunt) and Trish Deitz (mother) In September 2015, Simsbury, Connecticut, high school junior Danny Deitz had a heart transplant.  After a few months of rest and recovery, he’s now back at school, returned to the gym and is spending quality time with his friends. Danny shares what he’s learned throughout his experience with cardiomyopathy and heart failure. All in all, life’s been really great. I went back to school four weeks ago. Getting back into the work was a bit tough at first — I ...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - February 25, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Erin Horan Tags: Our Patients’ Stories cardiomyopathy Dr. Elizabeth Blume Dr. Kevin Daly heart heart failure heart transplant Source Type: news

New blood test can detect a range of inherited heart conditions
Conclusion This study aimed to develop a more comprehensive diagnostic test for a wide range of inherited heart conditions. The researchers developed a single test that was able to look at 174 genes known or suspected to cause these conditions. It was quicker and gave better coverage of the genes it looked at than the existing methods it was tested against. Such a test is likely to be very useful when a person is thought to have an inherited heart condition, but it is not known exactly which gene is causing it. It could help doctors to quickly identify the exact cause and start the person on appropriate treatment, and a...
Source: NHS News Feed - February 19, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Genetics/stem cells Medical practice Source Type: news

ECG Abnormalities in Elite High School AthletesECG Abnormalities in Elite High School Athletes
This study compares the ECG findings between elite student athletes and adolescents with confirmed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. British Journal of Sports Medicine (Source: Medscape Orthopaedics Headlines)
Source: Medscape Orthopaedics Headlines - February 18, 2016 Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Cardiology Journal Article Source Type: news

FDA mandates PMAs for metal-on-metal hip implants
The FDA said today that it will require the manufacturers of metal-on-metal hip implants to put the devices through its stringent pre-market approval process. The federal safety watchdog said its final order affects 2 types of MoM hips: Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained with a cemented acetabular component, and hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained with an uncemented acetabular component. The devices, many of which have been recalled or otherwise pulled from the market, have been found to deliver failure rates as high as 43% after 9 years. Metal-on-metal hip implants came under intense scrutiny following th...
Source: Mass Device - February 17, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Metal-on-Metal Orthopedics Regulatory/Compliance Hips Source Type: news

Screening athletes for undetected heart problems: What parents need to know now
Dr. Gian Corrado, a physician in Boston Children’s Hospital Sports Medicine, was an undergraduate playing pick-up basketball when one of his teammates died suddenly on the court. Unfortunately, the young player’s death is not an isolated tragedy. Every three days, a young athlete somewhere in the U.S. collapses and dies due to an undetected heart problem. “It’s uncommon,” Corrado says, “but it’s not SO uncommon that it may not touch you. It happens, and we have no effective, efficient way to screen for it.” The National College Athletic Association’s chief medical ...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - February 15, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Erin Horan Tags: Ask the Expert Health & Wellness In the News Parenting Teen Health Division of Sports Medicine Dr. Gianmichel Corrado Dr. John Triedman echocardiogram EKG screening Heart Center Source Type: news

Pioneering discovery leads to potential preventive treatment for sudden cardiac death
(University of Vermont) Roughly 15 years ago, a team of Vermont researchers discovered the precise malfunction of a specific protein in the heart that leads to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, a common culprit in cases of sudden death in young athletes. A team of Harvard scientists and colleagues used some of these findings to develop a possible treatment to prevent this inherited disease that can cause the heart to thicken and stop pumping blood effectively, leading to heart failure. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 5, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

[Perspective] Throttling back the heart's molecular motor
A young athlete collapses and dies during competition. Autopsy reveals an enlarged heart with thickened walls in which the cardiac muscle cells are in disarray and surrounded by fibrotic tissue. Until 1990, the cause of such sudden death was unknown. This devastating condition, called familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), was eventually linked to a mutation in myosin (1), the heart's molecular motor. Today, more than 300 separate HCM-causing mutations have been identified throughout the myosin molecule. On page 617 of this issue, Green et al. (2) describe a small molecule that binds to myosin and inhibits its activit...
Source: ScienceNOW - February 5, 2016 Category: Science Authors: David M. Warshaw Tags: Heart Disease Source Type: news

[Report] A small-molecule inhibitor of sarcomere contractility suppresses hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in mice
Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is an inherited disease of heart muscle that can be caused by mutations in sarcomere proteins. Clinical diagnosis depends on an abnormal thickening of the heart, but the earliest signs of disease are hyperdynamic contraction and impaired relaxation. Whereas some in vitro studies of power generation by mutant and wild-type sarcomere proteins are consistent with mutant sarcomeres exhibiting enhanced contractile power, others are not. We identified a small molecule, MYK-461, that reduces contractility by decreasing the adenosine triphosphatase activity of the cardiac myosin heavy chain. Here ...
Source: ScienceNOW - February 5, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Eric M. Green Source Type: news

Sir David Frost’s son Miles died from genetic heart condition
Miles Frost, 31, died last summer after collapsing while out jogging near the family's holiday home in Oxfordshire. But now it has come to light he died from hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Potential heart disorder cause, treatment identified
A novel therapy tested scientists for treating a fatal heart disorder in dogs might ultimately help in diagnosing and treating heart disease in humans. The team also identified potential causes of inherited dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) or "weak heart." (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - January 11, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

What happens when you faint?
Were you watching the news on CNN recently when anchor Poppy Harlow fainted during a live broadcast? She was talking about a graphic on the screen at the time when, over a period of 10 seconds or so, her speech became halting and slurred — and then there was silence. With the graphic regarding President Obama’s approval ratings still on display, the broadcast moved on to a commercial. After a CNN colleague filled in briefly, Ms. Harlow, who is pregnant, reappeared and reassured her audience that she was fine. She explained that she got a little warm, fainted briefly, and now felt fine. She finished up the show ...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - January 11, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert Shmerling, M.D. Tags: Stress faint fainting Source Type: news

Peripartum and 'Idiopathic' Cardiomyopathies Share Gene VariantsPeripartum and 'Idiopathic' Cardiomyopathies Share Gene Variants
Pregnancy-related cardiomyopathy may share genetic underpinnings with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, say researchers. "For the first time, we have an explanation for a subset of these women that is quite novel." Heartwire from Medscape (Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines - January 7, 2016 Category: Cardiology Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

BioVentrix pulls in $14m in funding round, touts pre-clinicals
BioVentrix raised $14 million in a new round of equity funding and said it performed the 1st implantation of its micro-anchor Revivent device in a pre-clinical model. The Revivent treatment is a transcatheter-based procedure known as less invasive ventricular enhancement that reduces the overall size of the wall of the heart’s left ventricle, without the need for cardiopulmonary bypass or incisions in the heart, according to the company. The funds came from 64 anonymous investors, with the company looking to pull in another $3.5 million before the round closes, according to an SEC filing. “The next generation o...
Source: Mass Device - December 8, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Cardiovascular Cardiac Implants BioVentrix Source Type: news

Bone Marrow Cell Injection in Dilated CardiomyopathyBone Marrow Cell Injection in Dilated Cardiomyopathy
Might transplantation of autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells, delivered by intracoronary injection, improve heart function in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy? European Heart Journal (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - December 8, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology Journal Article Source Type: news

TGen and Barrow identify genes linked to stress-triggered heart disease
(The Translational Genomics Research Institute) Researchers at the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) and Barrow Neurological Institute have for the first time identified genetic risk factors that are linked to stress-induced cardiomyopathy (SIC), a rare type of heart disease. Patients with SIC generally show no symptoms until they suffer some form of intense emotional or physiological distress. For this reason the disorder is sometimes referred to as 'broken heart syndrome.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 30, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Exercise is not always the best thing for your heart
Arrhythmogenic ventricular cardiomyopathy strikes down healthy individuals in their prime. New research aims to find early markers for this destructive disease. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - November 27, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiovascular / Cardiology Source Type: news

A different kind of anesthesia a possible treatment for stress-induced cardiomyopathy
(University of Gothenburg) Stress induced cardiomyopathy after cerebral hemorrhage has been shown to increase the risk of further brain damage. These patients can now be identified by a simple blood test, and a possible treatment for stress induced cardiomyopathy has been discovered -- a different kind of anesthesia than that currently being used. A new doctoral thesis at the University of Gothenburg has explored these issues. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 25, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

U.K. lawyers, medical device makers convene over metal-on-metal hip lawsuits
Lawyers from both sides in more than 1,000 U.K. lawsuits filed over metal-on-metal hip implants reportedly met yesterday in London’s High Court for an unprecedented case management conference to consolidate the suits. There are 11 separate products involved in the litigation, including hip implants made by Johnson & Johnson (NYSE:JNJ) subsidiary DePuy Synthes, Zimmer Biomet (NYSE:ZBH), Smith & Nephew (NYSE:SNN), Corin and others, Lexology reported. A 2013 review of 17,000 hip replacement cases by Britain’s National Institute for Health & Care Excellence found failure rates as high as 43% a...
Source: Mass Device - November 13, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Legal News Metal-on-Metal Product Liability Corin Group plc DePuy Synthes Hips Smith & Nephew Zimmer Biomet Source Type: news

Miscarriage: Keep breaking the silence
I’m heartened to see more public discourse about the pain of miscarriage. Recently, Mark Zuckerberg, the CEO of Facebook, went public on his Facebook page with the pregnancy losses that he and his partner suffered. Beyonce and Jay-Z wrote a song about their first pregnancy loss. Nicole Kidman, Mariah Carey, Celine Dion, Courteney Cox, and Brooke Shields have all publicly shared their miscarriage experiences. But all too often, I still find women and their partners suffering in silence and alone. Recently, researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City surveyed over, 1,000 adults in the United Sta...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - November 10, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Hope Ricciotti, MD Tags: Behavioral Health Family Planning and Pregnancy Mental Health Parenting Women's Health Source Type: news

Cardiac Findings in Infants of Diabetic Mothers
This article describes the history, potential causes, and pathophysiology of HCM and details a rational management plan for the treatment of these patients. (Source: NeoReviews recent issues)
Source: NeoReviews recent issues - November 2, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Yeh, J., Berger, S. Tags: Pediatric Drug Labeling Update Articles Source Type: news

Danny Strong: High school athlete battles heart failure, gets transplant
As a varsity football and lacrosse player, 17-year-old Simsbury, Connecticut native Danny Deitz was used to pushing the limits of his physical endurance. No doubt the competitive spirit was passed down to him from his father, Terry Deitz, a retired U.S. Navy pilot and two-time Survivor contestant. But last spring, Danny became concerned about a mysterious decline in his health.  Plays that were once second nature became strenuous, and he started to struggle with breathing during activity. Eventually, Danny felt weak just walking up the stairs of his high school. He was in heart failure — and about to face t...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - October 29, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Erin Horan Tags: Heart conditions Our patients’ stories cardiomyopathy congestive heart failure heart transplant ventricular assist device Source Type: news

TCT 2015: Medtronic touts CoreValve TAVI real-world registry data
Update: Added data from study of new patient populations Medtronic (NYSE:MDT) said today it released the 1st real-world registry study of its CoreValve transcatheter aortic valve implant, reporting outcomes in-line with its clinical trials of the device. The medtech giant also released new data from 3 studies focusing on new patient populations with significant comorbidities today. Data from all of the CoreValve studies was presented at the annual Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics conference in San Franscisco. The 6,160-patient Society of Thoracic Surgeons and American College of Cardiology TVT registry study ...
Source: Mass Device - October 13, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Cardiac Implants Cardiovascular Catheters Clinical Trials Medtronic TCT 2015 Source Type: news

Medtronic touts CoreValve TAVR real-world registry data
Medtronic (NYSE:MDT) said today it released the 1st real-world registry study of its CoreValve transcatheter aortic valve replacement, reporting outcomes in-line with its clinical trials of the device. The 6,160-patient Society of Thoracic Surgeons and American College of Cardiology TVT registry study reported a 5.2% rate of all-cause mortality and 2.6% rate of stroke at 30 days. Those rates are consistent with the 6.9% and 5% rates, respectively, from the pivotal trial, Fridley, Minn.-based Medtronic said. “It is reassuring to see that the profound clinical results in the U.S. CoreValve Pivotal studies were rep...
Source: Mass Device - October 12, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Cardiac Implants Cardiovascular Catheters Clinical Trials Medtronic Source Type: news

Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: near drowning and hanging sound familiar - Champion S.
[Abstract unavailable] Language: en... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - October 11, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Drowning, Suffocation Source Type: news

Yale launches ResearchKit app for people with cardiomyopathy
Yale has launched a study for people who have or may develop cardiomyopathy, a disease of the heart muscle, on ResearchKit, Apple’s open source platform that helps researchers build medical apps and recruit patients for clinical trials. The iPhone-based study, called the Yale Cardiomyopathy Index, was developed by Yale School of Medicine researchers E. Kevin Hall and Dr. Michele […] (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - October 1, 2015 Category: Information Technology Authors: Aditi Pai Tags: Provider cardiomyopathy heart health app ResearchKit Yale Yale Cardiomyopathy Index Yale School of Medicine Source Type: news

Yale School of Medicine uses ResearchKit App to assess heart conditions
(Yale University) Imagine being able to contribute to research about heart problems affecting children and adults with an iPhone app. That idea is now a reality with today's launch of the Yale Cardiomyopathy Index, an iPhone-based clinical study to better understand quality of life for people ages two to 80 who have or may develop a cardiomyopathy -- an abnormality in the heart muscle. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 30, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Your NEJM Group Today: Cardiomyopathy & Muscle Weakness, Unruptured Aneurysm Decision Tool, Wash. State IM Opportunity (FREE)
By the Editors NEJM Group offers so many valuable resources for practicing clinicians. Here's what we chose for you today:NEJM Clinical Practice Center: Case Record: A 50-year-old … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - September 30, 2015 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

New Publication Demonstrates Improved Value of Cardiac MRI in Duchenne
The neuromuscular group at Great Ormond Street Hospital, London UK, have recently published their study comparing the effectiveness of echocardiogram with cardiac MRI in the assessment Duchenne cardiomyopathy in patients preparing for surgical procedures. (Source: Parent Project Muscular Dystrophy)
Source: Parent Project Muscular Dystrophy - September 29, 2015 Category: Neurology Source Type: news

Energy Impairment With Exercise in Hypertrophic CardiomyopathyEnergy Impairment With Exercise in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy
Find out how cardiac energetics are impaired during exercise in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. European Heart Journal (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - September 22, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology Journal Article Source Type: news

Recent ESC guidelines to identify HCM patients at high risk for sudden death unreliable
(Elsevier Health Sciences) Recently, the European Society of Cardiology published new guidelines advancing an equation as the best way to determine which hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients should receive an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. However, a study conducted by US and Canadian investigators challenges the ESC Guidelines. Their research found that the ESC sudden death risk score method did not perform effectively in reliably identifying the high-risk patients who need ICDs for the prevention of sudden death. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 21, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Can You Die of a Broken Heart?
Nearly everyone has experienced the death of someone that they know and love. And for many, the loss is so overwhelming that they feel the physical effects of grief. For some, it may come in the form of an upset stomach, loss of appetite, sleepless nights or a prolonged headache. And yet for others, they feel a tightening in the chest, difficulty breathing and believe they are experiencing a heart attack. They may actually go to the emergency room. Their grief manifests itself in what some call "broken heart syndrome." The Mayo Clinic defines it as this: "Broken heart syndrome may be caused by the heart's re...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 14, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Endurance Sports May Affect Female, Male Hearts DifferentlyEndurance Sports May Affect Female, Male Hearts Differently
Unlike for their male counterparts, increased heart wall thickness is not common in female endurance athletes and may be a warning of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, say researchers. Heartwire from Medscape (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - September 9, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news